Appendix B


Speaker Biographies

Rachel Ballard-Barbash, MD, MPH, serves as the associate director of the Applied Research Program in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The program’s mission is to understand how and why cancer care and control activities in the United States influence patterns of care and trends in cancer burden through evaluation of patterns and trends in cancer-associated health behaviors and risk factors, health care services, economics, and outcomes, including patient-reported outcomes. Her own research focuses in the areas of physical activity, diet, and weight at the individual, population, and policy level, and quality of cancer care in the area of screening and treatment. She has also focused on improving methods and systems for tracking cancer preventive measures in national and local populations, and on examining the delivery of health care utilization and services in screening and treatment.

Dr. Ballard-Barbash received her MD from the University of Michigan in 1981 and her MPH in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota in 1985. She trained in internal medicine at Northwestern University, and in preventive medicine and clinical nutrition at the Mayo Clinic. Following her training, Dr. Ballard-Barbash developed a clinical nutrition care program within a multi-specialty clinic prior to joining NCI in 1987 as a staff fellow. Before her present position at NCI, she served as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services nutrition policy advisor in the



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Appendix B Speaker Biographies Rachel Ballard-Barbash, MD, MPH, serves as the associate director of the Applied Research Program in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The program’s mission is to understand how and why cancer care and control activities in the United States influence patterns of care and trends in cancer burden through evaluation of patterns and trends in cancer-associated health behav- iors and risk factors, health care services, economics, and outcomes, includ- ing patient-reported outcomes. Her own research focuses in the areas of physical activity, diet, and weight at the individual, population, and policy level, and quality of cancer care in the area of screening and treatment. She has also focused on improving methods and systems for tracking cancer pre- ventive measures in national and local populations, and on examining the delivery of health care utilization and services in screening and treatment. Dr. Ballard-Barbash received her MD from the University of Michi- gan in 1981 and her MPH in epidemiology from the University of Min- nesota in 1985. She trained in internal medicine at Northwestern Univer - sity, and in preventive medicine and clinical nutrition at the Mayo Clinic. Following her training, Dr. Ballard-Barbash developed a clinical nutrition care program within a multi-specialty clinic prior to joining NCI in 1987 as a staff fellow. Before her present position at NCI, she served as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services nutrition policy advisor in the 91

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92 THE ROLE OF OBESITY IN CANCER Assistant Secretary’s Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in 1990 and 1991 before returning to NCI. She has published widely in the areas of diet, physical activity, weight, and cancer risk and prognosis, and in the areas of cancer control surveil- lance and breast cancer screening and treatment within clinical care. She is an author and co-author of more than 180 peer-reviewed publications and 7 invited book chapters. In addition to her research, she has participated in the development and review of both general population and cancer-specific reviews and guidelines related to diet, physical activity, and weight at the national and international level. She was the NCI program director for the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium from 1995 to 2005, and has served as the NCI director of the International Cancer Screening Network since 1995. She directs the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle Study of Breast Cancer Prognosis. She leads an NCI effort to advance research on the com- bined effects of diet, physical activity, and weight on cancer, serves on the Senior Leadership Group for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Obe- sity Research Task Force, and advances NIH’s research in the NIH/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research to advance research that identifies population-level solutions to the childhood obesity epidemic. Nathan A. Berger, MD, is the Hanna-Payne Professor of Experimental Medicine and director of Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) Center for Science, Health and Society. He is the 2007 recipient of the Frank and Dorothy Humel Hovorka Prize for exceptional achievements in teaching, research, and scholarly service that have benefited the community, nation, and world. In 2010 he was recognized as the CWRU Honorary Alumnus of the Year and in 2011 he was awarded a CWRU Distinguished University Professorship. In addition, he is an inductee into the Cleveland Medical Hall of Fame and a recipient of the Cancer Hall of Fame’s Research Award from the American Cancer Society. He is professor of medicine, biochemistry, genetics, and oncology at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Berger is an active clinician and researcher. He leads two major interdisciplinary research ini- tiatives funded by the National Institutes of Health, one focused on aging and cancer, the other on energetics and cancer. He is also co–principal investigator of the CWRU Specialized Program of Research Excellence in gastrointestinal cancer and the CWRU Barrett’s Esophagus Translational Research Network Program. Berger is the author of more than 160 papers,

