statement of task. The present chapter extracts the key findings of the report and presents seven recommendations for improving the outcomes of investments in maintenance and repair of federal facilities. Chapter 7 is intended to show how some of the recommendations could be implemented by federal facilities program managers.

FINDINGS

Finding 1. An array of beneficial outcomes can be achieved through timely investments in facilities maintenance and repair (Table 6.1). Those outcomes support mission achievement, compliance with regulations, improved condition, efficient operations, and stakeholder-driven initiatives. All the outcomes can be measured. Some outcomes including reliability and physical condition can be predicted; that is, they can be estimated before an investment is made or if an investment is not made.

When federal facilities program managers identify maintenance and repair requirements, they typically include projects that focus on objectives related to a mission, to compliance with safety and health regulations, to improving facility condition or extending service life, to efficient operations, or to stakeholder-driven

TABLE 6.1 Beneficial Outcomes Related to Investments in Maintenance and Repair


Mission-Related Outcomes Compliance-Related Outcomes Condition-Related Outcomes Efficient Operations Stakeholder-Driven Outcomes

Improved reliability Fewer accidents and injuries Improved condition Less reactive. unplanned Customer satisfaction
Improved productivity Fewer building-related illnesses Reduced backlog of deferred maintenance and repair Improved public image
Functionality Efficient space utilization Fewer insurance claims, lawsuits, and regulatory violations maintenance and repairs Lower operating costs Lower life-cycle costs Cost avoidance
Reduced energy use
Reduced water use
Reduced greenhouse gas emissions



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement