B

Speaker Biographies

Joel Ackelsberg, M.D., M.P.H., is a medical epidemiologist and Bioterrorism Surveillance Coordinator for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s (NYC DOHMH’s) Bureau of Communicable Disease (BCD). After completing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) in 2000, Dr. Ackelsberg came to NYC DOHMH as Medical Director of the Emergency Readiness and Response Unit, which coordinated key aspects of the agency’s biological emergency preparedness and response planning. At various times during the past decade, he has overseen development and evolution of NYC DOHMH’s Health Alert Network; hospital public health emergency preparedness activities; surveillance and epidemiologic response planning for biological emergencies locally and regionally; planning and readiness for joint investigations with local and federal law enforcement of suspected or confirmed biological threat agent incidents; and coordination of biodetection (e.g., BioWatch) activities, including management of projects that specifically addressed biosecurity in the NYC subway and commuter rail systems. These activities have included significant participation in interagency efforts to coordinate planning at all government levels. Most recently, Dr. Ackelsberg has coordinated the development of NYC DOHMH’s biological threat agent response plan, including biological incident and functional annexes. Dr. Ackelsberg has taken part in all NYC DOHMH emergency responses to suspected or confirmed biological incidents over the past decade, including anthrax, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and pandemic influenza. He is a member of NYC’s Joint Terrorism Task Force. Dr. Ackelsberg received his medical and public health degrees



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B Speaker Biographies Joel Ackelsberg, M.D., M.P.H., is a medical epidemiologist and Bioter- rorism Surveillance Coordinator for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s (NYC DOHMH’s) Bureau of Communica- ble Disease (BCD). After completing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) in 2000, Dr. Ackelsberg came to NYC DOHMH as Medical Director of the Emergency Readiness and Response Unit, which coordinated key aspects of the agency’s biological emergency preparedness and response plan- ning. At various times during the past decade, he has overseen develop- ment and evolution of NYC DOHMH’s Health Alert Network; hospital public health emergency preparedness activities; surveillance and epide- miologic response planning for biological emergencies locally and re- gionally; planning and readiness for joint investigations with local and federal law enforcement of suspected or confirmed biological threat agent incidents; and coordination of biodetection (e.g., BioWatch) activi- ties, including management of projects that specifically addressed biose- curity in the NYC subway and commuter rail systems. These activities have included significant participation in interagency efforts to coordi- nate planning at all government levels. Most recently, Dr. Ackelsberg has coordinated the development of NYC DOHMH’s biological threat agent response plan, including biological incident and functional annex- es. Dr. Ackelsberg has taken part in all NYC DOHMH emergency re- sponses to suspected or confirmed biological incidents over the past decade, including anthrax, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and pandemic influenza. He is a member of NYC’s Joint Terrorism Task Force. Dr. Ackelsberg received his medical and public health degrees 79

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80 BIOSURVEILLANCE INFORMATION SHARING AND COLLABORATION from Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts. He completed an inter- nal medicine residency at Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and followed that with subspecialty training in infectious diseases at the University Medical Center/Cooper Hospital in Camden, New Jersey. He completed his 2-year EIS fellowship with the New York State Department of Health (Albany, New York) in its Bureau of Com- municable Disease Control. Joseph Annelli, D.V.M., M.S., is currently the Senior Advisor for Agri- culture and Health Systems, or “One Health Coordinator” for short, lo- cated in the Office of the Deputy Administrator for Veterinary Services (VS) at the Department of Agriculture (USDA), where he leads their One Health Coordination Office and assists VS and USDA in implementing the One Health principles of applying an interdisciplinary approach and joint strategies to resolve issues at the human-animal-ecosystem interface to improve both human and animal health. The core of Dr. Anelli’s work involves providing senior level leadership and coordination for USDA, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), and VS’s One Health Working Groups. These working groups are responsible for coor- dinating strategic policy, plans and actions for all USDA agencies and offices as they relate to the interrelationships of the human-animal- ecosystem interface and its impact on agriculture and public health. Prior to this, Dr. Annelli was Director of Emergency Programs for VS when he and his staff activated National Disaster Medical System resources to assist in an avian influenza outbreak in Virginia and deployed 350 veter- inarians to the United Kingdom to assist with a major foot and mouth disease outbreak. He was also instrumental in rewriting ESF-11 of the National Response Plan to include care of pets in disasters. At the begin- ning of the global concerns for highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza and the possibility of an emerging pandemic, Dr. Annelli was detailed to the Office of the Secretary as liaison to the White House Homeland Se- curity Council on Avian Influenza issues for USDA, and also served as Director of the International Avian Influenza Coordination Center before returning to VS in his current position. He was ideally positioned to con- tinue in this role through the 2009-H1N1 influenza pandemic, building upon the networks and partnerships developed through the National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza and the response to highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza. Dr. Annelli attended veterinary school at Araneta University in the Philippines and completed his studies at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville and received his second master’s degree in

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81 APPENDIX B veterinary epidemiology and public health at the University of Minneso- ta. His first master’s degree is in ecology and oceanography from Long Island University’s C.W. Post Campus in Greenvale, New York. Isaac Ashkenazi, M.D., is an international expert on disaster manage- ment and leadership, community resilience, and mass casualty events with both extensive professional and academic experience. He is consid- ered one of the world’s foremost experts in medical preparedness for complex emergencies and disasters. Dr. Ashkenazi is the Director of the Urban Terrorism Preparedness Project at the National Preparedness Leadership Initiative, Harvard School of Public Health, a joint program of the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He is also a Professor of Disaster Medicine at Ben-Gurion University in Israel and a consultant to Harvard University, CDC, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the U.S. De- partment of Homeland Security (DHS), and other national and interna- tional agencies. Dr. Ashkenazi is the former head of the Medical Services and Supply Center for the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) and served as the Surgeon General for the IDF Home Front Command. He received his M.D. degree, summa cum laude, from the Hebrew Universi- ty in Jerusalem and, in 1982, Dr. Ashkenazi volunteered to the para- trooper forces in the IDF as a military doctor. After 4 years of intensive military training, treating wounded soldiers and working under fire, Dr. Ashkenazi started his residency in ophthalmology at Sheba Medical Cen- ter. In 1992, he received a license to practice ophthalmology, from the Israeli Medical Association. One year later, he received his M.Sc. in oph- thalmology, summa cum laude, from the Faculty of Medicine at Tel- Aviv University. In 2000, he went on a sabbatical to Boston, Massachu- setts, where he received an M.P.A. (master of public administration) from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Subsequently he received a master’s degree (summa cum laude) in na- tional security from Haifa University. Over the past 20 years, Dr. Ashke- nazi has become increasingly interested in disaster management and has served in humanitarian missions in Asia, Africa, South America, and Eu- rope. He has given courses in disaster medicine, disaster management, crisis leadership, urban terrorism, preparedness and response for mass casualty events, and individual and community resilience. He has pub- lished more than two hundred papers in medical and scientific journals, and presented his work in the United States, South America, Africa, Eu- rope, Asia, and Middle East countries. In the last 15 years, Dr. Ashkenazi

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82 BIOSURVEILLANCE INFORMATION SHARING AND COLLABORATION has received Presidential Medals of Honor for Humanitarian Assistance from Turkey and Greece; the President of Rwanda; the Jewish Commu- nity in France, Turkey, Italy, and the United States; and the UJC. Christopher Braden, M.D., is a medical epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He currently serves as the Director, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseas- es. Previously, Dr. Braden has served as the Associate Director for Sci- ence in the Division of Parasitic Diseases, and Chief, Outbreak Response and Surveillance within the Enteric Diseases Epidemiology Branch, Di- vision of Foodborne, Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases. Dr. Braden also served as a medical epidemiologist in the Division of Tuberculosis Elim- ination. Dr. Braden earned his B.S. at Cornell University and M.D. at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. He completed his intern- ship and residency in internal medicine then fellowship in infectious dis- eases at Tufts New England Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts. He went onto become an Epidemic Intelligence Officer at CDC in 1993. He is a commissioned officer in the U.S. Public Health Service, a mem- ber of the American Society for Microbiology, and an associate editor for the Emerging Infectious Diseases journal. His major areas of interest in- clude molecular epidemiology of infectious diseases, infectious diseases surveillance and outbreak investigation, and national programs in food and water safety. Cory M. Bryant, Ph.D., currently leads food defense international out- reach efforts and intentional contamination regulatory development un- der the Food Safety Modernization Act. In 2009, he served as an outbreak response coordinator and Acting Team Leader of the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition’s (CFSAN’s) emergency response team. Prior to joining FDA (2003-2008), Dr. Bryant held the position of Senior Research Scientist with the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) in Washington, DC. Focus areas included scientific review, allergen cross-contamination control, and food defense. From 2000 to 2003, he served as a research investigator with International Flavors and Fra- grances in Union Beach, New Jersey, where his research yielded five patents for encapsulation systems. Dr. Bryant holds B.S. and M.S. de- grees in food science from Purdue University and a doctorate in food science from the University of Massachusetts. He was awarded a Certifi- cate in International Food Law from Michigan State University in 2006.

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83 APPENDIX B Jere Dick, D.V.M., is the Associate Deputy Administrator (ADA) and Chief of U.S. Field Operations for the Animal and Plant Health Inspec- tion Service (APHIS), Veterinary Services (VS). In this critical position, he leads APHIS’s effort to protect, sustain, and improve the productivity, marketability, and health of the nation’s animals, animal products, and biologics. Moreover, Dr. Dick plays an integral role in protecting the nation from the introduction of dangerous and costly pests and disease by cooperating closely with states, foreign governments, industry, and other organizations to ensure that APHIS fulfills its vital mission of safeguard- ing American agriculture. Before becoming the ADA for Field Opera- tions, Dr. Dick served as the ADA for National Animal Health Programs and Policy (NAHPP) Staff. His responsibilities included oversight of all of VS’s disease control and eradication programs. Prior to that, he served in several management positions in the eastern region, up to and includ- ing director. Dr. Dick possesses the field experience that is necessary to balance his perspectives: he has served as Area Veterinarian in Charge, Area Epidemiologist, and Field Veterinary Medical Officer in the past, as well as Incident Commander and Regional Incident Commander on two different disease eradication campaigns. Dr. Dick began his VS career as a field Veterinary Medical Officer in Helena, Montana, in 1988, after owning and operating two private veterinary practices in the State of Washington for nearly 10 years. Joseph Gibson, Ph.D., designs and directs studies and program evalua- tions; designs and implements analytic systems and tools for use for the Marion County Public Health Department (MCHD) and the community; collaborates in research with faculty at several universities; and directs the Epidemiology group in similar work. His experience includes leading research teams for creating new lines of research, running a multi- million-dollar study, serving as scientific lead on a variety of projects, and creating an outcomes tracking and reporting system for disease man- agement programs in 12 disease states for clients representing 9,400,000 lives. Dr. Gibson’s areas of expertise include maternal and child health issues, access to health care among Medicaid and uninsured populations, schizophrenia, medical and pharmacy claims database analyses regarding both health care costs and utilization, and secondary data analysis. Much of Dr. Gibson’s focus has been on public health informatics and prepared- ness. He has also developed an increasingly broad, standardized analytic system of datasets and tools within MCHD, and introduced a user-friendly analysis tool that is gaining enthusiastic use among MCHD administrators.

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84 BIOSURVEILLANCE INFORMATION SHARING AND COLLABORATION He has experience is programming and development of systems ranging from a real time, mainframe processing system for huge volumes of phar- macy claims to simple web-based information systems. Lisa E. Gordon-Hagerty, M.S. (standing committee), is president and chief executive officer of LEG Inc., a consulting firm providing strategic advice and counsel in domestic and national security, global energy issues, counterterrorism, crisis and consequence management, strategic planning and assessment, and homeland security. Since 2003, Mrs. Gordon-Hagerty served as executive vice president and chief operating officer of USEC Inc., a leading supplier of enriched uranium fuel for commercial nuclear power plants. In that role, she was responsible for USEC’s day-to-day operations. In 1998, Mrs. Gordon-Hagerty joined the White House Na- tional Security Council (NSC) staff, as director for combating terrorism, overseeing and coordinating U.S. government activities to deter, disrupt, prevent, and respond fully to conventional, chemical, biological, radio- logical, and nuclear terrorist attacks. Prior to joining the White House NSC staff, Mrs. Gordon-Hagerty served for 6 years as the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy’s (DOE’s) Director, Office of Emergency Response, leading efforts for emergency preparedness and technical/operational emergency response to all radiological or nuclear events, and as Acting Director, Office of Weapons Surety, responsible for the safety and secu- rity of the country’s nuclear weapons program. Prior to DOE, she served as a professional staff member of the U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Energy and Commerce. Mrs. Gordon-Hagerty began her professional career as a physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Mrs. Gordon-Hagerty holds a master’s degree in health physics and a bachelor of science degree, both from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She serves as a Director of Independence Federal Savings Bank, Federation of American Scientists and Boys and Girls Club of Greater Washington, DC. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Advisory Board of Scripps Institution of Oceanogra- phy, Economic Club of Washington, DC, and Washington Institute of Foreign Affairs. Mrs. Gordon-Hagerty has been named to Fortune Mag- azine’s “Most Powerful Women” in 2004, 2005, and 2006. Matthew Hepburn, M.D., is an active duty U.S. Army infectious dis- eases physician, currently serving on detail to the National Security Staff. Dr. Hepburn’s prior assignments have included two assignments at the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

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85 APPENDIX B (USAMRIID) directing domestic and international clinical studies, Chief Medical Officer at Level II clinic in Camp Taji (Iraq), and liaison officer to Defence Science and Technology Laboratories (United Kingdom). Prior to these assignments, Dr. Hepburn was stationed at Brooke Army Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston Texas for residency training in in- ternal medicine, chief residency, and fellowship training in infectious diseases. Dr. Hepburn received his medical degree from Duke University. Selwyn Jamison is currently serving as the Program Manager for Bioter- rorism Prevention in the Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). He provides the FBI position dur- ing Interagency Policy Committee (IPC), subIPC, and working group level meetings and ensures their equities and interests are represented. He comes to the FBI from Science Applications International Corpora- tion (SAIC) where he provided subject matter expertise, thought leader- ship, and strategic planning to support a wide range of actions in support of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) primarily in the area of national nuclear weapons accident and incident response policy, plan- ning, requirements, training, and interagency coordination, with specific expertise in Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction (CWMD). Prior to that position he served over 20 years in the U.S. Army. Bob Kadlec, M.D., spent 26 years as a career officer and physician in the U.S. Air Force serving in several senior positions in the White House, the U.S. Senate and the Department of Defense (DOD). Most recently, Dr. Kadlec served as the Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Biodefense Policy on the Homeland Security Coun- cil. He also served as staff director for Senator Richard Burr’s sub- committee on bioterrorism and public health in the 109th Congress. In this capacity, he was instrumental in drafting the Pandemic and All- Hazard Preparedness Bill that was signed into law. Dr. Kadlec also pre- viously served at the White House from 2002 to 2005 as a director for biodefense on the Homeland Security Council where he was responsible for conducting the biodefense end-to-end assessment, which culminated in drafting the National Biodefense Policy for the 21st Century. Dr. Kadlec holds a bachelor’s degree from the United States Air Force Academy, doc- torate of medicine, and master’s of tropical medicine and hygiene from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and master’s degree in national security studies from Georgetown University.

