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APPENDIX B

Biographies of Speakers
 (Biographies provided were those at the time of the workshop.)

Alice R. de P. Abreu is professor emeritus of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil and the regional coordinator of the International Council for Science (ICSU) Rio+20 Initiative. She is the former director of the Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean of ICSU ending her mandate in December 2010. She received her doctoral degree in sociology from the University of São Paulo Brazil (1980), and her M.S. in sociology from the London School of Economics and Political Science of the University of London (1971). A full professor of sociology from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro until 2005, Abreu has published extensively on the sociology of work and gender. She also held a number of important positions within the academic community of Brazil and internationally, which included the vice presidency of the National Research Council for Scientific and Technological Development in the Ministry of Science and Technology of Brazil, and director of the Office of Education, Science and Technology of the Organization of American States, in Washington D.C. Abreu served on the Executive Committee of International Sociological Association for two terms, 2002-2006 and 2006-2010. She received the Ordem Nacional do Mérito Científico (Comendador) of the Science and Technology Ministry, Brazil in 2001; the Palmes Académiques (Officier) of the Ministère de la Jeunesse, de l’Éducation Nationale et de la Recherche, République Française, in 2003. She was awarded the Florestan Fernandes Prize in 2009. Abreu is, since 2010, a foreign member of the Academia de Ciencias Médicas, Físicas y Naturales de Guatemala.

Kathie Bailey-Mathae, director of the Board on International Scientific Organizations (BISO), began her career at the National Academies in February 2005 when she joined BISO as a program officer. After serving as senior program officer and BISO’s deputy director, she was appointed director in May 2007. Her responsibilities in BISO have included six U.S. national committees in math and physical sciences, National Academy of Sciences (NAS) representation on the U.S. National Commission for United Nations Educational, Scientific, Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and visa policy. Prior to coming to the National Academies, Bailey-Mathae worked for the Association of American Universities for 14 years. Prior to that, she worked for Congresswoman Lindy Boggs (D-LA) as associate staff for Department of Housing and Urban Development appropriations and special projects assistant. She has a B.A. from Milligan College and a J.D. from Tulane University.

Daryl Chubin became founding director of the Center for Advancing Science and Engineering Capacity at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in August 2004. Prior to that he served more than 3 years as senior vice president Research, Policy and Programs at the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, Inc. after nearly 15 years in federal service. Posts included 3 years (1998-2001) as senior policy officer for the



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APPENDIX B Biographies of Speakers (Biographies provided were those at the time of the workshop.) Alice R. de P. Abreu is professor emeritus of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil and the regional coordinator of the International Council for Science (ICSU) Rio+20 Initiative. She is the former director of the Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean of ICSU ending her mandate in December 2010. She received her doctoral degree in sociology from the University of So Paulo Brazil (1980), and her M.S. in sociology from the London School of Economics and Political Science of the University of London (1971). A full professor of sociology from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro until 2005, Abreu has published extensively on the sociology of work and gender. She also held a number of important positions within the academic community of Brazil and internationally, which included the vice presidency of the National Research Council for Scientific and Technological Development in the Ministry of Science and Technology of Brazil, and director of the Office of Education, Science and Technology of the Organization of American States, in Washington D.C. Abreu served on the Executive Committee of International Sociological Association for two terms, 2002-2006 and 2006-2010. She received the Ordem Nacional do Mrito Cientfico (Comendador) of the Science and Technology Ministry, Brazil in 2001; the Palmes Acadmiques (Officier) of the Ministre de la Jeunesse, de l'ducation Nationale et de la Recherche, Rpublique Franaise, in 2003. She was awarded the Florestan Fernandes Prize in 2009. Abreu is, since 2010, a foreign member of the Academia de Ciencias Mdicas, Fsicas y Naturales de Guatemala. Kathie Bailey-Mathae, director of the Board on International Scientific Organizations (BISO), began her career at the National Academies in February 2005 when she joined BISO as a program officer. After serving as senior program officer and BISO's deputy director, she was appointed director in May 2007. Her responsibilities in BISO have included six U.S. national committees in math and physical sciences, National Academy of Sciences (NAS) representation on the U.S. National Commission for United Nations Educational, Scientific, Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and visa policy. Prior to coming to the National Academies, Bailey- Mathae worked for the Association of American Universities for 14 years. Prior to that, she worked for Congresswoman Lindy Boggs (D-LA) as associate staff for Department of Housing and Urban Development appropriations and special projects assistant. She has a B.A. from Milligan College and a J.D. from Tulane University. Daryl Chubin became founding director of the Center for Advancing Science and Engineering Capacity at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in August 2004. Prior to that he served more than 3 years as senior vice president Research, Policy and Programs at the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, Inc. after nearly 15 years in federal service. Posts included 3 years (1998-2001) as senior policy officer for the 47

