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Biographical Sketches of Speakers

Jamie F. Chriqui, Ph.D., M.H.S., is senior research scientist and director of policy surveillance and evaluation in the Health Policy Center within the Institute for Health Research and Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and research associate professor in political science at UIC. She has more than 21 years’ experience conducting public health policy research, evaluation, and analysis, with an emphasis on obesity, substance abuse, tobacco control, and other chronic disease-related policy issues. Dr. Chriqui has led a number of efforts to develop quantitative measures of the extensiveness of state- and local-level public health policies. Her research interests focus on examining the impact of law and policy on community and school environments as well as individual behaviors and attitudes. Her current research focuses on sugar-sweetened beverage taxation, school district wellness policies, and community policies related to the physical activity and food environments. She directs all state, local and school district policy research activities for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-supported Bridging the Gap program and is principal investigator or co-investigator on several NIH-funded research grants. She serves on numerous obesity-related advisory and expert panels and is widely called upon for her expertise in obesity policy-related issues. Before joining UIC, Dr. Chriqui served as technical vice president of the Center for Health Policy and Legislative Analysis at The MayaTech Corporation and prior to that as a policy analyst at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. She holds a B.A. in political science from Barnard College at Columbia University; an M.H.S. in health policy from the Johns Hopkins University School of



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C Biographical Sketches of Speakers Jamie F. Chriqui, Ph.D., M.H.S., is senior research scientist and director of policy surveillance and evaluation in the Health Policy Center within the Institute for Health Research and Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and research associate professor in political science at UIC. She has more than 21 years’ experience conducting public health policy research, evaluation, and analysis, with an emphasis on obesity, substance abuse, tobacco control, and other chronic disease-related policy issues. Dr. Chriqui has led a number of efforts to develop quantitative measures of the extensiveness of state- and local-level public health policies. Her research interests focus on examining the impact of law and policy on community and school environments as well as individual behaviors and attitudes. Her current research focuses on sugar-sweetened beverage taxa- tion, school district wellness policies, and community policies related to the physical activity and food environments. She directs all state, local and school district policy research activities for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-supported Bridging the Gap program and is principal investiga- tor or co-investigator on several NIH-funded research grants. She serves on numerous obesity-related advisory and expert panels and is widely called upon for her expertise in obesity policy-related issues. Before joining UIC, Dr. Chriqui served as technical vice president of the Center for Health Policy and Legislative Analysis at The MayaTech Corporation and prior to that as a policy analyst at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. She holds a B.A. in political science from Barnard College at Columbia University; an M.H.S. in health policy from the Johns Hopkins University School of 133

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134 MEASURING PROGRESS IN OBESITY PREVENTION Hygiene and Public Health; and a Ph.D. in policy sciences (health policy concentration) from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Brian Cole, Dr.P.H., is program manager and lead analyst for the Health Impact Assessment Group at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Public Health. Since 2001 he has worked with the proj- ect’s principal investigator, Jonathan Fielding, leading an interdisciplinary team in the conduct of health impact assessments (HIAs) for a wide range of public policies and projects, providing HIA training, and developing a national clearinghouse for HIA. Besides his work on HIA, Dr. Cole is engaged in a number of research projects promoting physical activity in school, workplace, and community settings. He received his Dr.P.H. degree from the UCLA School of Public Health and undergraduate degrees in envi- ronmental science and biology from Washington State University. Carlos J. Crespo, Dr.P.H., is professor and director of the School of Com- munity Health at Portland State University. His previous work experience includes working for the National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, on the planning and development of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. He also worked as a public health analyst for the Office of Prevention, Education and Control of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Crespo’s main areas of research are the epidemiology of physi- cal activity in the prevention of chronic diseases and minority health issues. He has been a contributing author to five textbooks on minority health and sports medicine and more than 10 government publications, including the surgeon general’s report on physical activity and health. Dr. Crespo received the 1997 U.S. Secretary of Health Award for Distinguished Service as part of the Salud para su Corazon campaign, and in 2003 became a minority health scholar from the National Institutes of Health. He is an emeritus board member of the American Council for Exercise and past president of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine. Currently he is a member of the National Advisory Council of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Active Living Research, director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Center in Urban and Health Sustainability, and a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine. Dr. Crespo graduated from the Inter American University of Puerto Rico, and received an M.S. in sports health from Texas Tech University and a Dr.P.H. in preventive care from the Loma Linda University. Amy A. Eyler, Ph.D., is associate research professor in the George Warren Brown School of Social Work and Prevention Research Center at Washing- ton University in St. Louis. Dr. Eyler’s main research interests are physical