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86 BIOSURVEILLANCE INFORMATION SHARING AND COLLABORATION Donald Kautter, Jr., M.S., began his career as a project microbiologist at the National Food Processors Association, (NFPA). His government career began 16 years ago with the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN), where he held several positions. In his first, as a Consumer Safety Officer, Mr. Kautter provided technical support to the Division of Field Programs Director in establishing hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP) concepts in Agency programs; provided technical assistance in the development of model HACCP systems for Agency programs, initia- tives, and regulations; technical support for the Agency in food microbi- ology and thermal processing policies, standards, procedures, and guidelines, and acted as primary reviewer of regulatory compliance ac- tivities and microbial issues submitted to FDA. His most recent post at CFSAN was as Deputy Director, Office of Compliance (OC), where he also served as one of the focal points between the Center and the field through interaction with the Office of Regulatory Affairs and the Office of Enforcements. Prior to his position in OC, Mr. Kautter served as the team leader of CFSAN’s Food Defense Oversight Team, where he pro- vided technical support in establishing food defense concepts in Agency programs; oversight and leadership in the development of vulnerability assessments for Agency programs. He was also the primary coordinator of the FDA portion of the DHS document, “National Infrastructure Pro- tection Plan” (NIPP). He was selected to lead the FDA portion of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)/Department of Homeland Security (DHS)/Department of Agriculture (USDA) joint initiative, the Strategic Partnership Program on Agroterrorism, for its first year. In this role, Mr. Kautter collaborated with private industry and the states to assess vulner- abilities in the food supply and promote potential mitigation strategies. He left FDA briefly in 2010 for the USDA’s Food Safety Inspection Ser- vice (FSIS), where he was a senior food defense analyst, in charge of numerous vulnerability assessments of FSIS-regulated foods, as well as a senior technical subject matter expert on intentional contamination of food products. He returned to CFSAN this year as CORE’s Manager on the Prevention side. Mr. Kautter holds a B.S. in biology from George Mason University, and an M.S. in food microbiology from the University of Maryland. Robert Kravinsky is a Defense policy analyst in the Office of the Secre- tary of Defense (OSD). Most recently he served as the Principal Director for Rule of Law and International Humanitarian Policy, providing strate-

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87 APPENDIX B gic direction on a broad array of national security issues including mass atrocity prevention, international criminal justice, rule of law doctrine, and promoting good governance through security cooperation. Prior to that position, he served as a Senior Advisor at a leading non-profit think tank, the Project on National Security Reform, formulating strategic di- rection for the project and advising on matters of national security policy. In that capacity, he led a study effort to evaluate the effectiveness of the National Counterterrorism Center’s interagency planning capability. Pri- or to that position, Mr. Kravinsky served as the Director of Strategic Planning for Homeland Defense in OSD, overseeing homeland defense equities in the Quadrennial Defense Review, the National Implementa- tion Plan for Counterterrorism, the National Response Framework, and other national strategies. Leslie Lenert, M.D., is Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Informat- ics at the University of Utah. After completing medical school at Univer- sity of California Los Angeles, Internal Medicine residency at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, and fellowship training in Clini- cal Pharmacology and Medical Informatics at Stanford University, Dr. Lenert was appointed Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine. In 1997, he moved to University of Cali- fornia San Diego, where he was promoted to Professor of Medicine, and was an Associate Director of the California Institute for Telecommunica- tions and Information Technology. In 2007, Dr. Lenert became the founding Director of the National Center for Public Health Informatics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). As the head of a 650-person Center with a $110M budget, he led CDC efforts to develop national electronic disease surveillance systems and to integrate public health information systems into the Nationwide Health Information Net- work. In September 2010, Dr. Lenert joined the Department of Medicine at the University of Utah, where he is working to integrate population health strategies to specialty and primary care practices. The author of more than 120 publications, Dr. Lenert is currently involved in research on the informatics solutions for population health care, wireless electron- ic health records systems for first responders, and patient empowerment through computers in clinical relationships. Dr. Lenert is Fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics; a past member of the Board of Directors of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA); a member of the editorial boards of JAMIA, the Journal of Biomedical Informatics, and the International Journal of Medical Informatics; and

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88 BIOSURVEILLANCE INFORMATION SHARING AND COLLABORATION has served on study sections for Agency for Health Research and Quality and the National Library of Medicine. He has won awards for his re- search work from the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association, the American Federation for Clinical Research, and AMIA. Jean-Marie Maillard, M.D., M.Sc., joined the North Carolina Depart- ment of Health and Human Sciences’ (NC DHHS’s) Division of Public Health in 1992. He served as medical epidemiologist for disease control and surveillance in the Communicable Disease Branch from 1992 to 2002, then was in charge of epidemiology and surveillance capacity building from 2002 to 2008, and became director of the Medical Consul- tation Unit of the Communicable Disease Branch in 2008. Prior to join- ing the NC DHHS, he was external consultant for the World Bank in four consultations in Madagascar in 1990-1991; Regional Medical Officer in Botswana for 4 years (1986-1989), and District Medical Officer in Saint Lucia for 18 months (1983-1984). Both of these assignments were under bilateral government agreements. Dr. Maillard received his M.D. in Par- is, France, in 1983, his M.Sc. in epidemiology from the London, UK, School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in 1992, and his North Caroli- na M.D. license in 1999. He is board certified in public health and pre- ventive medicine since 2004. Peter Purcell, M.B.A., has responsibility for Technology for the Board of Governors’ Division of Banking Supervision and Regulation. Over his 35-year career, Mr. Purcell has held executive positions in technology and retail banking. He started his career at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, where he held successive technology positions of increasing re- sponsibility. Teresa Quitugua, Ph.D., currently serves as the Acting Director for the National Biosurveillance Integration Center (NBIC) within the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS’s) Office of Health Affairs. She leads a multidisciplinary team in coordination of interagency biosurveillance in- formation sharing across the National Biosurveillance Integration System (NBIS) interagency community in accordance with Presidential Directives and Public Law. Dr. Quitugua previously worked as the Director of the Molecular Mycobacteriology Laboratory for the Texas Department of Health and as an assistant professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA). In these positions, she coordinated public health

