Appendix C

Workshop Information

Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

URBAN METEOROLOGY: SCOPING THE PROBLEM,
DEFINING THE NEEDS

Committee Meeting and Summer 2011 Community Workshop

Final Meeting Agenda
July 27-29, 2011
National Academies Jonsson Center
314 Quissett
Woods Hole, MA 02543

Workshop Goals

The field of urban meteorology has grown considerably in the past few decades, and a number of recent publications have helped pinpoint pressing needs for scientific advances. To date, however, most assessments of R&D priorities have come from discussions within the scientific community. There is a need for more direct interaction with key ‘end user’ communities, who can help identify their needs. The goal of the workshop is to facilitate a dialog between the research community and the users of urban meteorology information by bringing together scientific experts with representatives from select end user communities.



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Appendix C Workshop Information Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate URBAN METEOROLOGY: SCOPING THE PROBLEM, DEFINING THE NEEDS Committee Meeting and Summer 2011 Community Workshop Final Meeting Agenda National Academies Jonsson Center July 27-29, 2011 314 Quissett Woods Hole, MA 02543 Workshop Goals The field of urban meteorology has grown considerably in the past few de- cades, and a number of recent publications have helped pinpoint pressing needs for scientific advances. To date, however, most assessments of R&D priorities have come from discussions within the scientific community. There is a need for more direct interaction with key ‘end user’ communities, who can help identify their needs. The goal of the workshop is to facilitate a dia- log between the research community and the users of urban meteorology information by bringing together scientific experts with representatives from select end user communities. 157

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158 158 APPENDIX C Wednesday July 27, 2011 7:00 -7:45 A.M. Shuttle Bus Service from Hotel to Jonsson Center (Shuttle Departs every 10-15 minutes) OPEN SESSION: 8:00 A.M. -5:30 P.M.: Carriage House 8:00 A.M. Breakfast in Main House 8:30 A.M. Welcome, Introduction, Purpose of Workshop Chris Elfring, BASC Director John Snow, University of Oklahoma Xubin Zeng, University of Arizona 8:45 A.M. Overview of Urban Meteorology Sue Grimmond, King’s College London Morning Panel Discussion on End-Users: Panelists will each have 10 minutes to speak followed by 20 minutes of general discussion. Questions to be addressed in the morning panel discussions: What are user needs? What needs are not being met, and what are the reasons? If your needs are not being met, how do we address them? Perspective from the Federal Agencies 9:15 A.M. Moderator: Ellis Stanley EPA: S.T. Rao FEMA: Sandra Knight DDOT: Terry Bellamy CDC: George Luber 10:15 A.M. Break End User Perspectives 10:30 A.M Moderator: Stefanie Sarnat

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APPENDIX C 159 Air Quality: Paula Davidson, NOAA/NWS Urban Vulnerability: Olga Wilhelmi, NCAR Emergency: Ellis Stanley, Dewberry Security: Gayle Sugiyama, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Utilities: James Rufo Hill, Seattle Public Utilities Urban Planning: Stuart Gaffin, Columbia University 12:00 P.M. Continued Discussion over LUNCH in the Main House 1:00 P.M. Observations and Modeling of the Urban Environment Walt Dabberdt, Vaisala Afternoon Panel Discussion on End-Users: Panelists will each have 10 minutes to speak followed by 20 minutes of general discussion. Questions to be addressed in the afternoon panel discussions: What are the new capabilities and products needed to better serve users? How can these capabilties and products be effectively communicated to users? Federal Agency Perspectives: Science and Technology 1:30 P.M. Challenges Moderator: Marshall Shepherd NWS: Andy Edman NASA: Marc Imhoff NOAA/OFCM: Sam Williamson DOE: Nancy Brown USGS: Sue Cannon 2:50 P.M. Break Research Community Perspectives: 3:05 P.M. Science and Technology Moderator: Petra Klein Urban Observations: Marshall Shepherd, University of Georgia

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160 160 APPENDIX C Urban Modeling: Teddy R. Holt, Naval Research Laboratory Urbanization of Mesoscale Models and their Operational Use: Martin Best, UK Met Office Urban Meteorology: Tim Oke, University of British Columbia 4:15 P.M. Assignment for Working Groups and Charges *see Charge to the Working Groups document (p. 162) John Snow and Xubin Zeng WG1a WG1b End Users/Applications End Users/Applications Chair: Stefanie Sarnat Chair: Ellis Stanley Rapporteur: Mark Arend Rapporteur: George Schewe NRC staff: Maggie Walser NRC staff: Laurie Geller Room: TBA Room: TBA WG2a WG2b Observations and modeling Observations and modeling Chair: Marshall Shepherd Chair: Petra Klein Rapporteur: Dev Niyogi Rapporteur: James Voogt NRC staff: Chris Elfring NRC staff: Lauren Brown Room: TBA Room: TBA 5:00 P.M. Working Groups: Meet briefly for introduction and discussions Continued Discussion over DINNER: Main House/ 6:00 P.M. Grounds Thursday, July 28, 2011 7:00 -7:45 A.M. Shuttle Bus Service from Hotel to Jonsson Center (Shuttle Departs every 10-15 minutes) 8:00 A.M. Breakfast in Main House

