B

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Daniel R. Glickman, J.D. (Chair) is executive director of congressional programs at The Aspen Institute in Washington, DC. He is also senior fellow at The Bipartisan Policy Center. He previously served as president of Refugees International and chairman and chief executive officer of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). Prior to joining the MPAA in September 2004, Mr. Glickman was director of the Institute of Politics at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government (August 2002-August 2004). He served as the 26th U.S. Secretary of Agriculture from March 1995 until January 2001. During his tenure, improving the nation’s diet and nutrition and fighting hunger were among the department’s priorities. Before his appointment as Secretary of Agriculture, Mr. Glickman served for 18 years in the U.S. House of Representatives, representing Kansas’s 4th Congressional District. During his time in Congress, he was a member of the House Agriculture Committee, including 6 years as chairman of the subcommittee with jurisdiction over federal farm policy issues; nutrition policy; the Food Stamp Program; the National School Lunch Program and other child nutrition programs; and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). He also served as chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. Mr. Glickman is co-chair of the Chicago Council on Global Affairs’ Global Agricultural Development Initiative and vice chairman of World Food Program USA (formerly the Friends of the World Food Program). His service includes membership on the board of directors of the American Film Institute, CME Group, Communities in Schools, the Food Research and Action Center, the National 4-H Council, the William Davidson Institute at the University of



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B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Daniel R. Glickman, J.D. (Chair) is executive director of congressional pro- grams at The Aspen Institute in Washington, DC. He is also senior fellow at The Bipartisan Policy Center. He previously served as president of Refugees International and chairman and chief executive officer of the Motion Pic- ture Association of America (MPAA). Prior to joining the MPAA in Septem- ber 2004, Mr. Glickman was director of the Institute of Politics at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government (August 2002-August 2004). He served as the 26th U.S. Secretary of Agriculture from March 1995 until January 2001. During his tenure, improving the nation’s diet and nutrition and fighting hunger were among the department’s priorities. Before his appointment as Secretary of Agriculture, Mr. Glickman served for 18 years in the U.S. House of Representatives, representing Kansas’s 4th Congressional District. During his time in Congress, he was a member of the House Agriculture Committee, including 6 years as chairman of the subcommittee with jurisdiction over federal farm policy issues; nutrition policy; the Food Stamp Program; the National School Lunch Program and other child nutrition programs; and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Pro- gram for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). He also served as chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. Mr. Glickman is co-chair of the Chicago Council on Global Affairs’ Global Agricultural Development Initiative and vice chairman of World Food Program USA (formerly the Friends of the World Food Program). His service includes membership on the board of directors of the American Film Institute, CME Group, Communities in Schools, the Food Research and Action Center, the National 4-H Council, the William Davidson Institute at the University of 123

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124 MEASURING PROGRESS IN OBESITY PREVENTION Michigan, and the Center for U.S. Global Engagement. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Council on American Politics at the Graduate School of Political Management at The George Washington University, and a senior fellow of the Center on Communication, Leader- ship, and Policy at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. In addition, Mr. Glickman is a co-chair of AGree, a multi- foundation effort to review long term food and agricultural policy. Mr. Glickman received his B.A. in history from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from The George Washington University. He is a member of the Kansas and District of Columbia Bars. M. R. C. Greenwood, Ph.D. (Vice Chair) is president of the University of Hawaii System, a position she assumed in 2009. Previously, Dr. Greenwood was professor of nutrition and internal medicine, chair of the Graduate Group in Nutritional Biology, and director of the Foods for Health Initia- tive at the University of California, Davis. She served as chancellor of the University of California, Santa Cruz, from 1996 to 2004 and as University of California provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. Prior to her Santa Cruz appointments, Dr. Greenwood was dean of graduate studies, vice provost of academic outreach, and professor of biology and internal medicine at the University of California, Davis. Previously, she was chair of the Department of Biology at Vassar College. From 1993 to 1995, Dr. Greenwood served as associate director for science at the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President of the United States. She is the author of numerous scientific publications in the areas of nutrition, obesity, and diabetes. Dr. Greenwood is past president and fel- low of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, fellow of the American Academies of Arts and Sciences, and past president of the North American Association for the Study of Obesity. She is past chair of the IOM’s Food and Nutrition Board, the NRC Policy and Global Affairs Committee, and the IOM Committee on Dietary Supplement Use by Mili- tary Personnel, and is a former member of the National Science Board. Dr. Greenwood received her A.B., summa cum laude, from Vassar College and her Ph.D. from The Rockefeller University. She is a member of the IOM. William Purcell, III, J.D. (Vice Chair) is an attorney in Nashville, Tennes- see, who most recently served as special advisor on Allston and co-chair of the Work Team for Allston in the Office of the President at Harvard University. From 2008 until 2010, he served as director of the Institute of Politics at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. Previously, Mr. Purcell was mayor of Nashville, Tennessee, from 1999 to 2007. Mr. Purcell’s accomplishments as a civic leader earned him Public Official of the Year honors in 2006 from Governing Magazine. In 1986 he was elected