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93 APPENDIX C reviews, and book chapters on poly (ADP-Ribose), DNA damage and repair, developmental therapeutics, aging and cancer, and energy balance and cancer. He is editor for the book series Energy Balance and Cancer. He served as chief of the hematology/oncology division, then director of the Cancer Research Center for 10 years and dean of the Case School of Medicine for 7. Berger attended Temple University, Hahnemann Medical School and served fellowships in hematology/oncology at Washington University School of Medicine and in molecular biology at the NIH Gerontology Research Center. He was a faculty member at Washington University in St. Louis before moving to CWRU. Dean E. Brenner, MD, is a clinical oncologist and clinical pharmacologist who played a pivotal role in the development and growth of the Cancer Prevention and Control at the University of Michigan. Dr. Brenner’s research is focused upon the clinical pharmacology of cancer risk reductive interventions (“chemoprevention”). He has developed new ways to under- stand pharmacology of natural or synthetic compounds to delay, reverse or prevent the development of invasive cancer. Therapeutic index, the risk benefit ratio, represents a key barrier in the development and deployment of cancer risk reductive interventions. Dr. Brenner’s group has focused on defining the efficacy and toxicity of the polyphenol class of nutritional extracts, curcumin, resveratrol, and gingerols through their action upon the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase systems that regulate inflammation. He has developed new ways of identifying and validating biomarkers that may be used for assessment of cancer risk reduction efficacy and early cancer detection. Dr. Brenner’s work has spanned the spectrum of translational research in cancer prevention. He serves as principal investigator of a multicenter, international consortium, the Great Lakes/New England Clinical Epide- miology and Validation Center of the Early Detection Research Network. This National Cancer Institute–funded cooperative network focuses on the discovery and validation of new surrogate endpoint biomarkers for early diagnosis of carcinogenesis in humans. A gastrointestinal Specialized Pro- gram of Research Excellence for translation of bench to bedside and back to bench research in pancreatic and colon cancers has been funded with Dr. Brenner as principal investigator. Dr. Brenner has served as a charter member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s (ASCO’s) Cancer Prevention Committee from 2002

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94 THE ROLE OF OBESITY IN CANCER to 2006. He was reappointed as chair of the Cancer Prevention Committee in 2009 and is currently the past chair of the Cancer Prevention Commit- tee. Dr. Brenner chaired ASCO’s Annual Meeting Program Committee Cancer Prevention Track in 2010. Dr. Brenner also serves as a member of the American Association for Cancer Research’s Annual Meeting Education Committee. Angela Hartley Brodie, PhD, is professor of pharmacology and experi- mental therapeutics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and an internationally recognized researcher at the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center. Dr. Brodie is renowned for her groundbreaking work in the development of aromatase inhibitors used in the treatment of breast cancer. Among her many awards are the prestigious Charles F. Kettering Prize from the General Motors Cancer Research Awards in 2005, and the Dorothy P. Landon-American Association for Cancer Research Prize for Translational Cancer Research in 2006, which recognizes “seminal con- tributions to our understanding of cancer through basic and translational research.” Aromatase inhibitors help to prevent recurrence of breast cancer in postmenopausal women by reducing the level of estrogen in the body, thereby cutting off the fuel that promotes the growth of cancer cells. Dr. Brodie began developing this novel approach of targeting the enzyme aromatase to inhibit the synthesis of estrogen in the early 1970s, initially working with her husband, Harry Brodie, PhD, a chemist. She went on to develop formestane, the first aromatase inhibitor to be used to treat breast cancer patients. Released for worldwide use in 1994, it was the first new agent in a decade designed to treat breast cancer. Her work paved the way for the development of other aromatase inhibitors, which are now pre- scribed for women around the world. Dr. Brodie has expanded her research into prostate cancer and is now developing steroidal compounds that target key enzymes in the produc- tion of androgens, or male hormones, which play a role in recurrence of the cancer. She has received numerous other awards, including the Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction from the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation in 2000, and has published nearly 200 papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals.

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95 APPENDIX C Kerry S. Courneya, PhD, is director of the Behavioral Medicine Labora- tory, professor, and Canada Research Chair in the faculty of physical edu- cation and recreation at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. He received his BA (1987) and MA (1989) in physical education from the University of Western Ontario (London, Canada) and his PhD (1992) in kinesiology from the University of Illinois. After spending 5 years as an assistant/associate professor at the University of Calgary, he accepted a posi- tion at the University of Alberta in 1997. Dr. Courneya’s research program focuses on physical activity and can- cer including topics such as primary prevention, coping with treatments, recovery after treatments, long-term survivorship, and disease recurrence and survival. His research interests include both the outcomes and deter- minants of physical activity as well as behavior change interventions. Dr. Courneya is study co-chair for the Colon Health and Life-Long Exercise Change trial designed to determine the effects of exercise on disease-free survival in colon cancer survivors across Canada and Australia. He is also team co-leader for the Alberta Moving Beyond Breast Cancer Cohort Study designed to determine the associations between physical activity, health- related fitness, and disease outcomes in newly diagnosed Alberta breast cancer survivors. He has co-authored the American Cancer Society’s physical activity and nutrition guidelines and the American College of Sports Medicine’s exercise guidelines for cancer survivors. He was the guest editor for a special issue on Physical Activity in Cancer Survivors in Psycho-Oncology in 2009 and was lead editor for a special volume on Physical Activity and Cancer in the book series Recent Results in Cancer Research (2011). Andrew J. Dannenberg, MD, the Henry R. Erle, MD–Roberts Family Professor of Medicine, is director of the Weill Cornell Cancer Center. Dr. Dannenberg received his medical degree from Washington University in St. Louis and served as a medical resident and gastroenterology fellow at The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. His laboratory is focused on elucidating the mechanisms underlying the inflammation-cancer con- nection with an emphasis on prostaglandin biology. Dr. Dannenberg has authored more than 150 scientific articles, as well as edited several books and journals. He is a member of the Association of American Physicians, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). He previously chaired the Program Commit-