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89 APPENDIX B and research interactions with private and public health care providers and laboratories at city, regional, state, national, and international levels for clinical and molecular epidemiologic investigations of tuberculosis. She also directed the development of tuberculosis (TB) and Valley Fever vaccine, pathogenesis, and immunology studies; molecular TB drug sus- ceptibility testing methods; and new TB genotyping methods. Dr. Quitugua also served as a member of the Infection and Immunity editori- al board and as chair of the UTHSCSA Institutional Biosafety Commit- tee. Dr. Teresa Quitugua earned her B.S. in microbiology from the University of Illinois in 1990 and her Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio in 1996. Stephen C. Redd, M.D., Rear Admiral and Assistant Surgeon General, U.S. Public Health Service, is Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Influenza Coordination Unit. The unit was formed in 2006 to provide a central focus for pandemic influenza prepa- rations at CDC. Dr. Redd was responsible for developing plans for pan- demic response, exercising those plans, tracking progress in developing specific capabilities needed for an influenza pandemic, and communi- cating progress in these capabilities. In April 2009, shortly after the H1N1 virus was identified, Dr. Redd was appointed Incident Command- er of CDC’s H1N1 pandemic influenza response, providing daily direc- tion to all of CDC’s pandemic response efforts from detecting the virus through the H1N1 vaccination program. More than 3,300 CDC staff par- ticipated in the response during the 11-month activation of CDC Emer- gency Operations Center. Dr. Redd joined CDC in 1985 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer, following clinical training. He has published widely in the control of respiratory diseases, malaria control, measles epidemiology and elimination, environmental health, and asthma. Dr. Redd has received numerous awards including the Public Health Service Distinguished Service Medal for leading CDC’s pandemic response and the Charles Shepard Award, an annual award for the outstanding manu- script published by CDC authors. Dr. Redd received his undergraduate degree from Princeton University and his medical degree from Emory University. He trained in internal medicine at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and practices internal medicine at Grady Memorial Hospital and the Cherokee Indian Hospital. Kevin Russell, M.D., graduated from University of Texas Health Sci- ence Center San Antonio Medical School in 1990; after a family practice

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90 BIOSURVEILLANCE INFORMATION SHARING AND COLLABORATION internship he was accepted into the Navy Undersea Medicine program. He was stationed in Panama City, Florida, at the Experimental Diving Unit where he worked in diving medicine research from 1991 to 1995. After a preventive medicine residency with a master’s degree in tropical medicine and hygiene, CAPT Russell was transferred to Lima, Peru, where he became head of the Virology Laboratory. His portfolio includ- ed febrile illness (largely arboviral in origin) and HIV surveillance stud- ies in eight different countries of South America, as well as prospective dengue transmission studies. In 2001 he moved back to the United States and became the Director of the Respiratory Disease Laboratory at the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego, California. Febrile respira- tory illness surveillance in recruits of all services was expanded into shipboard populations, Mexican border populations, support for out- breaks, and deployed settings. Validation and integration of new and emerging advanced diagnostic capabilities, using the archives of speci- mens maintained at the laboratory, became a priority. Projects expanded in 2006 to clinical trials support as CAPT Russell became the Principal Investigator for the Navy site in the FDA Phase 3 adenovirus vaccines trial, and more recently to support the Phase 4 post-marketing trial of the recently Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved ACAM2000 Smallpox vaccine. In July of 2008, CAPT Russell assumed the responsi- bilities of Director, Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DOD-GEIS), and Deputy Director, Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center (AFHSC). He is tasked with the responsibility of melding the GEIS network into the attributes of the AFHSC; his priorities have been standardization, greater affiliations with world militaries, and continuing to introduce scientific rigor into the network. CAPT Russell assumed the duties of Director, Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center in June 2011. His priorities have expanded to explore ways to provide an even more comprehensive product for the military community that the AFHSC serves. Merrie Spaeth, M.S. (standing committee), is President of Spaeth Communications, Inc. Her background is in media, government, politics, business, and the entertainment industry. She is a pioneer in communica- tion theory and executive training, and acknowledged as one of the preeminent crisis management strategists in the country. She founded Dallas-based Spaeth Communications, Inc., in 1987. The firm provides communication training and consulting for a wide range of companies and institutions. She is also the founder and president of the Institute for

