APPENDIX D

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS

CHAIR

Jay C. Davis is the President of the Hertz Foundation, which funds graduate studies in the applied physical sciences and engineering. Davis is a nuclear physicist trained at the Universities of Texas and Wisconsin. During his three-decade career at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), he built accelerators for research in nuclear physics and for materials science in support of the fusion program. In 1988, Davis founded the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, the World’s most versatile and productive AMS laboratory, creating isotopic tracing and tagging tools for research programs in the geosciences, toxicology, nutritional sciences, oncology, archaeology, and nuclear forensics. At the time he left LLNL to join the Department of Defense (DOD) in 1998, he was the Associate Director for Earth and Environmental Sciences.

MEMBERS

George W. Anderson, Jr. received his Ph.D. in immunology from the Johns Hopkins University. He is a Registered Biosafety Professional with the American Biological Safety Association. Anderson’s research experience includes work with Rickettsia, hemorrhagic fever viruses and bacterial agents in high containment laboratories as an U.S. Army, Medical Service Corps Officer. Anderson has been involved with the Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) Program for over 10 years, including living in the former Soviet Union while engaged full time in support of the program. He was involved in facility biosafety assessments, biosafety training, laboratory renovation, equipment setup and training, laboratory sustainment operations and preparation for exercises to test the disease surveillance system and diagnostic laboratories engaged by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency in several countries. Anderson is currently the Select Agent Manager at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where he is also the Chair of the Institutional Biosafety Committee and the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee.

Steven J. Gitomer received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He joined Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 1974. He moved to the Los Alamos Center for International Security Affairs in 1995 and was a member of the Nonproliferation and International Security Division beginning in 1993, where his responsibilities included serving as an U.S. member of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC), Senior Science Advisor to the U. S. Department of State for the Science and Technology Center in Ukraine (STCU), and principal Los Alamos point-of-contact for the ISTC, STCU, and lab-to-lab interactions with the former Soviet Union. From 1991 to 1993, Gitomer served at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Arms Control in Washington D.C., where his work focused on implementation of the Threshold Test Ban Treaty and the establishment of the science and technology centers in Russia and Ukraine. Dr. Gitomer retired from LANL in 2005 and became a part-time senior scientist with the U.S. Civilian Research and Development Foundation, he continued his nonproliferation



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APPENDIX D BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS CHAIR Jay C. Davis is the President of the Hertz Foundation, which funds graduate studies in the applied physical sciences and engineering. Davis is a nuclear physicist trained at the Universities of Texas and Wisconsin. During his three-decade career at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), he built accelerators for research in nuclear physics and for materials science in support of the fusion program. In 1988, Davis founded the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, the World’s most versatile and productive AMS laboratory, creating isotopic tracing and tagging tools for research programs in the geosciences, toxicology, nutritional sciences, oncology, archaeology, and nuclear forensics. At the time he left LLNL to join the Department of Defense (DOD) in 1998, he was the Associate Director for Earth and Environmental Sciences. MEMBERS George W. Anderson, Jr. received his Ph.D. in immunology from the Johns Hopkins University. He is a Registered Biosafety Professional with the American Biological Safety Association. Anderson’s research experience includes work with Rickettsia, hemorrhagic fever viruses and bacterial agents in high containment laboratories as an U.S. Army, Medical Service Corps Officer. Anderson has been involved with the Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) Program for over 10 years, including living in the former Soviet Union while engaged full time in support of the program. He was involved in facility biosafety assessments, biosafety training, laboratory renovation, equipment setup and training, laboratory sustainment operations and preparation for exercises to test the disease surveillance system and diagnostic laboratories engaged by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency in several countries. Anderson is currently the Select Agent Manager at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where he is also the Chair of the Institutional Biosafety Committee and the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Steven J. Gitomer received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He joined Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 1974. He moved to the Los Alamos Center for International Security Affairs in 1995 and was a member of the Nonproliferation and International Security Division beginning in 1993, where his responsibilities included serving as an U.S. member of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC), Senior Science Advisor to the U. S. Department of State for the Science and Technology Center in Ukraine (STCU), and principal Los Alamos point-of-contact for the ISTC, STCU, and lab-to-lab interactions with the former Soviet Union. From 1991 to 1993, Gitomer served at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Arms Control in Washington D.C., where his work focused on implementation of the Threshold Test Ban Treaty and the establishment of the science and technology centers in Russia and Ukraine. Dr. Gitomer retired from LANL in 2005 and became a part-time senior scientist with the U.S. Civilian Research and Development Foundation, he continued his nonproliferation 101

