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Speaker Biographies*

Marilyn Albert, Ph.D., is Director of the Division of Cognitive Neuroscience in the Department of Neurology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Director of the Johns Hopkins Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center. She moved to Johns Hopkins in 2003, after having been on the faculty of the Harvard Medical School for 22 years, where she directed the Gerontology Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital. Her major research interests are in the areas of cognitive change with age, disease-related changes of cognition (with a particular focus on Alzheimer’s disease), and the relationship of cognitive change to brain structure and function, as assessed through imaging.

Monique Breteler, M.D., Ph.D., is the Director of Population Health Sciences at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE). In addition to her affiliation with DZNE, Dr. Breteler is a professor of population health sciences at the University of Bonn. In the scientific community, she is especially well-known for her achievements in the Rotterdam Study, in which she found a correlation between vascular diseases and neurological disorders of the brain. Dr. Breteler studied both medicine and epidemiology. She received her M.D. in 1987 from the University of Nijmegen in the

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* Institute of Medicine planning committees are solely responsible for organizing the workshop, identifying topics, and choosing speakers. The responsibility for the published workshop summary rests with the workshop rapporteurs and the institution.



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C Speaker Biographies* Marilyn Albert, Ph.D., is Director of the Division of Cognitive Neurosci- ence in the Department of Neurology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Director of the Johns Hopkins Alzheimer’s Disease Re- search Center. She moved to Johns Hopkins in 2003, after having been on the faculty of the Harvard Medical School for 22 years, where she directed the Gerontology Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital. Her major research interests are in the areas of cognitive change with age, disease-related changes of cognition (with a particular focus on Alzheimer’s disease), and the relationship of cognitive change to brain structure and function, as assessed through imaging. Monique Breteler, M.D., Ph.D., is the Director of Population Health Sci- ences at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE). In addition to her affiliation with DZNE, Dr. Breteler is a professor of popula- tion health sciences at the University of Bonn. In the scientific community, she is especially well-known for her achievements in the Rotterdam Study, in which she found a correlation between vascular diseases and neurological disorders of the brain. Dr. Breteler studied both medicine and epidemiol- ogy. She received her M.D. in 1987 from the University of Nijmegen in the *Institute of Medicine planning committees are solely responsible for organizing the work- shop, identifying topics, and choosing speakers. The responsibility for the published workshop summary rests with the workshop rapporteurs and the institution. 23

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24 ALZHEIMER’S DIAGNOSTIC GUIDELINE VALIDATION Netherlands and her Ph.D. in epidemiology in 1993 from the University of Rotterdam. From 1995 to 2011, she was the head of Neuroepidemiology in the Department of Epidemiology at Erasmus Medical Center at the Uni- versity of Rotterdam, and since 2002 she has held an adjunct professorship at the Harvard School of Public Health. David J. Brooks, M.D., is the Harnett Professor of Neurology and Head of the Centre for Neuroscience in the Department of Medicine, Imperial College, London. He is also a Senior Neurologist in Global Clinical Devel- opment, Medical Diagnostics, GE Healthcare PLC. He has been a member of the Research Advisory Panels of the UK Parkinson’s Disease Society, the German dementia and Parkinson’s networks, and Inserm. He has been a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Disease Research (2002-2006), the UK Medical Research Council Neuroscience and Mental Health Board (2004-2007), and the UK Huntington’s Disease Association, and was Chairman of the Scientific Issues Committee of the Movement Disorder Society (1998-2002) and a Direc- tor of the International Society of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism (1993-1997). His research involves the use of positron emission tomogra- phy and magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose and study the progression of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and their validation of biomarker therapeutic trials. Charles S. DeCarli, M.D., is Director of the University of California, Davis, Alzheimer’s Disease Center. He has a strong interest in behavioral neurol- ogy, with specific emphasis on dementing disorders, including degenerative dementias such as Alzheimer’s disease and frontal dementias. He also fo- cuses on dementias related to movement disorders and vascular disease, as well as cognitive impairment after closed head injury. Dr. DeCarli’s research interests are divided into two areas: using neuroimaging techniques to un- derstand the relationship between brain structure and function with aging and disease; and studying the role of brain antioxidant systems, primarily quinone oxidoreductase, on the pathophysiology and potential treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. DeCarli earned a B.S. from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and an M.D. from the George Washington Uni- versity Medical School. Robert W. Mahley, M.D., Ph.D., is a Senior Investigator at both the Glad- stone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease and the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease and President Emeritus of the Gladstone Institutes. Dr. Mahley is also a Professor of Pathology and Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Mahley is an internationally known expert on heart disease, cholesterol metabolism and, more recently, Alzheimer’s

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25 APPENDIX C disease. He studies plasma lipoproteins and particularly apolipoprotein E (apoE), the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. His seminal research has defined apoE’s critical role in cholesterol homeostasis and atherosclerosis. His Turkish Heart Study shed light on the genetics of low HDL-C. He has also made fundamental contributions to understanding the role of apoE in the nervous system, specifically in nerve injury and regen- eration and in the remodeling of neurites on neuronal cells. These findings laid the groundwork for the explosion of research linking apoE4, a variant of apoE, to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease and neurodegeneration. Dr. Mahley is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. He recently received the Builders of Science Award from Research!America for his lead- ership as Gladstone’s Founding Director and President, guiding its growth to become one of the world’s foremost independent research institutes. After earning a bachelor’s degree from Maryville College in Maryville, Tennessee, in 1963, Dr. Mahley completed both an M.D. and a Ph.D. at Vanderbilt University in 1970. Philip Scheltens, Ph.D., is Professor of Cognitive Neurology and Direc- tor of the Alzheimer Center at the VU University Medical Center in Am- sterdam. His main clinical and research interests are Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, magnetic resonance imaging, PET imaging, and biomarkers. He is active in the field of biomarkers and clinical trials and has been the national Principal Investigator for many studies, including phase 1-3 multicenter clinical trials. He founded and has directed the Alzheimer Center since 2000. He is an active member of several societies, including the Dutch Society for Neurology, the Interna- tional Psychogeriatric Association, the American Academy of Neurology, the Alzheimer Imaging Consortium, the ISTAART Consortium, and the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology. He is Associate Editor of the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry and Book Review Editor of Alzheimer Disease and Associate Disorders. He is Chief Editor of the official journal of the Dutch Society of Neurology (Tijdschrift voor Neurologie en Neurochirurgie). Gabrielle Silver, M.B.B.S., is the Global Head of Neuroscience Marketing at GE Healthcare. Prior to joining GE, she was the CNS Franchise Direc- tor at Eisai. She also was the Therapeutic Area Director at Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS). Before moving to BMS, she was the Senior European Medi- cal Advisor at Eisai. Dr. Silver obtained her M.B.B.S. in Medicine at the University of London, and her B.Sc. in Anatomical Science at the University of Bristol.

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26 ALZHEIMER’S DIAGNOSTIC GUIDELINE VALIDATION William H. Thies, Ph.D., is Vice President for Medical and Scientific Rela- tions at the Alzheimer’s Association, where he oversees the world’s largest private, nonprofit Alzheimer’s disease research grants program. Under his direction, the organization’s annual grant budget has doubled, and the program has designated special focus areas targeting the relationship be- tween cardiovascular risk factors and Alzheimer’s disease, care giving and care systems, and research involving diverse populations. He played a key role in launching Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association, and in establishing the Research Roundtable, a consortium of senior scientists from industry, academia, and government who convene regularly to explore common barriers to drug discovery. In previous work at the American Heart Association (AHA) from 1988-1998, Dr. Thies formed a new stroke division that recently became the American Stroke As- sociation. He also built the Emergency Cardiac Care Program, a continuing medical education program that trains more than 3 million professionals annually. He has worked with the National Institute of Neurological Dis- orders and Stroke to form the Brain Attack Coalition. Prior to joining the AHA, he held faculty positions at Indiana University in Bloomington and the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Thies earned a B.A. in biology from Lake Forest College, Lake Forest, Illinois, and a Ph.D. in pharmacology from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

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