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135 APPENDIX C activity, community policy and environmental interventions, and evalua- tion. She is currently principal investigator for the Physical Activity Policy Research Network (PAPRN), which is funded to study the effectiveness of policies related to increasing physical activity in communities. Studies conducted through the network include a case study on policies influencing active transportation to and from school, a study of policies influencing the development of community trails, a study of state legislation on physical education, and an analysis of bicycle/pedestrian master plans. Dr. Eyler also recently coordinated the Women’s Cardiovascular Health Network, a multi- site project conducted to study women of diverse race/ethnicity and physical activity. She is a member of the American Public Health Association and American College of Sports Medicine and is a certified health education specialist. Dr. Eyler received a master’s degree in physical education and adult fitness from Ohio University and a doctorate in public health from Oregon State University Karen Glanz, Ph.D., M.P.H., is George A. Weiss University Professor, pro- fessor of epidemiology in the School of Medicine, professor of nursing in the School of Nursing, and director of the Center for Health Behavior Research at the University of Pennsylvania. She was previously at Emory University (2004-2009), the University of Hawaii (1993-2004), and Temple University. Dr. Glanz’s research focuses include cancer prevention and con- trol; obesity, nutrition, and the built environment; chronic disease preven- tion and control; and health communication technologies. She is a member of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services, a federally appointed body that oversees the Community Guide evidence reviews. Her scholarly contributions consist of more than 300 journal articles and book chap- ters. Dr. Glanz is senior editor of Health Behavior and Health Education: Theory, Research, and Practice (Jossey-Bass Inc., 1990, 1996, 2002, 2008), a widely used text recently published in its fourth edition. She was desig- nated a highly cited author by ISIHighlyCited.com, in the top 0.5 percent of authors in her field over a 20-year period. She received her M.P.H. and Ph.D. degrees in health behavior and health education from the University of Michigan. Sonya Grier, Ph.D., M.B.A., is associate professor of marketing in the Kogod School of Business at American University. Dr. Grier conducts inter- disciplinary research on topics related to targeted marketing, the social impact of marketing, and race in the marketplace. Her current research is investigating the influence of commercial and social marketing activities on health promotion, disease prevention, and the elimination of health disparities. Focal topics include obesity prevention, digital marketing to children and adolescents, and the relationship of targeted marketing to pub-

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136 MEASURING PROGRESS IN OBESITY PREVENTION lic health. Prior to joining American University, Dr. Grier was a member of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholars program at the University of Pennsylvania. She also spent 2 years as an in-house consultant at the Federal Trade Commission, where she provided consumer research expertise as part of a presidentially mandated team examining the targeted marketing of violent movies, music, and video games to American youth. Dr. Grier has published her research in leading marketing, psy- chology, public health, and health policy journals. She received her Ph.D. in marketing from Northwestern University, where she also received her M.B.A. and undergraduate degrees. Christine Hoehner, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., is assistant professor in the Division of Public Health Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. At Wash- ington University, she is a research member in the Siteman Cancer Center Prevention and Control Program and the Prevention Research Center. Dr. Hoehner’s research interests include obesity and chronic disease prevention, as well as the elimination of health disparities across these health outcomes. Over the past 10 years, she has worked on a variety of research projects related to physical activity and the built environment in both the United States and Latin America. She has demonstrated leadership in applying diverse approaches to understand the role of non-health sectors in influenc- ing health. Currently, she is principal or co-investigator on projects funded by the American Cancer Society, the Centers for Disease Control and Pre- vention, and the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Hoehner received her Ph.D. in public health studies from Saint Louis University and her M.S.P.H. in epidemiology from Emory University. Robert C. Hornik, Ph.D., is Wilbur Schramm professor of communication and health policy at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Since 2003, he has directed the university’s National Can- cer Institute (NCI)-funded Center of Excellence in Cancer Communication Research. Previously he led an evaluation of the U.S. National Youth Anti- drug Media Campaign, as well as more than 20 evaluations of public health communication campaigns in the United States and worldwide. Dr. Hornik is the author of Development Communication, edited Public Health Com- munication: Evidence for Behavior Change, and co-edited Prediction and Change of Health Behavior. He has served on four Institute of Medicine committees. He is currently chair of the faculty senate of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Hornik received his Ph.D. in communication research from Stanford University. Laura Kettel Khan, Ph.D., is senior scientist for policy and partnerships in the Office of the Director in the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity,