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48 BLUEPRINT FOR THE FUTURE National Science Board of the National Science Foundation (NSF); division director for Research, Evaluation and Communication in NSF's Directorate for Education and Human Resources (1993-1998); and (on detail) assistant director for Social and Behavioral Sciences (and Education) at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (1997). He began his federal career in 1986 at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment. Chubin has also served on the faculty of four universities, including Georgia Institute of Technology, where he was promoted to full professor. Since 1991, he has been an adjunct professor at the Cornell in Washington Program. He has published eight books and numerous policy reports, articles, and commentaries on issues in science policy, human resource development, program evaluation, and engineering education. Among his honors are the following: AAAS fellow, past chair of the AAAS Section on Societal Impacts of Science and Engineering, fellow of the Association for Women in Science, co-recipient of the American Society of Engineering Education Wickenden Award for best paper published in the 2003 volume of the Journal of Engineering Education, Quality Education for Minorities/Mathematics, Science, and Engineering 2006 Giant of Science, and Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecturer 2007-2009. Today, he participates on the board of directors of three not-for-profit organizations and on the editorial board of three professional journals. Chubin has a B.A. in sociology from Miami University and a Ph.D. in sociology from Loyola University of Chicago. Joanne Cohoon is an associate professor at the Department of Science, Technology, and Society at the University of Virginia. She teaches gender, technology, and education and supervises both graduate and undergraduate student research. Cohoon is a sociologist who researches, publishes, and speaks on women's underrepresentation in Information Technology (IT) and on gender segregation in higher education. She has conducted nationwide studies of departmental factors that influence recruitment and retention at the undergraduate and graduate levels of computer science. Cohoon is a senior research scientist at the National Center for Women in IT Social Science Network; and a member of the Georgia Tech College of Computing Diversity Advisory Board, the PROACT Advisory Board, and the Working Committee on Women in Computing of Association for Computing Machinery Committee on Women in Computing. She has a B.A. in philosophy from Ramapo College, New Jersey, an M.A. in student personnel administration in higher education from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in sociology (dissertation, "Non-Parallel Processing: Gendered Attrition in Academic Computer Science") from the University of Virginia. Keith Crank is the research and graduate education manager at American Statistical Association (ASA). Prior to joining the ASA, he was a program officer at NSF, primarily in the probability program. Crank has a B.S. in mathematics education, an M.S. in mathematics from Michigan State University, and a Ph.D. in statistics from Purdue University. Ingrid Daubechies received both her B.S. and Ph.D. degrees (in 1975 and 1980) from the Free University in Brussels, Belgium. She held a research position at the Free University until 1987. From 1987 to 1994, she was a member of the technical staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories, during which time she took leaves to spend 6 months (in 1990) at the University of Michigan and 2 years (1991-1993) at Rutgers University. From 1993 to 2010, Daubechies was a full professor at Princeton University, where she was active especially within the Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics. She was the first female full professor of mathematics at Princeton. In January 2011, she moved to Duke University to serve as a professor of mathematics. Daubechies is the first woman president of the International Mathematical Union (2011-2014). Her research interests focus on the mathematical aspects of time-frequency

