weapons of mass destruction,4 and hence Russia takes its biosecurity responsibilities very seriously. As a result, all, “biological materials are securely protected using modern technology, and the necessary counter-terrorist measures are taken.”5 Furthermore, the national legal framework details procedures to account for the production, use, storage, and transport of biological weapons and related materials and specifies how violators can be penalized.6 Additionally, microbiological and virological research facilities in Golitsino, Pokrov, Vladimir, Koltsovo (Vector Center), Obolensk, and Kazan recently upgraded their security through their participation in the United States Biological Threats Reduction program,7 and in collaboration with the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC), seven institutes invested over $18 million in upgraded operating procedures and physical security.8 During the last three years, two institutes—Vector Center and the Microbiolgical Center in Obolensk —additionally upgraded their biosecurity equipment and services.

The Russian Federation will undoubtedly continue its efforts to modernize its microbiological laboratories and biotechnological facilities in accordance with international standards and new achievements in biosafety and biosecurity will follow.

CONCLUSIONS:

1.   Periodical biosafety and biosecurity upgrades in laboratories working with dangerous pathogens are needed to better protect the environment, personnel, and to prevent possible terrorism cases.

2.   The modernization of educational courses in all areas of biotechnology and medicine should include basic educational modules on biosafety, biosecurity, and bioethics.

3.   The easiest and fastest way to upgrade the national level of biosafety/biosecurity is to study the modern international recommendations and textbooks in this area, to upgrade national biosafety regulations and standards, to modify the national educational programs, and to participate actively in international biosafety meetings and associations.

images

4 Note verbale dated 26 October 2004 from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the United Nations addressed to the Chairman of the Committee. November 2, 2004, Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the United Nations.

5 Second report of the Russian Federation on the implementation of Security Council resolution 1540 (2004). 2004, Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the United Nations. (page 6)

6 Second report of the Russian Federation on the implementation of Security Council resolution 1540 (2004). 2004, Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the United Nations; National Research Council (United States). Committee on Prevention of Proliferation of Biological Weapons., The Biological Threat Reduction Program of the Department of Defense: from foreign assistance to sustainable partnerships. 2007, Washington: National Academies Press. ix, 109 p.

7 National Research Council (United States). Committee on Prevention of Proliferation of Biological Weapons., The Biological Threat Reduction Program of the Department of Defense: from foreign assistance to sustainable partnerships. 2007, Washington: National Academies Press. ix, 109 p. (page 34)

8 Weaver, L.M., Biosafety and Biosecurity Activities of the International Science and Technology Center in the Republics of the Former Soviet Union: Accomplishments, Challenges, and Prospects. Applied Biosafety: Journal of the American Biological Safety Association, 2010. 15(2): pp. 56-59.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement