Appendix B

Biographies

SPEAKER AND DISCUSSANT BIOGRAPHIES

Sonia Angell, MD, MPH, provides leadership for global noncommunicable disease strategy, policy, and program development at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). She has particular expertise in environmental and clinical care systems policy, programming, and evaluation designed to reduce chronic disease risk. Dr. Angell recently joined the CDC, coming from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene where she directed the Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Control Program. Some of her program’s key accomplishments included regulating the use of trans fat in New York City restaurants, the National Salt Reduction Initiative, establishing nutrition standards for food procured by New York City government agencies, and clinical quality improvement initiatives for blood pressure and cholesterol control. She received her medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco, and completed internal medicine residency training at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. She has a diploma in tropical medicine and hygiene from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and a master’s in public health from the University of Michigan. She is a fellow of the American College of Physicians. She is a former Robert Wood Johnson clinical scholar.

Gene Bukhman, MD, PhD, is an assistant professor of medicine and an assistant professor of global health and social medicine at Harvard Medical School. He is a cardiologist in the Division of Global Health Equity at



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Appendix B Biographies SPEAKER AND DISCUSSANT BIOGRAPHIES Sonia Angell, MD, MPH, provides leadership for global noncommunicable disease strategy, policy, and program development at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). She has particular expertise in environmental and clinical care systems policy, programming, and evalua- tion designed to reduce chronic disease risk. Dr. Angell recently joined the CDC, coming from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene where she directed the Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Control Program. Some of her program’s key accomplishments included regulating the use of trans fat in New York City restaurants, the National Salt Reduction Initiative, establishing nutrition standards for food procured by New York City government agencies, and clinical quality improve- ment initiatives for blood pressure and cholesterol control. She received her medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco, and completed internal medicine residency training at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. She has a diploma in tropical medicine and hygiene from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and a master’s in public health from the University of Michigan. She is a fellow of the American College of Physicians. She is a former Robert Wood Johnson clinical scholar. Gene Bukhman, MD, PhD, is an assistant professor of medicine and an assistant professor of global health and social medicine at Harvard Medi- cal School. He is a cardiologist in the Division of Global Health Equity at 95

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96 COUNTRY-LEVEL DECISION MAKING Brigham and Women’s Hospital and in the Boston VA Healthcare System. By training, Dr. Bukhman is a medical anthropologist and a cardiologist with special competence in echocardiography. He is the cardiology director for Partners In Health. Dr. Bukhman is an expert on strategic planning for non-communicable disease control and serves as the senior technical advi- sor on noncommunicable disease to the Rwandan Ministry of Health. His research has focused on the political and historical context of intervention in this area, as well as the evaluation of programmatic outcomes. He has worked in Rwanda since 2006. In 2010 Dr. Bukhman was appointed as the director of the Program in Global Non-Communicable Disease and Social Change at Harvard Medical School. Arun Chockalingam, MS, PhD, FACC, FAHA, leads the Office of Global Health at the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Prior to this appointment, Dr. Chockalingam was the founding director of the Global Health Program and subsequently served in an enhanced role as the direc- tor of continuing public health education at the Faculty of Health Sciences at the Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada. He received his PhD in cardiac cell physiology and pharmacology from Memorial University of Newfoundland. In addition, he has an extensive and varied career in cardiovascular epidemiology, prevention, government research administra- tion, and global health. Dr. Chockalingam served as senior policy advisor, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Health Canada, and associate director of the Institute of Circulatory and Respiratory Health in the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and he currently serves as secretary general of the World Hypertension League. He has published more than 150 papers and 11 book chapters, served as an editorial board member and reviewer for numerous journals. He has been a reviewer for a number of national and international research granting agencies. He was a member of the authoring committee of the Institute of Medicine’s 2010 report Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World. He is passionate about promoting healthy lifestyles and preventing chronic non- communicable diseases throughout the world. Thomas A. Gaziano, MD, MSc, is an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health. His research interests are in the treatment of cardiovascular disease in devel- oping countries, including the epidemiology and management of its risk factors and the development of decision analytic models to assess the cost- effectiveness of various screening, prevention, and management decisions. He has served as a consultant and author for the Disease Control Priorities Project of the World Bank, World Health Organization, and the Fogarty In-