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APPENDIX B: BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS 49 analysis, in particular wavelets, as well as applications. The American Mathematical Society (AMS) awarded her a Leroy P. Steele prize for exposition in 1994 for her book Ten Lectures on Wavelets, as well as the 1997 Ruth Lyttle Satter Prize. From 1992 to 1997, she was a fellow of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. She is a member of NAS, AAAS, the AMS, the Mathematical Association of America, the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Jessie DeAro joined the U.S. Department of Education as a presidential management fellow in 1999 after receiving her doctorate in physical chemistry from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Within the Department of Education, she worked with minority- serving institutions to strengthen the quality of education programs and institutional infrastructure. In 2003, she joined NSF as a program director working with programs to diversify the STEM1 workforce, including the Historically Black Colleges and Universities- Undergraduate Program and ADVANCE Program. She recently spent a year detailed to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy where she worked on STEM education and workforce diversity policy. She is once again at NSF working on issues related to graduate education, postdoctoral training, and academic careers, and as program director for the Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate program. Catherine Didion is the director of the Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine (CWSEM) of the National Research Council (NRC). In addition, she is a senior program officer at the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). Her charge at NAE is to provide staff leadership to the Academies' efforts to enhance the diversity of the engineering workforce at all levels. As part of her responsibilities, she is currently the project director for the $2 million Engineering Equity Extension Service Project, which is working with engineering societies to enhance their gender equity principles within their programs. Before joining the National Academies, Didion was vice president of the Didion Group, a public affairs and communications firm, as well as a director of the International Network of Women in Engineering and Science. Didion previously served 14 years as the executive director of the Association for Women in Science (AWIS). During her tenure, AWIS was awarded the U.S. Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring, and she was the principle investigator for 17 U.S. government and foundation grants. Didion has presented testimony before the U.S. Congress and U.S. federal agencies. She has worked extensively with the European Commission, the South African Ministry of Science and Technology, the Organization of American States, and many other organizations on these issues. She has been an invited speaker on mentoring, networking, and women in science and engineering at over 200 conferences and has authored over 50 publications on women in science and engineering. She was the editor for the "Women in Science" column for the Journal of College Science Teaching from 1993 to 2002. Didion has extensive experience on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., including staff positions at the U.S. Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee, the U.S. Senate Computer Center, and the U.S. Senate Press Gallery. Allan Fisher is the vice president of Laureate Education, Inc. He previously was cofounder, president, and CEO of iCarnegie Inc., an online higher education subsidiary of Carnegie Mellon University; before that, he served until 1999 as faculty member and associate dean for undergraduate education in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. During that time, Fisher worked in high-performance computing and networking research and also led the creation of Carnegie Mellon's B.S. program in computer science. In 1 Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is a commonly used acronym in the United States.