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102 IMPROVING METRICS FOR THE DOD CTR PROGRAM work, adding Iraqi scientist interactions to his portfolio. In 2009, he was appointed as the National Science Foundation program director for plasma physics. Mary Alice Hayward is Vice President for Strategy, Government and International Affairs at AREVA Inc. in North America. Previously she was Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy and Negotiations in the Department of State’s Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation. Her portfolio included preventing the smuggling of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and their delivery systems, implementing international threat reduction programs, developing nuclear nonproliferation policies, tracking, controlling, and securing dangerous materials, including fissile and radiological materials and pathogens, conducting multilateral arms control, nonproliferation, and WMD terrorism negotiations, and developing and shaping nuclear energy policy. Ms. Hayward also served at the U.S. General Accountability Office, the Senate Armed Services Committee, the Department of Energy and the National Security Council where her portfolios focused on reviewing, evaluating and developing policies for the Cooperative Threat Reduction program for the states of the former Soviet Union. Mark F. Mullen is a project manager in the Nuclear Nonproliferation Division at LANL. He currently serves as the National Technical Director for the Materials Protection, Accounting and the Control (MPC&A) Technology Program, supporting the Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy. He previously served as Assistant Director, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, Department of Homeland Security, where he led the Systems Architecture directorate. He has more than 30 years of experience in nuclear nonproliferation, WMD threat reduction, homeland security, domestic and international nuclear safeguards and security, and nuclear safety and regulatory issues. Mr. Mullen was deeply involved in early U.S.-Russian cooperative threat reduction programs beginning in 1992, and was one of the principal architects of DOE’s laboratory-to-laboratory MPC&A program, which sparked a rapid expansion in U.S.-Russian MPC&A cooperation in the mid-1990s. Gregory S. Parnell is a professor of systems engineering at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and is now on sabbatical as a Distinguished Visiting Professor at the U.S. Air Force Academy. His research focuses on decision analysis, risk analysis, resource allocation, and systems engineering for defense; intelligence; homeland security; research and development; and environmental applications. He is Chairman of the Board and a senior principal with Innovative Decisions, Inc., an analytics consulting firm. Parnell is a former president of the Decision Analysis Society of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS) and of the Military Operations Research Society (MORS). He has also served as editor of Journal of Military Operations Research. Parnell has published more than 100 papers and book chapters and has co-edited Decision Making for Systems Engineering and Management, Wiley Series in Systems Engineering (2nd Ed, Wiley and Sons, 2011). He has received several professional awards, including the U.S. Army Dr. Wilbur B. Payne Memorial Award for Excellence in Analysis, MORS Clayton Thomas Laureate, two INFORMS Koopman Prizes, and the MORS Rist Prize. He chaired the NRC Committee on Methodological Improvements to the Department of Homeland Security's Biological Agent Risk Analysis (2008). He is a fellow of MORS, INFORMS, the International Committee for Systems Engineering, and the Society for Decision Professionals. He received his B.S. in aerospace engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo, his M.E. in industrial and systems engineering from the University of

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APPENDIX D: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS 103 Florida, his M.S. in systems management from the University of Southern California, his Ph.D. in engineering-economic systems from Stanford University. Parnell is a retired Air Force Colonel and a graduate of the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. Kim Kavrell Savit is currently a consulting employee for Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) and has been an Adjunct Professor at the University of Denver Graduate School of International Studies. Savit retired in May 2006 from her position as the Senior Professional Staff Member for the Middle East, Central and South Asia on the Majority Staff of the United States Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Prior to the SFRC, Savit served in the U.S. State Department as the Deputy Coordinator for Security and Law Enforcement Assistance to Europe and Eurasia (Acting- 2002-2003) and as the Director for Security and Law Enforcement Assistance to the New Independent States of the former Soviet Union (1995-2002). Savit also served in the U.S. Department of Defense as the Director of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program for the Office of the Secretary of Defense (1991-1995), Country Desk Officer for Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, Libya, Iran and Iraq, Near East and South Asian Affairs Bureau and as a Budget Analyst for the DoD Comptroller. She received her MA Degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. Savit serves as an Advisory Board Member for the Rocky Mountain Region Institute of International Education and as the Chair of the Denver World Affairs Council. Nicolas van de Walle is a non-resident fellow at the Center for Global Development and is the John S. Knight Professor of International Studies and the Director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies at Cornell University. van de Walle has worked extensively as a consultant for a variety of international and multilateral organizations, including the World Bank, U.S. Agency for International Development, and United Nations Development Programme. His latest book is a Center for Global Development publication Overcoming Stagnation in Aid- Dependent Countries.

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