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97 APPENDIX B ternational Center. He is the co-principal investigator of the United Health and U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute collaborating center of excellence at the University of Cape Town, where he holds an honorary se- nior lectureship. He is co-leader of the Chronic and Cardiovascular Disease Working Group at the Harvard Institute for Global Health. He is certified as a diplomat in internal medicine and cardiovascular diseases. Amanda Glassman, MSc, is the director of the Global Health Policy Pro- gram at the Center for Global Development. She has 20 years of experi- ence working on health and social protection policy and programs in Latin America and elsewhere in the developing world. Prior to her current posi- tion, Glassman was principal technical lead for health at the Inter-American Development Bank, where she led health economics and financing knowl- edge products and policy dialogue with member countries, and was team leader of the Oportunidades conditional cash transfer program. She was also a nonresident fellow at the Brookings Institution. From 2005 to 2007, Glassman was deputy director of the Global Health Financing Initiative at Brookings and carried out policy research on aid effectiveness and domestic financing issues in the health sector in low-income countries. Before joining the Brookings Institution, Glassman designed, supervised, and evaluated health and social protection loans at the Inter-American Development Bank and worked as a Population Reference Bureau fellow at the U.S. Agency for International Development. Glassman holds an MSc from the Harvard School of Public Health and a BA from Brown University, has published on a wide range of health and social protection finance and policy topics, and is editor and co-author of the books From Few to Many: A Decade of Health Insurance Expansion in Colombia (IDB and Brookings, 2010) and The Health of Women in Latin America and the Caribbean (World Bank, 2001). Mireille Goetghebeur, PhD, received an engineering diploma and a PhD in biochemistry from the University of Montpellier in France. Co-founder of BioMedCom, a consulting group specializing in applied research based in Montreal, Canada, she has worked since the mid-1990s at generating and synthesizing data to support evidence-based decision making for health care interventions in numerous therapeutic contexts. Her current research interests focus on developing multi-criteria decision analysis–based tools, processes, and databases to advance health care decision making and prior- ity setting internationally. Principal investigator in the development of the EVIDEM framework, she currently serves as president for the EVIDEM Collaboration. Mireille is also an associate member of the research center of Ste. Justine University Hospital Center in Montreal.

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98 COUNTRY-LEVEL DECISION MAKING Meenu Hariharan, MD, DM, presently the director and chief executive of- ficer of the Indian Institute of Diabetes (a joint venture of the government of Kerala and World-India Diabetes Foundation) and state nodal officer of the National Program for the Prevention and Control of Diabetes, Cardio- vascular Diseases and Stroke, possesses an illustrious career and academic accomplishments. Formerly the director of medical education, Kerala state, India, she is now professor emeritus at the Government Medical College, Trivandrum, and consultant gastroenterologist. A gold medalist in MBBS, her postgraduate qualifications include an MD in internal medicine and doctorate (DM) in gastroenterology. Her major attainments during her career in government include the certificate of appreciation from the gov- ernment of Kerala for disaster management after the 2004 tsunami, and the Best Doctor Award 2007, Kerala State, by the government of Kerala. The major thrust of her field of research interest lies in pancreatic diabe- tes (tropical pancreatitis), a disease almost endemic to Kerala, for which she has had international collaboration with INSERM in France and the Naro Cancer Center in Japan. She has since broadened her perspectives in research to include the awareness, prevention, and control of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and stroke under the aegis of the national control program for the same, stoking many ongoing research projects, and has conducted 245 detection and awareness camps so far, screening 24,540 members of the populace. Emma Herry-Thompson, MD, has been in the health care arena for the past 40 years. Thirteen of those years were spent as a registered nurse. She received her nursing diploma in London, England. Her BSc degree was obtained from the University of Tennessee. She was a 1984 graduate of James H. Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University. She completed post-graduate training in internal medicine and practiced in four U.S. states and Washington, DC, before returning to Grenada after a 32-year absence in January 1998. Dr. Herry-Thompson currently holds the position of chief medical officer, a position she has held for the past 32 months. She also continues to keep a limited internal medicine practice. Prior to joining the public system, she was director of medical education for St. George’s University’s clinical teaching unit for 5 years. Shah Monir Hossain, MBBS, MPhil, MPH, FCPS, is now working as consultant to Program Preparatory Cell (PPC) of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare of Bangladesh. He worked with the government of Bangladesh for 33 years in different academic and executive position. His last assignment was director general of health services of Bangladesh, and he was responsible for policy making, strategy development, and supervis- ing the national health program as chief executive for implementing health

