Appendix B

Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches

Richard A. Meserve (U.S. Chair) became the ninth president of the Carnegie Institution for Science in 2003. Dr. Meserve was the chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) from October 1999 until March 2003. He is currently Senior of Counsel in the Washington, D.C. law firm of Covington & Burling, where he was a partner before joining the USNRC. He devoted his legal practice to technical issues arising in environmental and toxic tort litigation, counseling scientific societies and high-tech companies, and nuclear licensing. Dr. Meserve also served as an adviser to the President’s Science and Technology Advisor from 1977-1981, and as a law clerk to Justice Harry A. Blackmun of the United States Supreme Court and Judge Benjamin Kaplan of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. Among other affiliations, he is a member of the American Philosophical Society and an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the American Physical Society. He has served as chairman or a member of numerous committees of the National Academies, including the Committee on Science, Technology and Law, the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems, the Board on Radioactive Waste Management, and the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board. He also was chair of the Committee on Upgrading Russian Capabilities for Controlling Highly Enriched Uranium and Plutonium. He received his bachelor’s degree from Tufts University in 1966, a law degree from Harvard in 1975, and his Ph.D. degree in applied physics from Stanford in 1976. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2003.



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Appendix B Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches Richard A. Meserve (U.S. Chair) became the ninth president of the Carnegie Institution for Science in 2003. Dr. Meserve was the chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) from October 1999 until March 2003. He is currently Senior of Counsel in the Washington, D.C. law firm of Covington & Burling, where he was a partner before joining the USNRC. He devoted his legal practice to technical issues arising in environmental and toxic tort litigation, counseling scientific societies and high-tech com- panies, and nuclear licensing. Dr. Meserve also served as an adviser to the President’s Science and Technology Advisor from 1977-1981, and as a law clerk to Justice Harry A. Blackmun of the United States Supreme Court and Judge Benjamin Kaplan of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. Among other affiliations, he is a member of the American Philosophical So- ciety and an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the American Physical Society. He has served as chairman or a member of numerous committees of the National Academies, including the Committee on Science, Technology and Law, the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems, the Board on Radioactive Waste Management, and the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board. He also was chair of the Committee on Upgrading Russian Capabilities for Controlling Highly Enriched Uranium and Plutonium. He received his bachelor’s degree from Tufts University in 1966, a law degree from Harvard in 1975, and his Ph.D. degree in applied physics from Stanford in 1976. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2003. 109

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110 APPENDIX B Nikolay P. Laverov (Russian Chair) is vice president of the Russian Acad- emy of Sciences (RAS) and former director of the Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry. He has worked in and with the USSR and Russian governments on a range of ecological problems, particularly nuclear waste disposal, and has been a leader in radiogeological studies aimed at using the protective properties of the geo- logical environment to prevent pollution of the ecosphere by radionuclides. In addition to his research activities, Dr. Laverov has held a variety of prominent positions in scientific administration and government, including chief of the Scientific Research Organizations Administration of the USSR Ministry of Geology (1972-1983), pro-rector of the Academy of the Na- tional Economy (1983-1987), president of the Kyrgyzstan Academy of Sci- ences (1987-1989), and USSR deputy prime minister and chairman of the USSR State Committee for Science and Technology (1989-1991). In 1989, Dr. Laverov was elected vice president of the USSR Academy of Sciences, a post to which he was subsequently re-elected in the RAS. In 1992, he was named co-chair of the Earth Science Joint Working Group, which is under the auspices of the U.S.-Russian Space Agreement. He is also a member of the Council on Science and Technology under the President of the Rus- sian Federation. Dr. Laverov graduated from the M.I. Kalinin Nonferrous Metals and Gold Institute in Moscow in 1954 and earned a doctorate in geological-mineralogical sciences in 1958. A full member (academician) of the RAS since 1987, he has authored or co-authored more than 250 publi- cations including 20 books and has served as editor-in-chief of the journal Geology of Ore Deposits since 1989. Vladmir Asmolov is first deputy director general-director for scientific-tech- nical policy of Energoatom Concern OJSC. Prior to this position, he served as deputy director general-director for science and engineering of FSUE Concern Rosenergoatom. He has also served as director of the Kurchatov Institute, and from 2003-2004, he served as deputy minister of atomic energy of the Russian Federation. In addition, Dr. Asmolov is currently serving as representative of the Russian Federation to the Organization for Economic Cooperation (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI); as a professor at Moscow Power Engineering Institute (Technical University); as chairman of the Sci- entific and Technical Panel of Rosatom (Federal Agency of Atomic Energy, formerly Minatom); as chairman of the scientific and technical panel of Concern Rosenergoatom; and as a member of the International Nuclear Safety Group (INSAG). He has received a certificate of appreciation from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Order of Courage from the President of the Russian Federation, and the Order of Honour from the President of the Russian Federation. He received a master’s degree from

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111 APPENDIX B the Moscow Power-Engineering Institute and a Ph.D. from the Kurchatov Institute. David J. Diamond is chief scientist in the Nuclear Science and Technology Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. He is also acting leader of the Nuclear Analysis Group. He has extensive experience in nuclear reactor safety, primarily through his work for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). He has also worked on safety issues with regula- tory bodies in more than a half dozen countries as well as the International Atomic Energy Agency. His technical contributions are through the applica- tion of neutronics and thermal-hydraulics models, and the combining of de- terministic and statistical analyses. The applications have been to problems in light and heavy water power and non-power reactors. For research and test reactors (RTRs) he has led a team providing support in reactor analysis and other disciplines for the research reactor at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research. The team also provides support to the USNRC staff responsible for RTR licensing. An example of the latter work has been the review of the safety reports for conversion (HEU to LEU fuel) of the USNRC-licensed university reactors. Dr. Diamond has been asked to chair various international panels address- ing safety issues. Dr. Diamond received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and he is a fellow of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) and a recipient of the ANS’ Tommy Thompson Award recognizing contributions to nuclear installation safety. Valentin B. Ivanov is chief research scientist at the RAS Institute of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry. He graduated from the Samara Technical University with a degree in electrical engineering and received his doctorate of technical sciences in Moscow from Institute of Radiation Techniques in 1991. His sphere of professional interests includes the nuclear fuel cycle and spent nuclear fuel management. From 1963 to 1998, he worked at Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR), for the last nine of those years serving as its director general. From 1998 to 2002, he served as first deputy minister for atomic energy of the Russian Federa- tion. In 2003, he was elected to the Russian State Duma, where he served as a member of the parliamentary Committee on Energy, Transport, and Communication until 2008. Boris F. Myasoedov is deputy secretary general for science of the Rus- sian Academy of Sciences (RAS), head of laboratories at both the RAS Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry and the RAS Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry. His scientific activity covers such fields as the fundamental chemistry of actinides, fuel

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112 APPENDIX B reprocessing, partitioning of radioactive waste, and environmental protec- tion. He has authored more than 500 publications and serves as editor of the journals Problems of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry. Acade- mician Myasoedov graduated from D.I. Mendeleev Chemical-Technology Institute in Moscow in 1954 and earned a Ph.D. in radiochemistry from the Vernadsky Institute in 1965 and his full doctorate in 1975 from the same institute. He was elected to the Russian Academy of Sciences in 1994 and has been awarded two State Prizes for his research on the chemistry of transplutonium elements (1986 and 2001), the Khlopin Prize for his studies of the chemistry of protactinium (1974), and the Ipatiev Prize of the RAS Presidium in 2003. James L. Snelgrove retired from Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as senior physicist in February 2007. During his first 10 years, he worked in the areas of fast reactor critical experiments and test reactor analysis and design. He worked on the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program from its inception in 1978 until he retired, mainly in the areas of high-density fuel and Mo-99 target development and testing. He led the fuel development and testing effort from late 1981 until mid-2004 and coordinated the program’s collaboration on fuel develop- ment with the Russian RERTR program from 1996 until his retirement. From 2005 through 2008, he coordinated the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) effort to produce a document on “Good Practices for Qualification of High Density LEU Research Reactor Fuels,” which was published as a Nuclear Energy Series document in 2009. Since late 2009, he has been coordinating preparation of another IAEA document on the properties of uranium molybdenum alloy research reactor fuels. Currently he works part time at ANL for the RERTR program as a senior advisor for research reactor fuels, and he occasionally consults with agencies and com- panies around the world in the area of research reactor fuel development and qualification. Dr. Snelgrove received his B.S. in physics from Tennessee Technological University in 1964 and his M.S. in physics in 1966 and Ph.D. in experimental nuclear physics in 1968 from Michigan State University. Anatoly Zrodnikov is scientific leader of the State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation, the Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) in Obninsk (since 2010), IPPE director general (1996-2010), and head of Department of National Research Nuclear University “Moscow Engineering & Physics Institute” (since 2005). He joined the IPPE in 1969 after graduation from the Moscow Power Engineering Institute (Techni- cal University) with an M.S. in applied physics, and he received his Ph.D. in nuclear engineering in 1975 and his D.Sc. in physics and mathematics in 1994. His scientific interests are in the areas of neutronics, thermal