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APPENDIX C 161 OPEN SESSION: 8:30 A.M.-5:00 P.M.: Carriage House Cities of the Future: 8:30 A.M Brian Stone, Georgia Institute of Technology 9.00 A.M. Working Groups Convene to Address Their Charge 12:00 P.M. Continue discussion over LUNCH in the Main House 1:00 P.M Plenary: All Participants Reconvene Each Working Group Rapporteur will present their respective group’s “findings.” The Rapporteurs will each have 15 minutes to present followed by 5 minutes of Q&A. 2:30 P.M. General Discussions Reflections on key issues/questions Next steps 3:15 P.M. Break 3:45 P.M. Working Groups reconvene: • Finalize their findings based on the discussions • Draft outline • Assignment and plan to complete any further input to study committee 5:00 P.M. Workshop Adjourns Optional DINNER: Main House/Grounds 5:30 P.M.

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162 162 APPENDIX C PARTICIPANT LIST Urban Meteorology: Scoping the Problem, Defining the Needs BASC Summer Study-Participant List July 27-28, 2011 Woods Hole, MA BASC Board and Staff Antonio J. Busalacchi, Jr., BASC Chair, University of Maryland Richard E. (Rit) Carbone, NCAR Earth Observing Laboratory Chris Elfring, Board Director, BASC Katie Thomas, Study Director, BASC Rita Gaskins, Administrative Coordinator, BASC Elizabeth Finkelman, Program Assistant, BASC Lauren Brown, Research Associate, BASC Laurie Geller, Senior Program Officer, BASC Maggie Walser, Program Officer, BASC Committee John T. Snow (cochair), BASC member, University of Oklahoma Xubin Zeng (cochair), BASC member, University of Arizona Ellis Stanley, Dewberry Petra Klein, University of Oklahoma Stefanie Sarnat, Emory University Marshall Shepherd, University of Georgia Participants Mark Arend, The City College of New York, CUNY Terry Bellamy, District Department of Transportation, Washington, DC Martin Best, Met Office, United Kingdom Kelley Brookins, Chicago Transit Authority Nancy Brown, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) Susan H. Cannon, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Walt Dabberdt, Vaisala Paula Davidson, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Sheldon Drobot, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Andy Edman, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

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APPENDIX C 163 Stuart Gaffin, Columbia University Sue Grimmond, King’s College, London James Rufo Hill, Seattle Public Utilities Teddy R. Holt, Naval Research Laboratory Marc L. Imhoff, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA Paul Kirshen, Battelle Memorial Institute Kim Klockow, University of Oklahoma Sandra Knight, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) George Luber, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Thomas Matte, New York City Department of Health Dev S. Niyogi, Purdue University Fred Ogden, University of Wyoming Tim Oke, University of British Columbia Brenda Philips, University of Massachusetts, Amherst S. Trivikrama (S.T.) Rao, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) David Sailor, Portland State University George Schewe, Trinity Consultants Brian Stone, Jr., Georgia Institute of Technology Gayle Sugiyama, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) James A. Voogt, University of Western Ontario Olga Wilhelmi, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Samuel P. Williamson, Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology (OFCM), NOAA

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164 164 APPENDIX C CHARGE TO WORKING GROUPS The challenge for the working groups is to move beyond the Day 1 discussions and provide tangible and substantive input to the Committee, which will consider this input as it writes its final report. The working groups will be asked to discuss the questions below and each group’s rapporteur will be asked to prepare slides that summarize the discussion, to present in the plenary session. Key Questions 1. Briefly describe some of the advances in meteorological fore- casting/monitoring in the past decade that have had the most impact on urban areas and why. Were any of these developed specifically for urban uses and, where not, what relationships or synergies led to devel- opments in other areas being found to benefit urban uses? 2. Are there important existing urban-level forecasting/monitoring capabilities that are not being effectively utilized by the relevant end user communities, either due to lack of awareness that such capabilities exist, or failure to provide such information in a usable form? 3. Are there particular needs of specific end user communities that are not being met by current urban-level forecasting/monitoring efforts? 4. Are there emerging technologies in meteorological forecasting/ monitoring that would help contribute to urban dwellers’ safety and well-being? 5. What are some effective ways to strengthen the interactions between urban meteorology researchers and the different end user communities? 6. What new future needs or challenges might be anticipated in light of the potential additional stresses resulting from to be brought by the impacts of global climate change?