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137 APPENDIX C and Obesity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia. The division is the primary public health agency working to prevent obesity and chronic diseases in the United States. Its programs focus on state health departments, communities, schools, worksites, and medical care systems. Dr. Kettel Khan serves on numerous national advisory committees related to evaluation and evidence for community environmen- tal and policy efforts. She represents the agency in its national partnerships with private foundations that focus on obesity prevention, such as the Convergence Partnership (which includes Kaiser Permanente, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the Kresge Foundation, Nemours, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and The California Endowment) and the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (which includes CDC, the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation). Dr. Kettel Khan is a primary author of the CDC Community Recommendations for Obesity Prevention and “The Systematic Screening and Assessment Method: Finding Innovations Worth Evaluating” (New Directions in Evaluation, Spring 2010, No. 10). She is currently technical advisor and director for an evaluation of New York City group daycare regulations. Dr. Kettel Khan received her Ph.D. from the University of Arizona. Susan M. Krebs-Smith, Ph.D., is chief of the Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at the National Cancer Institute. In that capacity, she oversees a program of research on the surveillance of risk factors related to cancer—including diet, physical activity, weight status, tobacco use, sun exposure, genetics, and family history; methodological issues in improving the assessment of those factors; and issues related to guidance and food policy. Her own surveillance research, using data from the National Nutrition Monitoring and Related Research Program, has emphasized trends in intake of foods and nutrients, especially fruits and vegetables; food sources of nutrients; and factors associated with the intake of foods and/or nutrients. Her con- tributions in the area of dietary assessment methodology have focused on the development of methods for assessing dietary patterns, the usual intake of foods, overall diet quality, and conformance to dietary guidelines. Her efforts in dietary guidance and food policy include evaluation of the U.S. food supply and estimation of future demand for food commodities, based on population-wide adoption of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and census projections. Dr. Krebs-Smith was a member of the drafting commit- tee for the 2005 Dietary Guidelines. She has been a member of the Advi- sory Committee for the International Conference on Dietary Assessment Methods. She has served on the editorial boards for both the Journal of the American Dietetic Association and the Journal of Nutrition Education

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138 MEASURING PROGRESS IN OBESITY PREVENTION and Behavior and on the governing council of the American Public Health Association. Dr. Krebs-Smith received an undergraduate degree in home economics from Bradley University, an M.P.H. from the University of Min- nesota, and a Ph.D. in nutrition from The Pennsylvania State University. Robert M. Malina, Ph.D., FACSM, is professor emeritus in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education at the University of Texas, Austin, and research professor in the Department of Kinesiology at Tarleton State Uni- versity, Stephenville, Texas. He taught at the University of Texas, Austin, from 1967 to 1995 and at Michigan State University from 1995 to 2002, when he retired. Combined interests in the physical activity and sport sci- ences and in biological anthropology in the context of growth and matura- tion have been a constant in his career. Although his interests are diverse, Dr. Malina’s career has focused on (1) the biological growth and maturation of children and adolescents, with an emphasis on motor development and performance, physical activity, and youth sports and young athletes; (2) the potential influence of physical activity and training for sport; and (3) the influence of chronic undernutrition and more recently the emergence of overweight in rural indigenous populations in southern Mexico. Dr. Malina served as editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Human Biology (1990- 2002), editor of the Yearbook of Physical Anthropology (1980-1986), and section editor for growth and development for the Exercise and Sport Sci- ences Reviews (1981-1999) and the Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (1981-1993). He currently serves on the editorial boards of several journals in the sport sciences and biological anthropology. Dr. Malina earned doctoral degrees in physical education (University of Wisconsin) and anthropology (University of Pennsylvania) and honorary degrees from the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium; the Bronislaw Czech University School of Physical Education in Kraków, Poland; the University School of Physical Education, Wrocław, Poland; and the University of Coimbra, Portugal. Robin McKinnon, Ph.D., M.P.A., is health policy specialist in the Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch at the National Cancer Institute. Dr. McKinnon works on activities intended to advance policy-relevant research on diet, physical activity, and weight. Her research interests focus on public policies intended to reduce obesity incidence and prevalence and include the effects of food and physical activity environments on individual diet and physical activity behavior, measurement of the food and physical activity environments, the economic effects of rising obesity rates at the population level, and evaluation of public policies that may affect diet and/ or activity behavior. Dr. McKinnon earned her Ph.D. in public policy and administration at The George Washington University in Washington, DC.

