Appendix A


Workshop Agenda

U.S. AND INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON
GLOBAL SCIENCE POLICY AND SCIENCE DIPLOMACY

February 25–26, 2011
Palomar Hotel
Washington, DC

February 25

8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

8:30 a.m.

Welcome

Ralph J. Cicerone, President, National Academy of Sciences

Philip Coyle, Associate Director for National Security and International Affairs, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

8:50 a.m.

Statement of Meeting Goals

Michael T. Clegg, Foreign Secretary, National Academy of Sciences, and Committee Chair

U.S. Policy for Global Science

The practice of science is increasingly globalized. At the same time, global problems often require science and engineering resources and solutions that one nation alone cannot provide. Thus, global policy for



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Appendix A Workshop Agenda U.S. AND INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON GLOBAL SCIENCE POLICY AND SCIENCE DIPLOMACY February 25–26, 2011 Palomar Hotel Washington, DC February 25 8:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast 8:30 a.m. Welcome Ralph J. Cicerone, President, National Academy of Sciences Philip Coyle, Associate Director for National Security and International Affairs, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy 8:50 a.m. Statement of Meeting Goals Michael T. Clegg, Foreign Secretary, National Academy of Sciences, and Committee Chair U.S. Policy for Global Science The practice of science is increasingly globalized. At the same time, global problems often require science and engineering resources and solutions that one nation alone cannot provide. Thus, global policy for 41

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42 APPENDIX A science requires new approaches and allocation of resources to meet these changing needs. This session will look at ways to advance global science overall, to make U.S. science investments more effective in a globalized world, and to respond to important societal needs. 9:00 a.m. Introduction by C. D. (Dan) Mote Jr. 9:15 a.m. Session I: Patterns of Mobility and Changing Patterns of Movements of Global Talents What mobility and special skills do U.S. scientists need in today’s globalized world? What challenging and beneficial implications does the reverse brain drain in countries like India and China have for the United States? How can the United States help developing countries deal with the effect of brain drain? What special initiatives that foster new link- ages and collaborations and engage young and promising scientists and engineers (including in developing countries) should be pursued? Moderator: Charles M. Vest Discussion Leaders: Rita Colwell, Khotso Mokhele Short Break 10:30 a.m. Session II: Maximizing Scientific Advances in the Context of an Increasingly Global Research Community How can bilateral and multilateral scientific collaborations be enhanced by removing barriers and by finding ways for federal programs to be more flexible and innovative? Could resource allocation be more efficient? Are there important gaps? Moderator: C. D. (Dan) Mote Jr. Discussion Leader: Celia Merzbacher 12:00 p.m. Lunch

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43 APPENDIX A 1:00 p.m. Session III: Promising Areas for High Impact Collabora- tion and Activities What scientific areas or cooperation modes for highly effec- tive collaboration and activities will be most likely to gen- erate promising results? What role can small-scale scien- tific collaboration projects play? What is best done within the private sector, the public sector, and in public–private partnerships? Moderator: Cherry Murray Discussion Leaders: Karen Strier, Tom Casadevall Short Break 2:30 p.m. Session IV: Effective Global Science What are examples of effective global science policy? How can effective global science policy be measured? Moderator: Judith Kimble Discussion Leaders: Hernan Chaimovich, Larry Weber 4:00 p.m. Reflection on the Day’s Discussion Moderator: Michael T. Clegg 5:30 p.m. Working Dinner February 26 8:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast Science for Diplomacy—Diplomacy for Science While scientists have acted as representatives of their own countries and thus used, consciously or unconsciously, diplomatic approaches in their scientific engagement with international partners for a long time, the term science diplomacy has gained increasing use in recent years. This session will look at barriers to and better application of interna - tional science diplomacy.

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44 APPENDIX A 8:20 a.m. Introduction by Norman Neureiter 8:30 a.m. Session I: Framing the Issue: The Role and Definition of Science Diplomacy The term science diplomacy has been used widely in recent years, not always with the same understanding of its defini- tion. This session will set the basis for how this term is being used in this workshop. Moderator: Norman Neureiter Discussion Leaders: Lama Youssef, Doron Weber 9:30 a.m. Session II: What Has Been Done with Science Diplomacy? In which cases has science contributed successfully to dip- lomatic goals and vice versa? When has it failed and why? Moderator: John Boright Discussion Leaders: Shafiqul Islam, Munir Alam, David Hamburg Short Break 11:00 a.m. Session III: Barriers to Progress in International Science Diplomacy Science and diplomacy meet and are being applied to a com- plex environment of different interests. What are the main impediments to progress in international science diplomacy? Moderator: Michael T. Clegg Discussion Leaders: Gebisa Ejeta, Volker ter Meulen 12:30 p.m. Lunch 1:30 p.m. Session IV: Better Application of Science Diplomacy How can the United States and its partners make better use of science diplomacy? How can international science diplo- macy methods be improved, including special initiatives and engagement of young scientists that help foster new

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45 APPENDIX A linkages and collaborations? What lessons can the United States learn from successful examples of science diplomacy? Moderator: Vaughan Turekian Discussion Leaders: Abdul Hamid Zakri, Marvadeen Singh- Wilmot, Azamat Abdymomunov 3:00 p.m. Going Forward: Summary of the Workshop Discussion Based on the discussions and the attendee’s reflections, this session will respond to the workshop goals and summarize promising examples of successful approaches and sugges- tions for science diplomacy and offer more flexible and innovative ways for federal agencies to enhance interna- tional scientific collaboration and respond to changing pat- terns in global scientific movement. Moderator: Cutberto Garza

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