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125 APPENDIX B to the Tennessee House of Representatives, where he served for five terms, serving in the positions of majority leader and chair of the Select Commit- tee on Children and Youth. After retiring from the General Assembly, he founded and became director of the Child and Family Policy Center at the Vanderbilt Institute of Public Policy Studies. Mr. Purcell was a member of the IOM Committee on an Evidence Framework for Obesity Prevention Decision Making. He graduated from Hamilton College and Vanderbilt University School of Law. David V. B. Britt, M.P.A., is retired president and chief executive officer of Sesame Workshop. Mr. Britt’s professional experience includes execu- tive positions with the U.S. Agency for International Development, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and the Overseas Private Investment Corporation. Since his retirement, Mr. Britt has been engaged in consulting and leadership development for nonprofit organizations. He is currently chair of the board of directors of The Education Trust. Mr. Britt has been a member of the Advisory Board on Social Enterprise at the Harvard Business School, and is a member of the Council on Foreign Rela- tions and the Board of INMED Partnerships for Children. He is a former member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM)/National Research Council (NRC) Board on Children, Youth, and Families. He previously served as a member of the IOM Committee on Obesity Prevention Policies for Young Children and the IOM Committee on Food Marketing and the Diets of Children and Youth. He received a B.A. from Wesleyan University and an M.P.A. from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Jamie F. Chriqui, Ph.D., M.H.S., is senior research scientist and director of policy surveillance and evaluation in the Health Policy Center within the Institute for Health Research and Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and research associate professor in political science at UIC. She has more than 21 years’ experience conducting public health policy research, evaluation, and analysis, with an emphasis on obesity, substance abuse, tobacco control, and other chronic disease-related policy issues. Dr. Chriqui has led a number of efforts to develop quantitative measures of the extensiveness of state- and local-level public health policies. Her research interests focus on examining the impact of law and policy on community and school environments as well as individual behaviors and attitudes. Her current research focuses on sugar-sweetened beverage taxa- tion, school district wellness policies, and community policies related to the physical activity and food environments. She directs all state, local and school district policy research activities for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-supported Bridging the Gap program and is principal investiga-

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126 MEASURING PROGRESS IN OBESITY PREVENTION tor or co-investigator on several NIH-funded research grants. She serves on numerous obesity-related advisory and expert panels and is widely called upon for her expertise in obesity policy-related issues. Before joining UIC, Dr. Chriqui served as technical vice president of the Center for Health Policy and Legislative Analysis at The MayaTech Corporation and prior to that as a policy analyst at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. She holds a B.A. in political science from Barnard College at Columbia University; an M.H.S. in health policy from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health; and a Ph.D. in policy sciences (health policy concentration) from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Patricia Crawford, Dr.P.H., R.D., is director of the Dr. Robert C. and Veronica Atkins Center for Weight and Health, Cooperative Extension nutrition specialist in the Department of Nutritional Science and Toxicol- ogy, and adjunct professor in the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Crawford directed the longitudinal National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study, a study of the development of cardiovascular risk factors in African American and white girls, as well as the Five-State FitWIC Initiative to Prevent Childhood Obe- sity. She has developed numerous obesity prevention materials, including the Fit Families novella series for Latino families and Let’s Get Moving, an activity program for those who work with young children. She has served on a number of advisory committees including the California Legislative Task Force on Diabetes and Obesity. Dr. Crawford’s current studies include evaluations of large community-based obesity initiatives and school-based policy interventions. She is a member of the IOM Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention and has served as a member or chair of three IOM obesity-related planning committees. She earned a B.S. from the Uni- versity of Washington and a doctorate in public health and an R.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Christina Economos, Ph.D., is associate professor of nutrition and New Balance Chair in Childhood Nutrition at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. She also serves as director of Chil- dObesity180. Her research focuses on the interactions among exercise, diet, and body composition. Her translational research includes theory-based obesity prevention interventions with ethnically and socioeconomically diverse children, adolescents, and their families in urban and rural com- munities across the United States. Dr. Economos was principal investigator for the Shape Up Somerville (SUS) project and currently leads several large obesity prevention intervention trials. The SUS project targeted behavior change in children through community-based, environmental change in a low-income, racially/ethnically diverse population. Dr. Economos has