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139 APPENDIX C She also received an M.P.A. from Harvard University and a B.A. from the Australian National University. Shu Wen Ng, Ph.D., is assistant professor of nutrition at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health. As a health econo- mist, she is interested in studying the economic, social, and environmental determinants of weight gain. Understanding the U.S. food supply is an area on which she is currently focusing as part of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded evaluation of the food industry’s commitment to cutting calories from the U.S. market. Dr. Ng is working with large commercial databases to pull together detailed data on food sales and purchases and nutrition at the universal product code (UPC) level to estimate calories and macronutrients sold and purchased, how they are changing within and across food groups, and the differential responses to prices among vulner- able populations. Findings from this research will provide information on the nutritional performance of the food industry and have implications for policy making (e.g., regulation of the food industry, food assistance, nutri- tion education). Dr. Ng received a B.Sc. from Duke University and a Ph.D. in health policy and management from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Victoria Rideout, M.A., is president and founder of VJR Consulting, a private consulting firm specializing in media research and social marketing strategy. Until 2010 she served as vice president of the Kaiser Family Foun- dation and director of the foundation’s Program for the Study of Media and Health. Ms. Rideout directed more than 30 studies on topics concerning media and health, including a 10-year study tracking the evolving nature of media use among children and youth, research quantifying the amount and nature of food advertising to children on television and the Internet, surveys on teenagers’ use of the Internet for health information, content analyses of public service advertising on television, and several studies documenting the positive influence of health-related content in entertainment televi- sion. Her research has been published in peer-reviewed journals such as the Journal of the American Medical Association, Pediatrics, the Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, Health Affairs, and American Behavioral Scientist, and has been widely reported in the news media. Ms. Rideout has also negotiated partnerships with the television networks MTV, BET, and UPN, securing high-profile, multi-million-dollar donations of media time to conduct youth-oriented public education campaigns. The public service ads, original long-form programming, and online content she helped develop through these partnerships received many awards, including a National Emmy Award for best public service campaign. Ms. Rideout received a B.A.

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140 MEASURING PROGRESS IN OBESITY PREVENTION from Harvard University and an M.A. from the Maxwell School of Public Affairs at Syracuse University. Maya Rockeymoore, Ph.D., is president and CEO of Global Policy Solu- tions (GPS), a social change strategy firm based in Washington, DC. GPS offers a range of policy, program, and organizational development services to clients from the nonprofit, philanthropic, and governmental sectors. As a part of her GPS work, Dr. Rockeymoore is program director for Leadership for Healthy Communities, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) designed to support elected and appointed officials in efforts to advance policies that support healthy eating and active living. The program contributes to RWJF’s goal of reversing the childhood obesity epidemic by 2015. Dr. Rockeymoore has presented and written extensively about health disparities, childhood obesity prevention, health care reform, community-based approaches to health, and Medicaid and Medicare policy. Among her various publications, she co-authored the Action Strategies for Healthy Communities Toolkit and has published articles in the Ameri- can Journal of Preventive Medicine and the National Association of State Boards of Education’s State Education Standard examining community and school efforts to address childhood obesity. Dr. Rockeymoore is also co- editor of Strengthening Community: Social Insurance in a Diverse America (Brookings Institution Press, 2004). In addition, she serves on numerous health-related boards and advisory groups, including the National Com- mittee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare, the National Policy and Legal Analysis Network to Prevent Childhood Obesity, Salud America!, the South Carolina Rural Health Research Center Research Users Network Advisory Group, and the RWJF Environmental and Policy Working Group. A member of the National Academy of Social Insurance, Dr. Rockeymoore contributed to the development of its seminal study panel report, Strength- ening Medicare’s Role in Reducing Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, in 2006. She formerly served as vice president for research and programs at the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, senior resident scholar for health and income security at the National Urban League’s policy institute, chief of staff to Congressman Charles Rangel, professional staff on the U.S. House of Representatives Ways and Means Committee, and assistant to the director of the Marion County Health Department in Indianapolis. Dr. Rockeymoore earned her Ph.D. and M.A. in political science with an emphasis in public policy from Purdue University. James F. Sallis, Ph.D., is professor of psychology at San Diego State Uni- versity and director of Active Living Research, a program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. His primary research interests are promoting physical activity and understanding policy and environmental influences