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113 APPENDIX B and plasma physics, direct energy conversion, perturbation theory, nuclear power engineering including the space one, fast neutron reactors, and nuclear pumped lasers. Dr. Zrodnikov was the president of the Russian Nuclear Society in 2001-2003, a member of the Government Committee of the Russian Federation on Science and Innovation Policy (2003-2005), chairman of the Obninsk City Scientific and Technical Council (since 1996), and president of the Kaluga Regional Scientific Center. Also he is a mem- ber of editorial boards of scientific journals, including Laser and Particle Beams, Atomic Energy, and Nuclear Power Engineering, and he is author and co-author of more than 300 scientific publications. He holds the title of Honored Scientist of the Russian Federation and was awarded an Order of Honor of the Russian Federation, and Honorary Citizen of Kaluga region. Committee Consultant Robert A. Bari is a senior physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory. He has been involved in the design and safety assessments of complex, high-technology facilities since he joined the applied programs at the Laboratory in 1974. He has worked on projects and issues regarding nuclear safety and nonproliferation technologies, nuclear waste management, development of advanced nuclear reactors, and other related technologies. During the 1980s, at the request of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), Dr. Bari created and led a team of experts in the area of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This team expanded PRA methodologies in areas of importance to safety of nuclear power plants. In addition to his work for the USNRC, Dr. Bari led a four-laboratory team in a year-long evaluation of the impact of fuel enrichment on the performance of the Advanced Neutron Source, formerly planned for operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. His current research involves energy resources, national security, and reliability of the national electrical grid. Dr. Bari has lectured internationally on risk as- sessment and nuclear safety and has authored more than 100 papers and key reports in these areas. Dr. Bari earned an A.B. in physics in 1965 from Rutgers University and a Ph.D. from Brandeis University in 1970. Staff Yuri Shiyan is the director of the Russian Academy of Sciences Office for North American Scientific Cooperation. He has worked in this capacity for more than 25 years, facilitating collaborative efforts and exchanges between international partners and Soviet/Russian scientists, engineers, and medi- cal professionals. In 2004-2005, he served as IAEA expert for the Nuclear Fuel Subcommittee, and since 1981 he has served as the coordinator of

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114 APPENDIX B the Russian Academy of Sciences Committee on International Security and Arms Control. For the past four years, he has served as coordinator of the RAS-NAS Committees on Counterterrorism and Non-Proliferation. Further, he has assisted in several joint U.S.–Russian projects focusing on various aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle, including the storage of nuclear spent fuel. His knowledge of English and professional experience gained through assignments at several international posts have contributed to his success as an international scientific liaison. Sarah Case (Study Director) is currently senior program officer in the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board of the National Research Council, where she has worked since 2007. She currently manages a portfolio of consensus studies and workshops focused on technical issues related to nuclear security and non-proliferation. Previous projects have focused on nuclear security but have also addressed issues related to nuclear energy, electrical transmission and distribution, and the health effects of radiation. Dr. Case received her Ph.D. in physics from the University of Chicago and her A.B. in physics from Columbia University. Kevin D. Crowley is senior board director of the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board (NRSB) at the National Research Council–National Acad- emy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. He is responsible for managing the NRSB’s work on nuclear safety and security, radioactive-waste management and environmental cleanup, and radiation health effects. He is also the principal investigator for a long-standing cooperative agreement between the National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. Department of Energy to provide scientific support for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima, Japan. Dr. Crowley’s professional interests and activities focus on safety, security, and technical efficacy of nuclear and radiation-based technologies. He has directed more than 20 National Research Council studies on these and other topics, including Safety and Security of Commer- cial Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage (2004, 2006); Going the Distance? The Safe Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in the United States (2006); Medical Isotope Production without Highly Enriched Uranium (2009); America’s Energy Future: Technology and Transformation (2009); and Analysis of Cancer Risks in Populations near Nuclear Facili- ties (in progress). Before joining the National Academies staff in 1993, Dr. Crowley held teaching/research positions at Miami University of Ohio, the University of Oklahoma, and the U.S. Geological Survey. He holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, both in geology, from Princeton University.