TABLE 8-1 Estimated Number of Currently Employed Nuclear and Radiochemists by Sector and Degree

Sector B.S. M.S. Ph.D.
Medicine* 89 43 163
Energy 160 49 46
National laboratories (security and EM) 167 164 494
Academia (chemistry faculty only)** n.a. n.a. 62
Total 416 256 765

EM, environmental management; n.a., not applicable.

*Includes industry, National Institutes of Health, and nuclear medicine faculty members.

Includes nuclear and radiochemistry expertise at nuclear power plants, nuclear vendors and support industry, and federal and state regulatory agencies.

**Does not include all staff involved in maintaining nuclear facilities, such as those enforcing safety.

SOURCE: Based on personal communication from industry, national laboratories, and state agencies, and the current number of academic faculty (Figure 3-4).

TABLE 8-2 Estimated Number of Nuclear and Radiochemists to be Hired in the Next 5 Years, by Sector and Degree, to Meet Status Quo Demands

B.S. M.S. Ph.D.
Medicine* 26 20 46
Energy 104 14 11
National laboratories (security and EM) 70 59 228
Academia (chemistry faculty only)** n.a. n.a. 21
Total 200 93 306

EM, environmental management; n.a., not applicable.

*Includes only industry.

Includes nuclear and radiochemistry expertise at nuclear power plants, nuclear vendors and support industry, and federal and state regulatory agencies.

**Based on number of new faculty since 2009, shown in Figure 3-4.

SOURCE: Based on personal communication from industry, national laboratories, and state agencies, and from recent hires of academic faculty (Figure 3-4).

50 B.S. and 10 M.S. will likely have taken an advanced course in nuclear and radiochemistry. Thus, the projected supply of B.S.-level nuclear and radiochemists over five years is 250 and M.S.-level is 50. Both of these groups would also supply those who enter Ph.D. programs.

Although, as explained in Chapter 1, advanced degrees in nuclear and radiochemistry are no longer tracked by government surveys, the committee was able to identify recent Ph.D.s granted in nuclear and radiochemistry by looking at published theses with nuclear chemistry as a subject keyword: an average of 13 Ph.D. theses per year were published in 2004-2010 (Figure 2-1). If this trend continues and if most of these Ph.D.s remain in the United



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