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127 APPENDIX B held positions in public health nutrition, including at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. She serves on numerous state and national advisory boards. She was a consultant on the Youth Subcommittee for the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines and is a member of the Public Policy Committee of the American Society for Nutrition. Dr. Economos served as a member of the IOM Committee on an Evidence Framework for Obesity Prevention Decision Making. She earned her M.S. at Columbia University and her Ph.D. at the Friedman School for Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. Sandra G. Hassink, M.D., began the Pediatric Weight Management Clinic at A.I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Delaware, in 1988. The clinic is part of the Division of General Pediatrics; it uses a multidis- ciplinary, family-based approach to obesity and cares for children from infancy to young adulthood. Dr. Hassink is now director of the Nemours Obesity Initiative. She works both in the clinical division treating obese pediatric patients and in Nemours Health and Prevention Services, and has served as clinical consultant for the Primary Care Quality Collaborative on childhood obesity and in helping to develop obesity-related policy at the community and state levels. Dr. Hassink has collaborated in basic research efforts to identify pathophysiologic mechanisms of obesity, centering on the role of leptin, and has lectured widely in the field of pediatric obesity. In addition to her other responsibilities, she currently chairs the ethics committee at A.I. duPont Hospital for Children. Dr. Hassink serves on the board of directors of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), has been a member of the AAP Task Force on Obesity, and is currently chair of the AAP Obesity Leadership Workgroup. She is the author of A Parent’s Guide to Childhood Obesity; Pediatric Obesity: Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment Strategies for Primary Care; and Clinical Guide to Pediatric Weight Management. Dr. Hassink received her medical degree from Vander- bilt Medical School and a master’s degree in pastoral care and counseling from Neumann College. Anthony B. Iton, M.D., J.D., is senior vice president for healthy communi- ties at The California Endowment in Oakland. In this role, he directs the foundation’s 10-year Building Healthy Communities: California Living 2.0 initiative, an effort to create communities where children are healthy, safe, and ready to learn. Prior to assuming this role, Dr. Iton served as both health officer and director of the Public Health Department for Alameda County (Oakland, California), beginning in 2003. There he oversaw the creation of an innovative public health practice designed to eliminate health disparities by tackling the root causes of poor health commonly found in California’s low-income communities. Dr. Iton also served for 3 years as

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128 MEASURING PROGRESS IN OBESITY PREVENTION director of health and human services and school medical advisor for the City of Stamford, Connecticut. Concurrently he served as a physician in internal medicine for Stamford Hospital’s HIV clinic. He also has served as a primary care physician for the San Francisco Department of Public Health. Dr. Iton’s work has been published in numerous public health and medical journals, and he is a regular public health lecturer and keynote speaker. He earned his B.S. in neurophysiology from McGill University, his M.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Steven H. Kelder, Ph.D., M.P.H., is Beth Toby Grossman Distinguished Professor in Spirituality and Healing and co-director of the Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living at the University of Texas School of Public Health in Austin. Dr. Kelder has directed National Institutes of Health (NIH)- and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)- funded research projects focused on developing and evaluating school- based programs that address risk behaviors among children and adolescents in order to reduce chronic disease, and include promotion of healthy eat- ing and physical activity and prevention of tobacco use and osteoporosis. He has been a principal investigator directing efforts to disseminate the CATCH program, which has been adopted by elementary schools nation- wide, including more than 2,500 elementary schools in Texas, potentially reaching more than 1,000,000 Texas children. Dr. Kelder has authored or co-authored numerous scientific papers and book chapters over the past 15 years addressing the design and analysis of epidemiological studies and health promotion interventions. He teaches graduate courses in epidemiol- ogy, social and behavioral aspects of behavior change, community nutrition education, epidemiology of child and adolescent health, and obesity and public health. Dr. Kelder received his Ph.D. in behavioral epidemiology and M.P.H. in community health education from the University of Minnesota, and a B.S. in marketing and economics from Northern Illinois University. Harold W. (Bill) Kohl, III, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., is professor of epidemiology and kinesiology at the University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, and in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education at the Uni- versity of Texas, Austin, College of Education. Dr. Kohl is also faculty at the Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living in Austin. He is the founder and director of the University of Texas Physical Activity Epide- miology Program, where he is responsible for student training, research, and community service related to physical activity and public health. His previous service includes directing physical activity epidemiology and sur- veillance projects in the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obe- sity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Kohl’s research

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129 APPENDIX B focuses on epidemiology related to physical inactivity and obesity in both adults and children. Dr. Kohl also studies the effect of the built environment on physical activity and is currently researching a planned development that implements “smart growth” techniques that support physically active lifestyles. He received an M.S.P.H. from the University of South Carolina School of Public Health in epidemiology and biostatistics and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston School of Public Health, in community health studies. Shiriki K. Kumanyika, Ph.D., M.S.W., M.P.H., R.D., is professor of epide- miology in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology and Pediatrics (Gastroenterology, Nutrition Section) and associate dean for health pro- motion and disease prevention at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. Dr. Kumanyika’s interdisciplinary background inte- grates epidemiology, nutrition, prevention, minority health, and women’s health issues across the life course. The main themes of her research have concerned the role of nutritional factors in the primary and secondary prevention of chronic diseases, with a particular focus on obesity, sodium reduction, and related health problems such as hypertension and diabetes. She has a particular interest in the epidemiology and prevention of obe- sity among African Americans. Dr. Kumanyika has served on numerous national and international advisory committees and expert panels related to nutrition and obesity. She is co-chair of the International Obesity Task Force, the policy and advocacy arm of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, and serves as a consultant to the World Health Organization’s Department of Nutrition for Health and Development. Dr. Kumanyika served as a member of the IOM Food and Nutrition Board, chair of the IOM Committee on an Evidence Framework for Obesity Prevention Decision Making, and a member of the IOM Committee on Prevention of Obesity in Children and Youth. She is currently chair of the IOM Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention. She received a B.A. from Syracuse University, an M.S.W. from Columbia University, a Ph.D. in human nutrition from Cornell University, and an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University. She is a member of the IOM. Philip A. Marineau, M.B.A., is operating partner with LNK Partners, a pri- vate equity firm in White Plains, New York. Mr. Marineau also is currently chairman of the Board of Shutterfly, an online photo sharing and greeting card company, and holds numerous other board positions, including posi- tions with Kaiser Permanente, the Meredith Corporation, and Georgetown University. At LNK Partners, Mr. Marineau’s experience guides the firm’s investments, which are exclusively in the consumer and retail sector. He has had a 33-year career working in the major name brand consumer retail