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91 APPENDIX B Strategic Communications, a not-for-profit foundation devoted to study- ing and reporting on business communication issues. In the early 1980s, Ms. Spaeth served as a White House Fellow and worked for FBI Director William Webster. She served 2 years at the Federal Trade Commission as Director of Public Affairs, and in 1984 she served as Director of Me- dia Relations at the White House. During her tenure, she introduced sat- ellite communications to the White House and launched the electronic White House News Service. Ms. Spaeth has worked in every area of print and electronic media. She’s been a radio and television talk show host, a producer for ABC’s 20/20, and a reporter for many magazines and papers. Her honors include Glamour’s 10 Outstanding Working Women of America and the National Council of Women’s Citation of Accomplishment. A cum laude graduate of Smith College, she holds a master’s degree from Columbia Business School and was awarded the school’s Overall Achievement Award. William F. Stephens, M.S., has managed the advanced practice center at Tarrant County Public Health for over 7 years in the area of public health preparedness, informatics, and development of preparedness capacity and capabilities. His areas of focus have been in biosurveillance system development and evaluation, and radiological/nuclear disaster prepared- ness including psychosocial/behavioral and risk communication. He has also served as a technical advisor for pilot testing and implementation of an electronic medical records system now in final implementation in several clinics at Tarrant County Public Health. Under his leadership, the Tarrant County center has made significant contributions in biosurveillance systems development, health information exchange for outbreak detection and situational awareness, and in building health care disaster response core competencies for all hazards. Mr. Stephens has served on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) national biosurveillance advisory subcommittee, as an advisor on medical preparedness for a nuclear detonation workshop and report sponsored by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Institute of Medicine (IOM), and was a member of the CDC/Coordinating Office for Terrorism Preparedness and Emergency Response (COTPER) Board of Scientific Counselors from 2007 to 2010. Prior to joining Tarrant County Public Health Mr. Stephens worked in senior management roles in the scientific/biomedical imaging industry and in several strategic defense systems programs. He contributed to product development for the first commercially available digital mam-

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92 BIOSURVEILLANCE INFORMATION SHARING AND COLLABORATION mography systems, and for image sensors used in mapping the human ge- nome. He holds an M.S. from Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas. Regina Tan, D.V.M., has more than 10 years of public health experience in preventive medicine and epidemiology, and joined the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) from the MITRE Corporation, where her management of a team of engineers was essential to developing innova- tive data architecture research and development across the federal government. Dr. Tan began her career as a Commissioned Corps officer in the U.S. Public Health Service and worked with the Centers for Dis- ease Control and Prevention (CDC), first as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer then as a Preventive Medicine Fellow. She joined FSIS’s then–Human Health Sciences Division (now the Applied Epidemiology Division) as a veterinary epidemiologist in 2003, where she managed the Consumer Complaint Monitoring System team and hurricane response components. In 2005, Dr. Tan rejoined CDC, as a liaison with the Armed Forces Medical Intelligence Center. Dr. Tan has led or served on numer- ous public health advisory committees, interagency teams and working groups pertaining to threats to public health. Dr. Tan earned her D.V.M. and M.S. from Purdue University and her bachelor of science in biology from the University of Maryland. She is also a Diplomate of the Ameri- can College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine.