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Study Committee Biographical Information Louis J. Lanzerotti, Chair, is Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Physics at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Dr. Lanzerotti is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He is retired Distinguished Member of Technical Staff of Lucent Technolo- gies, where his responsibilities included supervision of laboratories and research and development. His principal research interests include space plasmas, geophysics, and engineering problems related to the impacts of atmospheric and space processes and the space environment on space and terrestrial technologies. He has served as chair of a number of National Research Council (NRC) boards and committees, including the Space Studies Board, the Committee for the Assessment of Options for Extend- ing the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Army Research Labo- ratory Technical Assessment Board. He has been principal investigator (PI) on National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and commercial space satellite missions and is currently PI for instruments on the NASA dual spacecraft Radiation Belt Storm Probes mission, which is scheduled for launch in May 2012. Dr. Lanzerotti holds a BS in engineer- ing physics from the University of Illinois and master’s and doctoral degrees in physics from Harvard University. Dennis C. Bley is President of Buttonwood Consulting, Inc., a Manag- ing Partner in the WreathWood Group, and a member of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Com- mission. He has more than 40 years of experience in nuclear and electrical 197

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198 || The Safety Promise and Challenge of Automotive Electronics engineering, plant and human modeling for probabilistic risk assess- ment, and expert elicitation. He conducts research in human reliability analysis, probabilistic risk assessment of technological systems, and mod- eling uncertainties. Dr. Bley has a PhD in nuclear engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a BSEE from the Uni- versity of Cincinnati. He is recognized for developing and applying prob- abilistic risk assessment to a wide range of engineered facilities and has lectured at universities, industries, and government on all aspects of risk assessment. He has also authored many papers and reports on risk assess- ment techniques and methods. He has served on NRC and government committees evaluating such diverse topics as railroad safety, nuclear energy systems, disposal of chemical weapons in the Army’s stockpile, airport operations, the space shuttle, and chemical facilities. Raymond M. Brach is a consultant in the field of accident reconstruc- tion and a professor emeritus of the Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame. He is a Fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). Other professional memberships include the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the Acoustical Society of America, the Institution of Noise Control Engineers, and the National Association of Professional Accident Reconstruction Specialists. He was granted a PhD in engineering mechanics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and BS and MS degrees in mechanical engineering from Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago. His specialized areas of teaching and research include mechanical design, mechanics, vibrations, acoustics, applications of statistics and quality control, vehicle dynamics, accident reconstruction, and microparticle dynamics. He is a licensed professional engineer in the state of Indiana. In addition to more than 100 research papers and numerous invited lectures, he has authored Mechanical Impact Dynamics, which was published by Wiley Interscience in 1991, and is a coauthor of Uncertainty Analysis for Forensic Science, Lawyers and Judges Publishing Company, 2004, and Vehicle Accident Analysis and Reconstruction Methods, published by SAE, 2005. Daniel L. Dvorak is a Chief Technologist in the Systems and Software Division at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Tech- nology. Dr. Dvorak leads NASA’s Software Architecture Review Board for real-time embedded flight software, he led the NASA study of flight software complexity, and he contributed to a NASA study of fault man- agement practices in mission-critical systems and software. Before 1996

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199 Study Committee Biographical Information || he worked at Bell Laboratories. Dr. Dvorak’s interests include model- centric engineering, control architectures for robotic systems, human- rated automation, and verification and validation. Dr. Dvorak holds a PhD in computer science from the University of Texas at Austin, an MS in computer engineering from Stanford University, and a BS in electri- cal engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. David Gerard is an Associate Professor of Economics at Lawrence Uni- versity. He was previously Executive Director of the Center for the Study and Improvement of Regulation in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. His area of expertise is risk regulation and focuses on the interrelationships between regulation and technological change. His current research includes the regulation of vehicle safety, transportation fuels, automobile emissions, and carbon capture and sequestration. He earned a BA from Grinnell College and an MS and a PhD in economics from the University of Illinois. Deepak K. Goel is President and founder of the automotive electronics consulting company TechuServe LLC. He provides expertise in diverse areas such as “Best in World EE” designs; supplier development; low-cost sourcing; and profitable automotive electronic business growth, automo- tive part cost reduction, and product cost management. Before joining TechuServe, he held senior management and executive positions at Ford Motor Company. Since receiving his doctorate from Syracuse University, Dr. Goel has held several senior management, business leadership, and technical management positions in Dearborn, Michigan, at Ford Motor and Visteon; Ford Microelectronics in Colorado Springs, Colorado; Wang Laboratories in Lowell, Massachusetts; and IT&T in Shelton, Connecticut. He was an adjunct professor at the University of Colorado and Bridgeport University. He managed the design and launch of several electronic sub- systems for all North American Ford vehicle programs at more than 20 North American assembly plants. In this capacity, while working with suppliers from the United States, Europe, China, and India, he had a unique opportunity to mentor the global supply base on how to meet the original equipment manufacturer cost, quality, and launch support needs. He spent more than 14 years in product development examining EE sub- system designs for defect avoidance and prevention. Daniel Jackson is Professor of Computer Science at MIT and a MacVicar Teaching Fellow. He is the lead designer of the Alloy modeling language

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200 || The Safety Promise and Challenge of Automotive Electronics and the author of Software Abstractions: Logic, Language, and Analysis (MIT Press, 2006), and he was recently chair of the committee that produced a National Academies report titled Software for Dependable Systems: Suffi- cient Evidence? (May 2007). He received his MA from Oxford University in physics and his SM and PhD from MIT in computer science. He has been a software engineer for Logica (United Kingdom) and Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He has broad interests in many areas of software engineering, especially in spec- ification and design, critical systems, and formal methods. Linos J. Jacovides retired as Director, Delphi Research Laboratories, a position he held from 1998 to 2007. Dr. Jacovides joined General Motors (GM) Research and Development in 1967 and became department head of electrical engineering in 1985. His areas of research were the inter- actions between power electronics and electrical machines in electric vehicles and locomotives. He later transitioned to Delphi with a group of researchers from GM to set up the Delphi Research Laboratories. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and was President of the Industry Applications Society of IEEE in 1990. He received a BS in electrical engineering and an MS in machine theory from the University of Glasgow, Scotland. He received a PhD in genera- tor control systems from the Imperial College, University of London. Dr. Jacovides is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Pradeep Lall is the Thomas Walter Professor in the Auburn University Department of Mechanical Engineering, with a joint appointment in the Department of Finance. He is the Director of the National Science Foundation Center for Advanced Vehicle and Extreme Environment Electronics at Auburn University. His research areas are in electronic reliability, prognostics, material constitutive behavior, nanocomposites, failure mechanisms, life prediction models, and explicit dynamics. He is author or coauthor of two books, 11 chapters, and more than 250 jour- nal and conference papers in the field of electronics packaging, with emphasis on design, modeling, and predictive techniques. He is a Fellow of ASME, recipient of the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering Senior Faculty Research Award, and a Six Sigma Black Belt in Statistics. He is the recipient of three Motorola Outstanding Innovation Awards and five Motorola Engineering Awards. Dr. Lall is an associate editor of ASME’s Journal of Electronic Packaging and two IEEE journals, Transactions on Com- ponents and Packaging Technologies and Transactions on Electronics Packaging

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201 Study Committee Biographical Information || Manufacturing. He earned a BE from the University of Delhi, an MS and a PhD from the University of Maryland, and an MBA from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. John D. Lee is the Emerson Professor in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Pre- viously he was with the University of Iowa and was the director of human factors research at the National Advanced Driving Simulator. Before moving to the University of Iowa, he was a research scientist at the Battelle Human Factors Transportation Center for 6 years. He is a coauthor of the textbook An Introduction to Human Factors Engineering and the author or coauthor of 170 articles. He recently helped edit the book Driver Distraction: Theory, Effects, and Mitigation. He received the Ely Award for best paper in the journal Human Factors (2002) and the best paper award from the journal Ergonomics (2005). He served as a member of the NRC Committee on Human–Systems Integration and has served on several other NRC committees. Dr. Lee serves on the editorial board of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making; Cognition, Technology, and Work; and International Journal of Human Factors Modeling and Simulation. He is associate editor for the journals Human Factors and IEEE Transac- tions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics. His research focuses on the safety and acceptance of complex human–machine systems by considering how technology mediates attention. Research interests include trust in technology, advanced driver assistance systems, and driver distraction. Adrian K. Lund is President of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and the affiliated Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI). Before becoming president in January 2006, Dr. Lund held numerous positions at the institutes. Trained initially as a psychologist, Dr. Lund has been involved in health-related research since 1975. He joined the institute in 1981 as a behavioral scientist and became senior vice president for research in 1993, chief operating officer of the institute and HLDI in 2001, and president in 2006. Dr. Lund is a highway safety expert and is consulted frequently by print and electronic media reporters. He appears regularly on television news magazine shows and on network news programs. He is the author of numerous scientific papers and has served on the boards and committees of many highway safety groups. Michael J. Oliver is Vice President for Electrical/Electromagnetic Com- patibility (EMC) Engineering at MAJR Products Corporation. An expert

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202 || The Safety Promise and Challenge of Automotive Electronics in electromagnetic interference and radio frequency interference shield- ing technology, military shelter electrical EMC systems, and high-power antenna–radar dome (radome) design, Mr. Oliver has more than 20 years of experience in EMC and electromagnetic environmental effects in both military and commercial applications. Mr. Oliver holds three patents on EMC shielding and thermal management devices, and he has performed open and anechoic chamber radiated tests to military standards by uti- lizing various radiated test systems. He is the author of numerous pub- lications and white papers on electromagnetic shielding products and military antenna–radome test methodology standards. A senior member of IEEE, Mr. Oliver currently serves on the board of directors of the IEEE EMC Society; as Chairman of the IEEE EMC Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, chapter; and as Cochairman of the SAE EMC Committee. He serves as Chairman of the 2012 IEEE EMC Symposium, Pittsburgh, and is a mem- ber of the IEEE EMC Standards Advisory Coordination Committee and the dB Society. William A. Radasky is Founder, President, and Managing Engineer of Metatech Corporation, which provides engineering solutions to prob- lems in the areas of electromagnetic environmental effects, including electromagnetic interference and compatibility, nuclear and lightning electromagnetic pulse, and electrostatic discharge. He began his career in 1968 at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, where he worked with the early high-altitude electromagnetic pulse codes. He founded Metatech Corporation in 1984. At Metatech, he has managed a series of projects to develop electromagnetic hardening measures and test methods to verify their performance. He has also been active in the development of com- mercial EMC standards with the International Electrotechnical Commis- sion (IEC) to protect commercial systems from all types of electromagnetic threats. He served on the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) technical committee dealing with automotive EMC (ISO TC22/ SC3/WG3) as a liaison between the ISO EMC automotive engineers and the IEC TC 77 committee, which develops basic EMC test standards for electronics equipment. In 2004, he was awarded the Lord Kelvin Medal by IEC for exceptional service in the development of international stan- dards. He is a Fellow of IEEE and serves as Chairman of TC-5 (High- Power Electromagnetics) for the IEEE EMC Society. He has authored more than 400 publications on EMC subjects. He holds a BS from the U.S. Air Force Academy, an MS from the University of New Mexico, and

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203 Study Committee Biographical Information || a PhD in electrical engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara. Nadine B. Sarter is Associate Professor in the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering and the Center for Ergonomics at the Uni- versity of Michigan. She teaches courses in cognitive ergonomics and human factors. She was previously on the faculty in the Department of Industrial, Systems, and Welding Engineering and the Institute for Ergo- nomics at Ohio State University. Before moving to Ohio State, she served on the faculty of the Institute of Aviation at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, where she held coappointments with the Depart- ments of Psychology, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, and the Beckman Institute. Her research interests include human–automation communication and coordination (primarily in high-risk, event-driven domains such as aviation), multimodal human–machine interfaces and interaction, error prevention and management, and attention and inter- ruption management. Her research is conducted in application domains such as aviation, military operations, medicine, and automobiles. She is associate editor for Human Factors; IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics; and IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems. She is also a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Experimental Psychology. She has served on several NRC committees, including the Committee on Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aviation Safety Inspector Standards, the Committee for Evaluating Shipboard Display of Automated Identification Systems, and the Committee for a Review of the Federal Railroad Administration R&D Programs. She earned a BS in psychology and an MS in applied and experimental psychology from the University of Hamburg. She earned a PhD in industrial and systems engineering from Ohio State University. James W. Sturges retired in 2009 from Lockheed Martin Corporation, where he had been Director, Engineering Processes, and Director, Mis- sion Assurance. Before that he was Vice President, Engineering and Total Quality, at Loral Air Traffic Control/Lockheed Martin Air Traffic Man- agement, and C3I Strategic Business Area Director for Loral Tactical Defense Systems, Arizona. He also had been a naval aviator and anti- submarine warfare officer for the U.S. Navy. He has a BFA from the University of North Carolina and an MS in aeronautics from the Naval Postgraduate School at Monterey, California. He is an Associate Fellow and member of the Standards Executive Council and past chair of the

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204 || The Safety Promise and Challenge of Automotive Electronics Systems Engineering Technical Committee of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Dennis F. Wilkie is Senior Vice President in the Management Consult- ing Division of Compass Group, Ltd. Before joining Compass Group, he was Corporate Vice President and Chief of Staff for the Integrated Elec- tronic Systems Sector at Motorola, Inc. He spent most of his career at Ford Motor Company, where he retired as Corporate Vice President for Business Development. His work over the years focused on the applica- tion of control theory and systems engineering to automobiles and the field of transportation. He worked on infrastructure issues, such as automated highways, automated transportation systems, and intelli- gent transportation systems. In recent years, he has focused on the uti- lization of electronics and wireless technology for bringing new levels of convenience, safety, and information to the vehicle. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2000 and is a Fellow of SAE. He holds BS and MS degrees in electrical engineering from Wayne State University, a PhD in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois, and an MS in management (Sloan Fellow) from MIT.