F

Data Collection from National Laboratories

 

The following individuals at contractor-operated national laboratories provided the committee with information on the dates indicated about numbers of their employees with nuclear and radiochemistry related skills: Emilio Bunel, Argonne National Laboratory (July 28, 2011); Leonard Mausner, Brookhaven National Laboratory (May 9, 2012); Carol Burns, Los Alamos National Laboratory (May 9, 2011); Cynthia Coolahan, Bradley Moore, and Steve Leone, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (August 26, 2011); Trish Baisden, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (May 17, 2011); Patricia Paviet-Hartmann, Idaho National Laboratory (June 27, 2011), Michelle Buchanan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (December 6 and 8, 2011); John Wacker; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (June 28, 2011); and Jeffrey Griffin, Savannah River National Laboratory (June 10, 2011).

The national laboratories listed above were provided with a list of relevant disciplines to assist them in providing appropriate demographic data. The disciplines included radiation biology, nuclear forensics, nuclear and radiochemistry, radiation chemistry, separations chemistry, environmental radiochemistry, and actinide and isotope geochemistry, as well as topics associated more with the application of these disciplines, such as actinide chemistry and processing, chemistry of special nuclear materials, nuclear fuel cycle expertise, or dose assessment. Each laboratory provided an analysis of workforce numbers and demographics by age band cohort and level of degree, provided that the committee present the national laboratory data in this report as a compilation. The estimated current numbers of national laboratory career employees with nuclear and radiochemistry skills, according to age cohort and degree, are shown in Figure 2-6. Projected demands for nuclear and radiochemistry related skills at national laboratories based on anticipated terminations, one year and 2-5 years from now, are shown in Table 2-5.



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F Data Collection from National Laboratories The following individuals at contractor-operated national laboratories provided the committee with information on the dates indicated about numbers of their employees with nuclear and radiochemistry related skills: Emilio Bunel, Argonne National Laboratory (July 28, 2011); Leonard Mausner, Brookhaven National Laboratory (May 9, 2012); Carol Burns, Los Alamos National Laboratory (May 9, 2011); Cynthia Coolahan, Bradley Moore, and Steve Leone, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (August 26, 2011); Trish Baisden, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (May 17, 2011); Patricia Paviet-Hartmann, Idaho National Laboratory (June 27, 2011), Michelle Buchanan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (December 6 and 8, 2011); John Wacker; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (June 28, 2011); and Jeffrey Griffin, Savannah River National Laboratory (June 10, 2011). The national laboratories listed above were provided with a list of rel- evant disciplines to assist them in providing appropriate demographic data. The disciplines included radiation biology, nuclear forensics, nuclear and radiochemistry, radiation chemistry, separations chemistry, environmental radiochemistry, and actinide and isotope geochemistry, as well as topics associated more with the application of these disciplines, such as actinide chemistry and processing, chemistry of special nuclear materials, nuclear fuel cycle expertise, or dose assessment. Each laboratory provided an analy- sis of workforce numbers and demographics by age band cohort and level of degree, provided that the committee present the national laboratory data in this report as a compilation. The estimated current numbers of national laboratory career employees with nuclear and radiochemistry skills, accord- ing to age cohort and degree, are shown in Figure 2-6. Projected demands for nuclear and radiochemistry related skills at national laboratories based on anticipated terminations, one year and 2-5 years from now, are shown in Table 2-5. 191

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