Appendix B

Biographical Information:
Committee on Challenges and
Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences

George M. Hornberger, Chair, NAE, is Distinguished University Professor at Vanderbilt University, where he is the Director of the Vanderbilt Institute for Energy and the Environment. He has a shared appointment as the Craig E. Philip Professor of Engineering and as professor of earth and environmental sciences. He previously was a professor at the University of Virginia for many years, where he held the Ernest H. Ern Chair of Environmental Sciences. His research is aimed at understanding complex water-energy-climate interrelationships and at how hydrologic processes affect the transport of dissolved and suspended constituents through catchments and aquifers. Dr. Hornberger is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), of the Geological Society of America, and the Association for Women in Science. He has served on numerous boards and committees of the National Academies, including as chair of the Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources (1996-2000) and the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (2003-2009). He currently is a member of the Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB). Dr. Hornberger received his B.S. and M.S. from Drexel University and his Ph.D. in hydrology from Stanford University.

Emily S. Bernhardt is an associate professor at Duke University in the Department of Biology and the Nicholas School of the Environment. Dr. Bernhardt holds a B.S. in biology from the University of North Carolina (UNC), Chapel Hill, and a Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from Cornell University. A biogeochemist, her research program is fundamentally concerned with understanding how nutrient cycles are changing as a result



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Appendix B Biographical Information: Committee on Challenges and Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences George M. Hornberger, Chair, NAE, is Distinguished University Profes- sor at Vanderbilt University, where he is the Director of the Vanderbilt Institute for Energy and the Environment. He has a shared appointment as the Craig E. Philip Professor of Engineering and as professor of earth and environmental sciences. He previously was a professor at the Univer- sity of Virginia for many years, where he held the Ernest H. Ern Chair of Environmental Sciences. His research is aimed at understanding complex water-energy-climate interrelationships and at how hydrologic processes affect the transport of dissolved and suspended constituents through catch- ments and aquifers. Dr. Hornberger is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), of the Geological Society of America, and the Association for Women in Science. He has served on numerous boards and commit- tees of the National Academies, including as chair of the Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources (1996-2000) and the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (2003-2009). He currently is a member of the Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB). Dr. Hornberger received his B.S. and M.S. from Drexel University and his Ph.D. in hydrology from Stanford University. Emily S. Bernhardt is an associate professor at Duke University in the Department of Biology and the Nicholas School of the Environment. Dr. Bernhardt holds a B.S. in biology from the University of North Carolina (UNC), Chapel Hill, and a Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from Cornell University. A biogeochemist, her research program is fundamentally concerned with understanding how nutrient cycles are changing as a result 183

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184 CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN THE HYDROLOGIC SCIENCES of human-accelerated environmental change, and also how (and whether) effective ecosystem management or restoration can reverse these trends. Most of her research is focused on stream and wetland ecosystems within urban and agricultural landscapes. Dr. Bernhardt was the coordinator of the National River Restoration Science Synthesis and served as a member of the Ecological Society of America's Visions committee. She currently serves on the External Advisory Board for the Southeastern Division of Environmental Defense, the Science Advisory Board of the Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology, and as a consultant to the Sierra Club, Earth Justice, and the Southern Environmental Law Center on issues related to water quality degradation and river and wetland restora- tion and mitigation. William E. Dietrich, NAS, is a professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Science at the University of California, Berkeley. He also has an appointment in the Department of Geography and the Earth Sciences Divi- sion of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and is affiliated with the Archeological Research Facility. He is co-founder of the National Cen- ter for Airborne Laser Mapping and a member of the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics. His Berkeley-based research group is focusing on mechanistic, quantitative understanding of the form and evolution of land- scapes and the linkages between ecological and geomorphic processes. He has numerous publications and honors, including being named a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, both in 2003. Dr. Dietrich received his B.A. from Occi- dental College, and his M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Washington. Dara Entekhabi is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environ- mental Engineering and the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Plan- etary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests are in the basic understanding of coupled surface, subsurface, and atmospheric hydrologic systems that may form the bases for enhanced hydrologic predictability. More specifically, his current research is in land- atmosphere interactions, remote sensing, physical hydrology, operational hydrology, hydrometeorology, groundwatersurface water interaction, and hillslope hydrology. He was founding chair of the WSTB's Committee on Hydrologic Science, and has served on the WSTB and the Committee to Assess the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Ser- vice Initiative program. He received his B.A. and M.A. degrees from Clark University and his Ph.D. degree in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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APPENDIX B 185 Graham E. Fogg is professor of hydrogeology in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources at the University of California, Davis. His research interests include groundwater contaminant transport; groundwater basin characterization and management; geologic and geostatistical characteriza- tion of subsurface heterogeneity for improved pollutant transport modeling; numerical modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport; the role of molecular diffusion in contaminant transport and remediation; long- term sustainability of regional groundwater quality; and vulnerability of aquifers to non-point-source groundwater contaminants. He was the 2002 Birdsall-Dreiss Distinguished Lecturer awarded by the Geological Society of America Hydrogeology Division. Dr. Fogg co-developed the graduate program in hydrologic sciences at the University of California, Davis, using the 1991 National Research Council (NRC) report Opportunities in the Field of Hydrologic Sciences as a reference. He currently serves as the chair of the program. Dr. Fogg received his B.S. in hydrology from the University of New Hampshire, his M.S. in hydrology from the University of Arizona, and his Ph.D. in geology from the University of Texas at Austin. Efi Foufoula-Georgiou is the University of Minnesota's McKnight Distin- guished Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering and the Joseph T. and Rose S. Ling Chair in Environmental Engineering. She is Director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center "National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics" and has served as director of St. Anthony Falls Laboratory at the University of Minnesota. Her area of research is hydrology and geomorphology, with special interest in scaling theories, multiscale dynamics, and space-time modeling of precipitation and landforms. She has served as associate editor of Water Resources Research, the Journal of Geophysical Research, Advances in Water Resources, and Hydrologic and Earth System Sciences, and as editor of the Journal of Hydrometeorology. She has also served as chair-elect of the Board of Direc- tors of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. and as member of national and international advisory boards, including the WSTB, NSF, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and European Union advisory panels, and in several NRC studies. Dr. Foufoula-Georgiou is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the American Meteorologi- cal Society and an elected member of the European Academy of Sciences. She received a diploma in civil engineering from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of Florida. William J. Gutowski, Jr., is professor of meteorology in the Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences at Iowa State University. His re-

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186 CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN THE HYDROLOGIC SCIENCES search is focused on the role of atmospheric dynamics in climate, with emphasis on the dynamics of the hydrologic cycle and regional climate. Dr. Gutowski's research program entails a variety of modeling and data analy- sis approaches to capture the necessary spatial and temporal scales of these dynamics and involves working through the Regional Climate Modeling Laboratory at Iowa State University. His work also includes regional model- ing of Arctic, African, and East Asian climates and involves collaboration with scientists in these regions. He served on the NRC's Committee on Cli- mate Change and U.S. Transportation. Dr. Gutowski is a Lead Author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change FifthAssessment Report and was a Contributing Author on the Third and Fourth Assessment Re- ports. He was also a member of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program panels (2005-2008). Dr. Gutowski received a Ph.D. in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a B.S. in astronomy and physics from Yale University. W. Berry Lyons is a professor and the Director of the School of Earth Sci- ences at The Ohio State University. Previously he was a faculty member at the University of New Hampshire, the University of Nevada, Reno, and the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. He served as The Ohio State University Director of the Byrd Polar Research Center from 1999 to 2009. Dr. Lyons' research interests include environmental geochemistry of trace metals, such as mercury; the causes and rates of chemical weathering and landscape change; the dynamics of carbon in the terrestrial environment; the role of agriculture and urbanization on water resources; and the impact of climate change on polar ecosystems. Dr. Lyons is a fellow of the Geological Society of America, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the AGU. He is a past member of the NRC's Polar Research Board, and past chair of the NRC Committee on Designing an Arctic Observing Network. Dr. Lyons received a B.A. from Brown University, and an M.Sc. and Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut. Kenneth W. Potter is a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Potter's teaching and research interests include hydrology and water resources, including hydrologic mod- eling, estimation of hydrologic risk, estimation of hydrologic budgets, watershed monitoring and assessment, and hydrologic restoration. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the AGU, and a Woodrow Wilson fellow. Dr. Potter is a past member of the WSTB and has served on many of its committees, including the stand- ing Committee on Hydrologic Science. He received his B.S. in geology from Louisiana State University and his Ph.D. in geography and environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University.

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APPENDIX B 187 Scott W. Tyler is a professor in the Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering at the University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Tyler's areas of focus span the wide range of arid region hydrology, with particular interest in bridging the gap between hydrogeology and soil physics in the newly emerging area of vadose zone hydrology. His work has long been focused on studies of moisture flux and groundwater recharge in arid environments. Recently, his group has been developing fiber-optic temperature sensing (DTS) to a wide range of environmental and hydrologic questions, in col- laboration with researchers from Oregon State University, the U.S. Geologi- cal Survey, and the University of Delft. Dr. Tyler has focused on educating U.S. students on the problems and issues faced by citizens of developing countries with respect to safe drinking water. He leads volunteer graduate and undergraduate trips to Chile, Haiti, and, soon, to West Africa to train local villagers in well drilling and well repair. Dr. Tyler received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Connecticut, his M.S. in hydrology from the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and his Ph.D. in hydrology/hydrogeology from the University of Nevada, Reno. Henry J. Vaux, Jr., is Professor Emeritus of Resource Economics at the University of California in both Berkley and Riverside. He is also Associ- ate Vice President Emeritus of the University of California system. He also previously served as director of California's Center for Water Resources. His principal research interests are the economics of water use, water qual- ity, and water marketing. Prior to joining the University of California, he worked at the Office of Management and Budget and served on the staff of the National Water Commission. Dr. Vaux has served on the NRC commit- tees on Assessment of Water Resources Research, Western Water Manage- ment, Ground Water Recharge, and Sustainable Underground Storage of Recoverable Water. He was chair of the WSTB from 1994 to 2001. He is a National Associate of the National Academies. Dr. Vaux received an A.B. from the University of California, Davis, in biological sciences, an M.A. in natural resource administration, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. Claire Welty is the director of the Center for Urban Environmental Research and Education and Professor of Environmental Engineering at University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). Dr. Welty's work has primarily focused on transport processes in aquifers; her current research interest is in watershed-scale urban hydrology, particularly in urban groundwa- ter. Prior to her appointment at UMBC in 2003, Dr. Welty was a faculty member at Drexel University for 15 years, where she taught hydrology and also served as Associate Director of the School of Environmental Science, Engineering, and Policy. Dr. Welty is past chair of the WSTB and has previ- ously served on several NRC study committees, including serving as chair

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188 CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN THE HYDROLOGIC SCIENCES of the Committee on Reducing Stormwater Discharge Contributions to Water Pollution. Dr. Welty received a B.A. in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia, an M.S. in environmental engineering from the George Washington University, and a Ph.D. degree in civil and environmen- tal engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Connie A. Woodhouse is an associate professor in the School of Geography and Development at the University of Arizona, with joint appointments in the Department of Geosciences and Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research. Previously, she was a physical scientist at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center, Paleoclimatology Branch. Her primary research focuses on climatic and hydrologic conditions of the past 2000 years in western North America and uses tree rings to develop reconstructions of past hydrology. Another key research interest is the application of scientific information and data to resource management. Dr. Woodhouse has served on several boards and panels, including the U.S. National Committee of the International Quaternary Association, an NSF review panel, and an NRC study of the management of the Colorado River, and is an associate editor for the jour- nal Dendrochronologia. Dr. Woodhouse received a B.A. in environmental education from Prescott (Arizona) College, an M.S. in geography from the University of Utah, and a Ph.D. in geosciences from the University of Arizona. Chunmiao Zheng is currently the George Lindahl III Endowed Professor of Hydrogeology in the Department of Geological Sciences at the Univer- sity of Alabama. He is also Chair Professor and Director of the Center for Water Research at Peking University in Beijing, China. The primary areas of his research are contaminant transport, groundwater management, and hydrologic modeling. He is developer of the widely used MT3DMS contaminant transport model and co-author of the textbook Applied Con- taminant Transport Modeling published by Wiley in 1995 and 2002 and translated into Chinese in 2009. He was recipient of the John Hem Excel- lence in Science and Engineering Award from the National Ground Water Association in 1998 and a fellow of the Geological Society of America since 1999. He received the Birdsall-Dreiss Distinguished Lecturer award from the Geological Society of America in 2009 that took him to 70 universities and research institutions worldwide. He has served as associate editor for leading hydrology journals, including Water Resources Research, Ground Water, the Journal of Hydrology, and Hydrogeology Journal. Currently, he is a member of the Standing Committee on Hydrologic Science of the Na- tional Research Council, and president of the International Commission on Groundwater of the International Association of Hydrologic Sciences. He received a Ph.D. in hydrogeology with a minor in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1988.