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99 APPENDIX B sector program. He provided results-oriented guidance to effectively plan, organize, implement, manage and coordinate public health activities and human resources in the public sector. At present he is providing technical assistance to prepare a program implementation plan (PIP) for the health sector program for the next 5 years. One of the major components of the PIP is noncommunicable diseases where a strategy and interventions with targeted indicators have been designed to improve the quality of services in both rural and urban setting. Prof. Hossain is also involved in teaching health service management in the Department of Public Health of North South University, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Antonio Infante, MD, MPH, spent the majority of his career in the Chil- ean National Health Service. He began as a general practitioner, and then as a public health specialist he directed primary health care (PHC) clinics; the PHC in a health district; the department of health in Santiago, Chile’s capital; and the North District of Health in Santiago. He also worked in the Ministry of Health in the nutrition area (food programs), in the health reform project, and in the management of health care. Finally, he was un- dersecretary of health. He also has had experience in the educational sector as advisor in the school feeding program and then as chief of the National Students Welfare Agency. He was consultant to the United Nations and to multilateral agencies in Latin America, Africa, and East Europe. Tracey Pérez Koehlmoos, PhD, MHA, is the head of the Health & Family Planning Systems Programme, at ICDDR,B. Dr. Koehlmoos is a health sys- tems scientist who specializes in managing complex tasks, program develop- ment, and capacity building across the spectrum of health systems building blocks. She has lived and worked in Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Indonesia for more than 15 years. Her research areas of interest include the very upstream area of developing health service delivery for the homeless in urban Bangladesh to the downstream translation of evidence to policy with the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare. She heads the national scale-up of zinc (SUZY Project) and is the team leader of the Centre for Systematic Review at ICDDR,B, which focuses on health systems and policy reviews of non-state sector issues in low- and middle-income countries. She founded the Centre for Control of Chronic Diseases in Bangladesh, which features a unique health-systems approach to the issue of noncommunicable disease in resource-poor settings. She is an adjunct professor at the James P. Grant School of Public Health at BRAC University and in the College of Health and Human Services at George Mason University. Her publications appear in the Lancet, PLoS Medicine, the Cochrane Library, and Health Policy among others. She blogs for the British Medical Journal. At ICDDR,B she is co-founder of the Women Scientists and Researchers’ Forum and serves

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100 COUNTRY-LEVEL DECISION MAKING on the scientific council. Her consultancies include the World Food Pro- gramme, the World Bank, and the World Health Organization. E. Francis Martin, MD, MPH, is a graduate of St. George’s University and works in the emergency room at the General Hospital. Dr. Martin has a profound interest in primary health care, advocating for health promotion as pivotal to disease prevention. He has committed himself to the cause of healthy living by recommending lifestyle changes, helping people to connect the dots that link behavior to diseases. Dr. Martin also conducted research on the effects of Sahara dust on asthma visits to the emergency room in Grenada, the abstract of which was accepted by the American Thoracic Society for its May 2011 international conference. Dr. Martin published the article “A community approach and involvement in primary health care” in the Grenada Medical Journal. Presently Dr. Martin is spearheading the primary health care revitalization program in Grenada. Montserrat Meiro-Lorenzo, MD, MPH, MPP, is a senior public health specialist. She is responsible for the dialogue on noncommunicable diseases at the World Bank’s Health Nutrition and Population group. She has more than 20 years’ experience in international health and development in Africa, Latin America, and East Asia, ranging from clinical care to health services management and public policy dialogue. She has designed and managed programs and projects in areas that include hospital care, tuberculosis con- trol, health information systems, primary health care, nutrition, HIV/AIDS, results-based financing, and public health insurance. She holds a medical degree and master’s degrees in both public health and public policy. Andrew Mirelman, MPH, is a current PhD candidate in the International Health Department at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH). His research interests are in applied demographic and economic techniques for public health, specifically, economic evaluation of noncommunicable disease prevention, rational decision-making, and methods for assessing economic impacts. Mr. Mirelman graduated in 2009 with an MPH from JHSPH, conducting a thesis project in Lima, Peru on national-level decision making for immunization introductions. He has continued his work with the International Vaccine Access Center group at JHSPH, working on their economics team. Current dissertation-level work is being conducted on the economic impact of chronic diseases and associ- ated risk factors in Bangladesh, partnering with the International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) as part of the U.S. Na- tional Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute collaborating centers of excellence for chronic diseases. He has been a teaching assistant for several classes at JHSPH, including Managing Health Services Organizations, Health Systems

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101 APPENDIX B in Lower and Middle Income Countries, and Understanding Cost-Effective Analysis for Healthcare Professionals. Before coming to JHSPH, he worked for a think tank on health and security and for a consulting firm in Wash- ington, DC, in the field of occupational health. He received a BS in biomedi- cal engineering from the University of Virginia in 2006. Johanna Ralston has been chief executive officer of World Heart Federa- tion since February 1, 2011. The World Heart Federation, headquartered in Geneva, comprises more than 200 member organizations in 120 countries and leads the global fight against heart disease and stroke, with a focus on low- and middle-income countries. The World Heart Federation is one of the founding members of the NCD Alliance, the lead civil society organiza- tion focusing on noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) leading up the United Nations high-level meeting on NCDs and beyond. Ms. Ralston’s work in global chronic disease has spanned several organizations, and she has a par- ticular interest in strengthening local capacity and advocating for integrated approaches. Prior to joining the World Heart Federation, Ms. Ralston was vice president, global strategies at the American Cancer Society (ACS). She joined the ACS in 1999 as its first-ever director of international programs and development and went on to build a department with training pro- grams and partnerships in over 80 countries in capacity building, tobacco control, cancer control advocacy, and, more recently, in global advocacy with key partners including the World Health Organization and the World Economic Fund as well as the NCD Alliance. Ms. Ralston’s work in global health has also included positions as a program development adviser at the International Planned Parenthood Federation of Latin America and in advocacy with AIDS organizations in Boston and New York. A dual citizen of the United States and Sweden, Ms. Ralston has lived and worked in Eu- rope, Asia, and the United States. She is an alumna of the Harvard Business School Advanced Management Program, and she has studied public health at Harvard and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Scott Ratzan, MD, MPA, is vice president of global health at Johnson & Johnson and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives. Dr. Ratzan is co-chair of the United Nations Secretary General’s Joint Action Plan on Women and Children’s Health Innovation Working Group. He presented the pharmaceutical industry framework on noncommunicable diseases as the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations representative at the United Nations interactive hearing in June 2011. He has testified before the U.S. Congressional Committee on the Millennium Development Goals concerning opportunities for success with the private sector engagement in health diplomacy. His books include Mad Cow Crisis: Health and the

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102 COUNTRY-LEVEL DECISION MAKING Public Good, Attaining Global Health: Challenges and Opportunities, and AIDS: Effective Health Communication for the 90s. He received his MD from the University of Southern California, his MPA from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and his MA in communications from Emerson College. Karin Stenberg has worked as a health economist at the World Health Or- ganization (WHO) headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, since 2004. As a staff member of the department of child and adolescent health and develop- ment from 2004 to 2008, she supported models for estimating the cost of scaling up child health interventions at the global and country levels and provided support to ministries of health in low-income countries for esti- mating costs associated with implementing national child health strategies. Based with the WHO Department of Health Systems Financing since 2008, she is responsible for the development and application of tools for costing, cost-effectiveness, and expenditure tracking, with a primary focus on health systems and WHO’s millennium development goals. She is a member of the inter-agency working group that is developing the OneHealth model for supporting country strategic health planning, and she has supported multiple global cost and impact assessment analyses with advocacy implica- tions, including the International Health Partnership high-level task force on innovative international financing for health systems and the global strategy for women’s and children’s health. Neff Walker, PhD, is currently a senior scientist in the Department of Inter- national Health of the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. At Johns Hopkins, Neff’s work has focused on the development of the Lives Saved Tool (LiST) a program that is used to estimate the impact of scaling up interventions on maternal, neonatal, and child mortality. Be- fore coming to Johns Hopkins he spent three years at UNICEF as the senior advisor for estimation and modeling related to the impact of HIV/AIDS as well as serving as UNICEF’s focal point for the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group. From 1998 through 2003 Neff worked as the senior advi- sor for statistics and modeling at United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS. In both positions a primary focus of his work was the development and implementation of standard methods for estimation and modeling related to disease burden. Prior to working at the United Nations, Neff spent 15 years working as a faculty member in the areas of computer science and human factors. Gerald Yonga, MBChB, MMed, MBA, FESC, FACC, is the chair and asso- ciate professor of medicine and cardiology at Aga Khan University Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya. He is also the national chair of the Kenya Cardiac So-

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103 APPENDIX B ciety and the interim national chair of the Kenya Non-Communicable Dis- ease Alliance. Dr. Yonga has over 20 years of experience running internal medicine and cardiology diagnostic and treatment clinics in both the public and the private sector. His professional mission is to help develop high- quality accessible health care services, health care workers, institutions, and health care systems in the East African region. He has lectured extensively and taught courses on best practices and capacity building in cardiology to nurses and doctors in the Kenya Ministry of Health, medical students, and experienced health professionals. Dr. Yonga’s research interests include the epidemiology, primary and secondary prevention, and primary care of noncommunicable diseases, and he has published more than 30 articles in peer-reviewed journals. Dr. Yonga received his MBChB and MMed from the University of Nairobi and his MBA in health care management from Regent Business School in Durban, South Africa. WORKSHOP PLANNING COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES1 Rachel A. Nugent, PhD (Chair), is director of the Disease Control Priorities Network and senior research scientist at the Department of Global Health, University of Washington. She has 25 years of experience as a develop- ment economist, managing and carrying out research and policy analysis in the fields of health, agriculture, and the environment. Prior to joining the University of Washington, Dr. Nugent was deputy director for global health at the Center for Global Development. She previously worked at the Population Reference Bureau, the Fogarty International Center of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, and the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. She also served as associate professor and chair of the eco- nomics department at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington. Dr. Nugent’s recent publications address the cost-effectiveness of noncom- municable disease interventions, the economic impacts of chronic disease, and the health impacts of fiscal policies. Dr. Nugent was a committee mem- ber for the Institute of Medicine study Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World: A Critical Challenge to Achieve Global Health. Kalipso Chalkidou, MD, PhD, is the founding director of the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence’s international program, helping governments build technical and institutional capacity for using evidence to inform health policy. She is interested in how local information, local expertise and local institutions can drive scientific and legitimate health care 1 Institute of Medicine planning committees are solely responsible for organizing the work- shop, identifying topics, and choosing speakers. The responsibility for the published workshop summary rests with the workshop rapporteur and the institution.

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104 COUNTRY-LEVEL DECISION MAKING resource allocation decisions. She has been involved in Chinese rural health reform and also in national health reform projects in Colombia, Turkey, and the Middle East, working with the World Bank, the Pan American Health Organization, the UK Department for International Development, and the Inter-American Development Bank as well as with national gov- ernments. She holds a doctorate in molecular biology from the University of Newcastle and an MD (Hon.) from the University of Athens and is an honorary senior lecturer at the London School of Hygiene and Tropi- cal Medicine, a senior advisor on international policy at the U.S. Center for Medical Technology Policy and visiting faculty at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute for Bioethics. Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, serves the Mount Sinai Medical Center as director of Mount Sinai Heart, the Zena and Michael A. Wiener Cardio- vascular Institute, and the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Cardiovascular Health. He is the Richard Gorlin, MD/Heart Research Foundation Professor at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Dr. Fuster is the general director of the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardio- vasculares Carlos III in Madrid, Spain. After receiving his medical degree from Barcelona University and completing an internship at Hospital Clinic in Barcelona, Dr. Fuster spent several years at the Mayo Clinic, first as a resident and later as professor of medicine and consultant in car- diology. In 1981 he came to Mount Sinai School of Medicine as head of cardiology. From 1991 to 1994 he was Mallinckrodt Professor of Medi- cine at Harvard Medical School and chief of cardiology at Massachusetts General Hospital. He returned to Mount Sinai in 1994 as director of the Zena and Michael A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute and, most recently, he has been named the director of Mount Sinai Heart. Dr. Fuster is a past president of the American Heart Association, immediate past president of the World Heart Federation, a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, a former member of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Advisory Council, and former chairman of the fellowship training directors program of the American College of Car- diology. Twenty-seven distinguished universities throughout the world have granted Dr. Fuster Honoris Causa. He has published more than 800 articles on the subjects of coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis, and thrombosis, and he has become the lead editor of two major textbooks on cardiology and of three books related to health for the public in Spain (best sellers, presently being translated into English). Dr. Fuster has been appointed editor-in-chief of the Nature journal that focuses on cardio- vascular medicine. Dr. Fuster is the only cardiologist to receive all four major research awards from the four major cardiovascular organizations: the Distinguished Researcher Award (Interamerican Society of Cardiol-

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105 APPENDIX B ogy, 2005), the Andreas Gruntzig Scientific Award (European Society of Cardiology, 1992), Distinguished Scientist (American Heart Associa- tion, 2003), and the Distinguished Scientist Award (American College of Cardiology, 1993). In addition, he has received the Principe de Asturias Award of Science and Technology (the highest award given to Spanish- speaking scientists), the Distinguished Service Award from the American College of Cardiology, the Gold Heart Award (American Heart Associa- tion’s highest award), and the Gold Medal of the European Society of Cardiology (the highest award, Vienna, September 2007). Dr. Fuster has four ongoing projects as part of the World Heart Federation: “Pro- moting health as a priority” in children of Bogotá with Sesame Street, “Promoting health as a priority” in adults in the island of Grenada, a cardiovascular disease polypill developed in Spain for middle- and low- income countries, and a project with Jeffrey and Sonia Sachs focused on chronic diseases (as an addition to the Millennium Project) in the African villages (Rwanda). Dr. Fuster was the committee chair for the IOM study Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World: A Critical Challenge to Achieve Global Health. Stephen Jan, PhD, is a senior health economist at the George Institute for Global Health. He also holds an associate professorship in the Sydney Medical School at the University of Sydney and is an associate at the Menzies Centre for Health Policy. Dr. Jan’s areas of research interest are economic evaluation alongside clinical and public health studies, indigenous health, health systems research, the analysis of the household economic impact of chronic illness, institutionalist economics, and health policy. He has published widely in the medical, public health, health policy and health economics literature and has co-authored two textbooks in health economics and financing. His current projects are set in China, various countries in Southeast Asia, and Australia. He is the lead chief investigator on an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council-funded capacity-building grant in health services research that provides traineeships for a number of health economics researchers at the George Institute and the University of Sydney. Over the course of his career he has acted as an advisor for numerous local and international agencies, including agencies within state and national governments in Australia, the World Health Or- ganization, and the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He was an invited speaker and was commissioned to author a paper as part of the initial IOM study Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World: A Critical Challenge to Achieve Global Health. Peter R Lamptey, MD, DrPH, is based in Accra, Ghana, and is the presi- dent of public health programs at Family Health International (FHI360).

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106 COUNTRY-LEVEL DECISION MAKING Dr. Lamptey is an internationally recognized public health physician and expert in developing countries, with particular emphasis on communicable and noncommunicable diseases. With a career at FHI spanning more than 25 years, Dr. Lamptey has been instrumental in establishing FHI as one of the world’s leading international nongovernmental organizations in imple- menting HIV/AIDS prevention, care, treatment, and support programs. His experience in HIV/AIDS efforts internationally includes collaboration with the World Bank to design and monitor the China Health IX HIV/AIDS Project. From 1997 to 2007 Dr. Lamptey directed the 10-year Implement- ing AIDS Prevention and Care (IMPACT) project. The IMPACT project encompassed HIV/AIDS programs in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Ca- ribbean, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East. He is the former chair of the Monitoring the AIDS Pandemic (MAP) Network, a global network of more than 150 HIV/AIDS experts in 50 countries that was formed in 1996 by the AIDS Control and Prevention (AIDSCAP) project, the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights of the Harvard School of Public Health, and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS. Dr. Lamptey delivered the HIV prevention plenary speeches at the world AIDS conferences held in Berlin, Germany, in 1993 and in Durban, South Africa, in 2000. From 1991 to 1997 Dr. Lamptey directed AIDSCAP, funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and implemented by FHI. The largest international HIV/AIDS prevention program undertaken to date, AIDSCAP consisted of more than 800 projects in 50 countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Prior to his work with AIDSCAP, he directed AIDSTECH, also funded by USAID as a global HIV/ AIDS project and implemented by FHI from 1987 to 1992. Born in Ghana, Dr. Lamptey began his career as a district medical officer there, first in the Salaga district, where he was responsible for preventive and clinical health services for 200,000 individuals, and then for the USAID-funded Danfa Comprehensive Rural Health Family Planning Project. He received his medical degree from the University of Ghana, a master’s degree in public health from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a doctorate in public health from the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Lamptey was a committee member for the IOM study Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World: A Critical Challenge to Achieve Global Health. Derek Yach, MBChB, DSc, MPH, has played a leading global role in many aspects of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) within the private, public, and foundation world for the past two decades. He is senior vice president of global health and agricultural policy at PepsiCo. He has headed global health at the Rockefeller Foundation, been professor of global health at Yale University, and is a former executive director of the World Health Or- ganization (WHO). At the WHO he served as cabinet director for non-com- municable diseases and mental health under Director-General Gro Harlem

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107 APPENDIX B Brundtland, during which time he led development of WHO’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, the Global Strategy on Diet and Physical Activity, and WHO’s World Health Report on Mental Health. Dr. Yach established the Centre for Epidemiological Research at the South African Medical Research Council. He has authored or co-authored more than 200 articles covering the breadth of global health. These include leading thought pieces within NCDs over the last 20 years. He serves on advisory boards of the Clinton Global Initiative, the Chicago Council on International Affairs’ Agricultural Development Initiative, the World Economic Forum’s New Vi- sion for Agriculture, the Fogarty International Centre of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, and the World Food Program USA. He is regular plenary speaker and moderator of global and national meetings related to health and development. Dr. Yach has degrees in medicine (Cape Town) and public health (Johns Hopkins) and an honorary D.Sc. from Georgetown University. Dr. Yach was a committee member for the IOM study Promot- ing Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World: A Critical Challenge to Achieve Global Health. INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE STAFF BIOGRAPHIES Bridget B. Kelly, MD, PhD (IOM Project Director), is a senior program officer with the Institute of Medicine’s Board on Global Health. She was the study director for the recent report Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World: A Critical Challenge to Achieve Global Health, and continues to direct dissemination efforts for the report. She is also the study co-director for the congressionally mandated Institute of Medicine evaluation of U.S. global HIV/AIDS programs. She first came to the Na- tional Academies in September 2007 as a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellow. Prior to joining the Board on Global Health in September 2008, she worked on the Board on Children, Youth, and Families for projects on prevention of mental, emotional, and behav- ioral disorders among children, youth, and young adults; on depression, parenting practices, and child development; and on strengthening benefit- cost methodology for the evaluation of early childhood interventions. She holds both an MD and a PhD in neurobiology, which she completed as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program at Duke University. She received her BA in biology and neuroscience from Williams College, where she was also the recipient of the Hubbard Hutchinson Fellowship in fine arts. In addition to her work in science and health, she has more than 10 years of experience in grassroots nonprofit arts administration. Collin Weinberger is a research associate at the Institute of Medicine’s Board on Global Health where he serves as a member of the research staff for the ongoing dissemination efforts around the 2010 report Promoting

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108 COUNTRY-LEVEL DECISION MAKING Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World: A Critical Challenge to Achieve Global Health as well as for the PEPFAR outcomes and impact evaluation. He has also served as research staff for the IOM’s Forum on Microbial Threats. Prior to joining the IOM, he was a communications associate at Global Health Strategies, a communications and advocacy consultancy specializing in diseases of the developing world. He also spent a year as a volunteer with Partners in Health/Socios en Salud in Lima, Peru, where he worked with the organization’s children’s health, multi-drug- resistant tuberculosis, and HIV/AIDS programs. He received his bachelor’s degree in health and societies from the University of Pennsylvania. Leigh Carroll is a senior program assistant with the Institute of Medicine’s Board on Global Health. She is involved in dissemination activities for the 2010 report Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World: A Critical Challenge to Achieve Global Health, as well as in the evaluation of PEPFAR-supported global HIV/AIDS programs. Before coming to the IOM, she spent two years in rural Tanzania teaching high school science through the Peace Corps. She received her BS in neuroscience from the University of Rochester in 2008. Patrick Kelley, MD, DrPH, joined the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in July 2003 as the director of the Board on Global Health. He has subsequently also been appointed the director of the Board on African Science Academy Development. Dr. Kelley has overseen a portfolio of IOM expert consensus studies and convening activities on subjects as wide ranging as the evalu- ation of the U.S. emergency plan for international AIDS relief, the role of border quarantine programs for migrants in the 21st century, sustainable surveillance for zoonotic infections, and the programmatic approach to can- cer in low- and middle-income countries. He also directs a unique capacity- building effort, the African Science Academy Development Initiative, which over 10 years aims to strengthen the capacity of African academies to advise their governments on scientific matters. Prior to coming to the National Academies Dr. Kelley served in the U.S. Army for more than 23 years as a physician, residency director, epidemiologist, and program manager. In his last Department of Defense (DoD) position, Dr. Kelley founded and directed the DoD Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System. This responsibility entailed managing surveillance and capacity building partnerships with numerous elements of the federal government and with health ministries in more than 45 developing countries. Dr. Kelley is an experienced communicator, having lectured in English or Spanish in more than 20 countries and published more than 64 scholarly papers, book chapters, and monographs. Dr. Kelley obtained his MD from the University of Virginia and his DrPH in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.