A

Study Statement of Task

 

An ad hoc committee will examine supply and demand for nuclear chemistry expertise in the United States compared with the production of experts with these skills, and discuss possible approaches for ensuring adequate availability of these skills, including necessary science and technology training platforms. It will:

•  Estimate the availability and need for experts with nuclear chemistry skills. Include:

image  The current and anticipated availability in 20 years of U.S. experts (both type and number) with nuclear, radio-, and radiation chemistry skills based on current education and training capabilities.

image  The type and number of experts needed in the next 20 years. Include skills necessary to support areas including education, basic science, weapons, non-proliferation, nuclear forensic, medical, and energy sector needs. Estimate the number of these experts who must be U.S. citizens.

•  Estimate the gap between availability and need, and discuss the impact of this gap on the relevant sectors.

•  Suggest approaches that could be implemented to assure the U.S. supply of experts is adequate for the next 20 years. In particular, discuss models for science and technology training that could provide the necessary cadre of researchers with the appropriate skill set. In doing so the study will:

image  Describe the current availability of U.S. training programs, and assess the capabilities of these programs.

image  Compare current U.S. programs with science and technology training programs in other countries.



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OCR for page 163
A Study Statement of Task An ad hoc committee will examine supply and demand for nuclear chemistry expertise in the United States compared with the production of experts with these skills, and discuss possible approaches for ensuring ad- equate availability of these skills, including necessary science and technol- ogy training platforms. It will: • Estimate the availability and need for experts with nuclear chemistry skills. Include: The current and anticipated availability in 20 years of U.S. experts (both type and number) with nuclear, radio-, and radia- tion chemistry skills based on current education and training capabilities. The type and number of experts needed in the next 20 years. Include skills necessary to support areas including education, basic science, weapons, non-proliferation, nuclear forensic, medical, and energy sector needs. Estimate the number of these experts who must be U.S. citizens. • Estimate the gap between availability and need, and discuss the impact of this gap on the relevant sectors. • Suggest approaches that could be implemented to assure the U.S. supply of experts is adequate for the next 20 years. In particular, discuss models for science and technology training that could pro- vide the necessary cadre of researchers with the appropriate skill set. In doing so the study will: Describe the current availability of U.S. training programs, and assess the capabilities of these programs. Compare current U.S. programs with science and technology training programs in other countries. 163

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164 ASSURING A FUTURE U.S.-BASED NUCLEAR AND RADIOCHEMISTRY EXPERTISE Provide practical input to current programs and suggest new programs if necessary to meet the anticipated need. In particu- lar, suggest models beyond the traditional apprenticeship model between university professor and graduate student • Provide others suggestions as applicable for addressing causes of the decline in capability and re-establishing the health and vitality of nuclear, radio-, and radiation chemistry within the United States.