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50 BLUEPRINT FOR THE FUTURE the late 1990s, he and Jane Margolis carried out a program of research and intervention that helped to increase the proportion of women entering the computer science program from 7 percent in 1995 to 42 percent in 2000. This work is described in their book Unlocking the Clubhouse: Women in Computing, published in 2002 by Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press. He received a B.S. in chemistry from Princeton University, studied at the University of Cambridge, and received a Ph.D. in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University. Fisher served on a number of advisory committees for projects and organizations working toward diversity in technology fields, including the Anita Borg Institute and CWSEM. Lisa M. Frehill is a senior program officer at the National Academies. In addition to her work at the National Academies, she is the director of research, evaluation, and policy at the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME). Since earning her doctoral degree, she has developed expertise in the science and engineering workforce with a focus on how gender and ethnicity impact access to careers and international participation and collaboration in these fields. As an associate professor of sociology at New Mexico State University, she was the principal investigator and program director of NSF-funded ADVANCE: Institutional Transformation Program, which sought to increase women's success in academic science and engineering careers. She has consulted with numerous colleges and universities on gender equity issues. Frehill has worked with the Society of Women Engineers on several projects, including a retention study and the annual review of literature on women in engineering. She was the lead author of the Motorola Foundation-funded study released by NACME in 2008 titled "Confronting the `New' American Dilemma: Underrepresented Minorities in Engineering: A Data-Based Look at Diversity," and the NACME databook. Research in progress includes projects funded by NSF on women's international participation and collaboration in science and engineering and on career outcomes of engineering bachelor's degree recipients. Wendy Hansen is a senior researcher at the United Nations University Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT). Hansen studied sociology at Carleton University in Canada and joined Statistics Canada's Postsecondary Education Projections/Analyses Section. In the fall of 1988, she moved to Industry Canada, where she has been a senior policy analyst in industry and science policy. Hansen joined MERIT as a senior research associate in May 1997 to continue her research. Her research focuses on knowledge workers, in particular scientists and engineers, and falls in a range of science and technology policy issues and information society. Her research addresses the change in the skill base of the labor force, including the development of new measures for links between knowledge workers and technological change, as well as specific measures of human capital in a digitized society. Cheryl B. Leggon is an associate professor at the School of Public Policy in the Georgia Institute of Technology. Leggon's research focuses on African American, Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Native American, and Native Pacific Islander women in science and engineering; this focus developed while she was a staff officer in the Office of Scientific and Engineering Personnel at the NRC. Her work underscores the criticality of disaggregating data by race, ethnicity, and gender to develop policy, programs and practices that enhance and expand the science and engineering talent pool in the United States. Currently, Leggon is co-principal investigator on two grants funded by NSF "Inside the Double Bind--A Synthesis of Literature on Women of Color in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics" and "Cross- Disciplinary Initiative for Minority Women Faculty" (ADVANCE Leadership). She earned a

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APPENDIX B: BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS 51 Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago and a B.A. in sociology from Barnard College, Columbia University. Robert Lichter, a principal at Merrimack Consultants, LLC, received his A.B. cum laude from Harvard College in 1962 and his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1967, both in chemistry. He was a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral fellow at the Technische Universitt Braunschweig, Germany, from 1967 to 1968, and a research fellow at the California Institute of Technology from 1968 to 1970. After 13 years in the chemistry department at Hunter College of the City University of New York, including 4 years as department chair, he became regional director of grants at Research Corporation from 1983 to 1986. From 1986 to 1989, Lichter served as vice provost for research and graduate studies at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Before embarking on his current position in 2002, he was executive director of the New York City-based Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation from 1989 to 2002, where he directed the strategies and administration of 10 programs and related activities that yielded about $6 million in grants and awards in the chemical and closely related sciences for research, education, science communication, and human resource development. Among his professional activities, Lichter was chair of the AAAS Section on Chemistry for 2001-2002, and was secretary of the section from 2004 to 2009. At the American Chemical Society (ACS), he has been a member of the Committee on Science and its Committee on Minority Affairs, and the latter's subcommittee on the ACS Scholars Program. Lichter has served on and has chaired numerous national panels and advisory boards dealing with broad educational and scientific issues, including many for ACS, NSF, and the NRC. Anne MacLachlan is a senior researcher at the Center for Studies in Higher Education at the University of California, Berkeley (UCB), and affiliated with the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology as an evaluator of its NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. She is also the evaluator of a STEM program for underrepresented students at City College of San Francisco. Her research areas for the past 20 years include the issues of access and success of women and minorities in science in postsecondary education from first-year community college students through faculty and leadership positions with a special focus on graduate students. A significant part of this research is on discrimination and bias. She also organizes and gives professional development programs for REU students by drawing on 20 years of experience creating and giving employment and professional development programs for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and undergraduates. She is finishing a book on minority success in STEM Ph.D. programs and is developing an institutional evaluation of STEM education in the California community colleges. Her work has been supported by NSF, the Spencer Foundation, and the Max Planck Institute, among others. An example of her service on campus is the Coalition for Excellency and Diversity at UCB, Science Seminar for Underrepresented Minority Graduate Students; as an example of state service, she served with the California Post Secondary Education Commission Gender Gap Project; and for national service, she served as a reviewer for the National Institutes of Health, Sloan Foundation, NSF, AAAS Center for Advancing Science and Engineering Capacity, and Planning Committee for the 3rd Understanding Interventions Conference. A recent talk at UCB was titled "Federal Support for Science in the Research University: The Social Consequences between 1947 and the Present." Shirley Malcom is head of the Directorate for Education and Human Resources Programs of AAAS. The directorate includes AAAS programs in education, activities for underrepresented groups, and public understanding of science and technology. Malcom serves