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130 MEASURING PROGRESS IN OBESITY PREVENTION business. Mr. Marineau was president of Quaker Oats, where he worked for 23 years. Thereafter, he served as president of Dean Foods, a dairy company, from 1996 to 1997. He then served as president of Pepsi-Cola North America, from 1997 to 1999, and then as president and chief execu- tive officer of Levi Strauss, the global apparel company, from 1999 to 2006. Mr. Marineau received his M.B.A. from Northwestern University and his B.A. in history from Georgetown University. Victoria Rideout, M.A., is president and founder of VJR Consulting, a private consulting firm specializing in media research and social marketing strategy. Until 2010 she served as vice president of the Kaiser Family Foun- dation and director of the foundation’s Program for the Study of Media and Health. Ms. Rideout directed more than 30 studies on topics concerning media and health, including a 10-year study tracking the evolving nature of media use among children and youth, research quantifying the amount and nature of food advertising to children on television and the Internet, surveys on teenagers’ use of the Internet for health information, content analyses of public service advertising on television, and several studies documenting the positive influence of health-related content in entertainment televi- sion. Her research has been published in peer-reviewed journals such as the Journal of the American Medical Association, Pediatrics, the Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, Health Affairs, and American Behavioral Scientist, and has been widely reported in the news media. Ms. Rideout has also negotiated partnerships with the television networks MTV, BET, and UPN, securing high-profile, multi-million-dollar donations of media time to conduct youth-oriented public education campaigns. The public service ads, original long-form programming, and online content she helped develop through these partnerships received many awards, including a National Emmy Award for best public service campaign. Ms. Rideout received a B.A. from Harvard University and an M.A. from the Maxwell School of Public Affairs at Syracuse University. Eduardo J. Sanchez, M.D., M.P.H., FAAFP, is vice president and chief medical officer for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas (BCBSTX). He previously served as director of the Institute for Health Policy at the Austin Regional Campus of the School of Public Health in the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston; prior to that, he served as commis- sioner of the Texas Department of State Health Services. As commissioner and chief health officer for the State of Texas, Dr. Sanchez led a statewide, comprehensive obesity prevention initiative and oversaw the creation of the 2006 Texas Obesity Policy Portfolio and the release of a Texas obesity cost projection comparing 2000 with 2040. He also oversaw Texas’s behavioral health programs, disease prevention and bioterrorism preparedness pro-

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131 APPENDIX B grams, family and community health services programs, and environmental and consumer safety and health-related regulatory programs. He practiced clinical medicine in Austin from 1992 to 2001 and served as health author- ity and chief medical officer for the Austin-Travis County Health and Human Services Department from 1994 to 1998. He served as chair of the IOM Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention Actions for Local Governments, and as a member of the IOM Committee on Progress in Pre- venting Childhood Obesity and the IOM Committee on a Comprehensive Review of the DHHS Office of Family Planning Title X Program. He is a current member of the IOM Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention. Dr. Sanchez received his M.D. from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, an M.P.H. from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health, and an M.S. in biomedical engineering from Duke University. He holds a B.S. in biomedical engineering and a B.A. in chemistry from Boston University. Dr. Sanchez is a fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians and is certified by the American Board of Family Medicine. Ellen Wartella, Ph.D., is Al-Thani professor of communication and profes- sor of psychology and human development and social policy at Northwest- ern University. She directs the Center on Media and Human Development in the School of Communication at Northwestern. Previously, she was distinguished professor of psychology at the University of California, River- side (UCR), where she also served as executive vice chancellor and provost. Dr. Wartella is a co-principal investigator on a 5-year, multisite research project entitled IRADS Collaborative Research: Influence of Digital Media on Very Young Children, funded by the National Science Foundation. She was a co-principal investigator for the National TV Violence Study and a co-principal investigator for the Children’s Digital Media Center project, funded by the National Science Foundation. She serves on the National Educational Advisory Board of the Children’s Advertising Review Unit of the Council of Better Business Bureaus, the board of directors for the World Summit on Media for Children Foundation, the PBS KIDS Next Generation Media Advisory Board, the board of trustees for Sesame Workshop, and advisory boards for Harvard’s Center on Media and Child Health and The Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University. Dr. Wartella is a member of the American Psychological Association and the Society for Research in Child Development and is past president of the International Communication Association. Recent honors include election as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Steven H. Chaffee Career Productivity Award from the International Communication Association. Dr. Wartella has served on the NRC/IOM Board on Children, Youth, and Families and the IOM Committee on Food Marketing and the

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132 MEASURING PROGRESS IN OBESITY PREVENTION Diets of Children and Youth. She served as chair of the IOM Committee on Examination of Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols. Dr. Wartella received a B.A. with honors in economics from the University of Pittsburgh and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in mass communications from the University of Minnesota, and completed her postdoctoral research in developmental psychology at the University of Kansas.