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141 APPENDIX C on physical activity, nutrition, and obesity. He has made contributions in the areas of measurement, correlates of physical activity, intervention, and advocacy. His health improvement programs have been studied and used in health care settings, schools, universities, and companies. Dr. Sallis is the author of more than 450 scientific publications, co-author of several books, a member of the editorial boards of several journals, and one of the world’s most cited authors in the social sciences. His current focus is using research to inform policy and environmental changes that will increase physical activity and reduce childhood obesity. He is a frequent consultant to universities, health organizations, and corporations worldwide. Dr. Sallis frequently appears in major media outlets, and Time magazine identified him as an “obesity warrior.” He received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Memphis State University. Sarah Samuels, Dr.P.H., is president of Samuels & Associates, a public health evaluation, research, and policy consulting firm created in 1994. Dr. Samuels has designed philanthropic initiatives and conducted policy-related research and multisite program evaluations. Samuels & Associates has pio- neered efforts to measure and assess changes in the food and physical activ- ity environments, particularly in low-income communities. As a program officer at the Kaiser Family Foundation, Dr. Samuels was instrumental in developing major foundation initiatives, including Project LEAN, a national nutrition social marketing campaign. With Samuels & Associates, she has been lead evaluator for the California Endowment’s Healthy Eating Active Communities (HEAC) and the Central California Regional Obesity Preven- tion Program (CCROPP) initiative. She serves as co-principal investigator for several Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Healthy Eating Research awards, including the California School Nutrition Standards Study, the Child Nutrition Commodity Foods Project, the California Child Care Food Assessment, and the Evaluation of a Full Service Grocery Store in a Low Income Community. Dr. Samuels is principal investigator for a National Institutes of Health Small Business Award (SBIR) for the development of FoodBEAMS, an electronic food and beverage monitoring and reporting tool. She works as a consultant to philanthropic organizations including the Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Foundation and the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation. Dr. Samuels is a founding member of the Strategic Alliance to Promote Healthy Food and Physical Activity Environments and serves on the board of California Food Policy Advocates. She served on the Institute of Medicine Planning Committee on Community Perspectives on Obesity Prevention and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Commit- tee on Community Measures. She was a Pew health policy fellow at the Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California, San Francisco, and is a lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public

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142 MEASURING PROGRESS IN OBESITY PREVENTION Health. She received the 2005 Catherine Cowell Award from the American Public Health Association. Dr. Samuels holds a doctorate in public health from the University of California, Berkeley, and master’s degrees in nutri- tion and education from Columbia University, Teacher’s College. Roland Sturm, Ph.D., is a senior economist at RAND and professor of policy analysis at the RAND Pardee Graduate School, where he teaches econometrics in the Ph.D. program. Dr. Sturm is the author of 150 scientific publications and has regularly testified on health and health care policy in Congress and state legislatures. His current research analyzes the costs and benefits of economic and regulatory approaches to preventing obesity, increasing physical activity, and improving the diet of Americans. In the past 12 months, several hundred news reports have covered his research publications on soda taxes, the Los Angeles fast-food ban, and the social costs of excess sodium in the U.S. diet. From 1996 to 2003, Dr. Sturm directed the economic and policy research program of the joint RAND/ University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Research Center on Managed Care, and he was awarded the National Institute of Health Care Manage- ment’s award for excellence in health services research in 2001. Dr. Sturm received an M.S. in economics from the University of Florida and an M.A. in statistics and a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University.