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52 BLUEPRINT FOR THE FUTURE on several boards, including the Heinz Endowments and the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment, and is an honorary trustee of the American Museum of Natural History. In 2006, she was named co-chair (with Leon Lederman) of the National Science Board's Commission on 21st Century Education in STEM. She serves as a regent of Morgan State University and as a trustee of Caltech. In addition, she has chaired a number of national committees addressing education reform and access to scientific and technical education, careers, and literacy. Malcom is a former trustee of the Carnegie Corporation of New York. She is a fellow of the AAAS and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She served on the National Science Board, the policy-making body of NSF from 1994 to 1998; from 1994 to 2001, she served on the President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology. Malcom received her doctorate in ecology from Pennsylvania State University; master's degree in zoology from the University of California, Los Angeles; and bachelor's degree with distinction in zoology from the University of Washington. She also holds 15 honorary degrees. In 2003, she received the Public Welfare Medal of NAS, the highest award given by the Academy. Malcom is a member of NAS. Connie L. McNeely received a Ph.D. in sociology from Stanford University. She is currently professor of public policy and co-director of the Center for Science and Technology Policy at George Mason University. Her teaching and research address various aspects of politics, organizational behavior, science and technology, governance, social theory, and culture. Emphasizing comparative and historical perspectives, her work has engaged questions on international development and organization and on issues related to race, ethnicity, nation, and gender. She also has conducted research on education, science and technology, and health care, and has ongoing projects examining cultural and institutional dynamics and matters of citizenship and polity participation. McNeely is currently working as part of a larger initiative on democratizing education in the United States and elsewhere and is principal investigator on a major research project examining institutional outcomes and policy impacts on women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics in higher education. She is also active in several professional associations, serves as a reviewer and evaluator in a variety of programs and venues, and sits on several advisory boards and committees. Bradley Miller, director of the ACS Office of International Activities, has worked for ACS since 1999 developing programs, products, and services to advance chemical sciences through collaborations in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East. At ACS, the world's largest single disciplinary scientific society, he works to create opportunities for chemistry to address global challenges through in-person and Web-based scientific network development and research and educational exchange. In 2006, Miller was recipient of a NSF Discovery Corps Fellowship to catalyze and sustain U.S. and Brazil collaboration in chemistry of biomass conversions to biofuels. He has worked for university-based international programs, for a higher education association focused on principles of quality assurance for transnational educational offerings, and for a private voluntary organization dedicated to international allied health sciences. With a Ph.D. from the University of Arizona (and research interests and experience in scientific, professional, and academic mobility), a master's degree from the University of Northern Colorado, and a baccalaureate degree from the University of Virginia Wise, Miller speaks French, Spanish, and Portuguese and has published nine articles and book chapters. Mariko Ogawa is the executive advisor to the president, director of the Support Office for Women Researchers, and professor of history of science and science studies, Mie University,

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APPENDIX B: BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS 53 Japan. Ogawa's teaching and research interests are in the history of biology and medicine in 19th century England and Germany, and in gender in science. She is the author of Uneasy Bedfellows, Bulletin on History of Medicine (2000), The Mysterious Mr. Collins, Journal of History of Biology (2001), Robert Koch's 74 Days in Japan (2003), Liebig and the Royal Agricultural Society Meeting at Bristol, 1842 (2008), Feminism and Technology/Science (2001, in Japanese), and Darwin Redux: Narrative in Evolutionary Theory (2003, in Japanese). Recently, she has been engaged in several co-authored works and has translated many books into Japanese, especially those relating to gender in science. With her translations, four excellent books by Professor Londa Schiebinger, former director of the Clayman Institute, Stanford University, are now available in Japanese. Willie Pearson, Jr., is professor of sociology, School of History, Technology, and Society, Georgia Institute of Technology. In 1993, he received Southern Illinois University's College of Liberal Arts Alumni Achievement Award. He specializes in the sociology of science and sociology of the family. He is the author or coeditor of six books and monographs and numerous articles and chapters. His most recent book is titled Beyond Small Numbers: Voices of African American Ph.D. Chemists (2005). Pearson has held research grants from NSF, National Endowment for the Humanities, Sloan Foundation, and U.S. Department of Justice. He has held postdoctoral fellowships at the Educational Testing Service and the Office of Technology Assessment, U.S. Congress. He is a fellow of AAAS, and has served as a lecturer in Sigma Xi's Distinguished Lectureship Program. He has served as chair of the Committee on Equal Opportunities in Science and Engineering, NSF, and as chair of the Committee for Science, Engineering and Public Policy, AAAS. In 2001, he was designated a lifetime national associate of the National Academies. Currently, he serves on advisory committees in the Education and Human Resources Directorate (NSF), the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, and NAS. His Ph.D. is from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale (1981). Angelica Salvi Del Pero is a policy analyst at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), where she is the administrator of the OECD Gender Initiative, which aims at identifying the main barriers to gender equality in education, employment, and entrepreneurship in OECD countries and other regions and assessing the experience with policies to address these barriers. Before joining the OECD in July 2010, Salvi Del Pero was a research fellow at Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, an Italian think tank, and a consultant for the World Bank. She also held a postdoctoral position at the University of Pavia. She has worked extensively on poverty and income distribution in developing countries, as well as on firm performance and investment climate issues. Salvi Del Pero has taught various economics courses at the University of Milan. Salvi Del Pero holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Milan, an M.S. in economics from the University of WisconsinMadison, and a B.A. in business and economics from the University of Turin. Johanna (Anneke) M.H. Levelt Sengers is a native of The Netherlands where she obtained her Ph.D. in physics in 1958. She immigrated to the United States in 1963 and made her career at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Her expertise is in the area of thermodynamics and critical phenomena in fluids, with application to industrial fluids. In particular, she worked in an international context on standards for the properties of water and steam on behalf of the electric power industry. She is the 2003 L'Oreal-UNESCO for Women in Science Laureate for North America. Within the framework of InterAcademies Panel (IAP), the Global Network of Academies of Sciences, she was the coauthor of the InterAcademy Council Advisory Report Women for Science, which was adopted by IAP in 2006. She is currently the

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54 BLUEPRINT FOR THE FUTURE chair of the Women for Science Working Group of the InterAmerican Network of Academies of Sciences (IANAS). She is a member of NAS and NAE. Carol F. Stoel is a program director in Division of Graduate Education, Education and Human Resources Directorate at NSF. Her program responsibilities at NSF include Ethics Education in Science and Engineering, Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship Program, and Science Master's Program. Patricia Taboada-Serrano is the early-career representative in the Women for Science Working Group of the IANAS. She received her Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology in 2005. She was a postdoctoral research associate at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 2006 to 2008. From 2008 to 2010, she served as an adjunct professor in Bolivian Catholic University.