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96 THE ROLE OF OBESITY IN CANCER tee of the AACR “Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research” meeting and serves on the editorial boards of several journals, including Cancer Preven- tion Research, Clinical Cancer Research, and Journal of Clinical Oncology. Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, PhD, RD, is professor and Webb Endowed Chair of nutrition sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), as well as the associate director for cancer prevention and control at UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Demark-Wahnefried is a nutrition scientist with training in biochemistry, genetics, and behavioral science. For the past two decades, her research career has spanned basic sci- ence studies focused on determining mechanisms of action of food-related components on neoplastic progression, to clinical research that involves nutrition-related concerns of cancer patients, as well as determining effec- tive lifestyle interventions that improve the overall health of cancer survivors and populations at high risk for cancer (relatives of cancer survivors, rural African Americans residing in high incidence counties, etc.). Her laboratory has conducted some of the largest studies exploring metabolic and body composition changes in response to cancer treatment. An area of research in which Dr. Demark-Wahnefried has experienced particular success is in the delivery of home-based lifestyle interventions among cancer survivors, where she has led and continues to lead a number of National Institutes of Health-funded trials aimed at improving the diet and exercise behavior of cancer survivors. She was a named a Komen Professor of Survivorship for her work in this arena. In addition to her research, Dr. Demark-Wahnefried also serves on several committees, including the American Cancer Soci- ety’s Guidelines Panel for Nutrition and Physical Activity among Cancer Survivors, the World Cancer Research Fund, and the American College of Sports Medicine Guidelines Panel for Physical Activity in Cancer Survivors, and the American Society of Clinical Oncology Committee on Cancer Survivorship. John DiGiovanni, PhD, is professor of pharmacology and toxicology at the University of Texas at Austin. Research in his laboratory has focused for many years on understanding how cancer develops and on the identification of novel targets, mechanisms, and strategies for cancer prevention. Several major research projects are ongoing in the DiGiovanni labo- ratory. One major research area focuses on identifying specific cellular signaling pathways that are disrupted during tumor development and progression. Signaling pathways currently under study include the PI3K/

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97 APPENDIX C Akt/mTOR pathway and Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcrip- tion (STATs), especially STATs 1, 3, and 5. Other areas of research involve studies aimed at identifying the target cells (i.e., stem/progenitor cells) for tumor development and identifying genes that confer susceptibility to environmentally-induced cancer. These studies have used genetic crosses between sensitive and resistant mice to map genes involved in the pro- motion of skin tumors in mice. These studies also incorporate the novel approach of using “genetical genomics” to help identify novel genes, path- ways, and networks involved in cancer susceptibility. A major new research direction in the DiGiovanni laboratory focuses on the impact of obesity on cancer development and progression, includ- ing obesity that occurs early in life. His lab is currently studying the impact of obesity on cellular signaling pathways in several tissues in relation to its effects on cancer development. The overall goal of this research is to identify molecular targets and strategies to offset the increased cancer risk and mortality associated with obesity. Cancers currently under study in the laboratory include both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers, prostate cancer, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and lymphoma. Diana Dyer, MS, RD, has a 35-year career as a registered dietitian (RD) spanning the health care spectrum, from an early specialty in critical care nutrition to tirelessly advocating for the inclusion of nutrition as an auto- matic and pro-active component of comprehensive cancer care, both dur- ing therapy and survivorship. A multiple-time cancer survivor herself, she wrote the highly regarded book A Dietitian’s Cancer Story, which has been reprinted 13 times since first published in 1997. Ms. Dyer also developed the website CancerRD.com in 1998, one of the first RDs to have her own website. The Michigan Dietetic Association honored her in 1998 with its Individual Public Relations Award and again in 2000 as Michigan’s Dietitian of the Year. After serving on the American Dietetic Association’s (ADA’s) Oncology Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group (ON DPG) Executive Board for many years, initiating the discussions that led to the development of both Standards of Practice/Standards of Professional Performance and the Specialty Certification in Oncology Nutrition, and founding ON DPG’s Survivorship Subunit, ON DPG honored Ms. Dyer with its Distinguished Practice Award in 2005. In 2009, she moved even farther along the health care spectrum to begin her “encore career” as a Dietitian-Farmer. Ms. Dyer and her husband finally returned to their first dream, at last becoming new farmers, starting The Dyer Family Organic Farm near Ann Arbor, MI,

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98 THE ROLE OF OBESITY IN CANCER growing 40+ varieties of organic garlic. Their mission is “shaping our future from the ground up.” To further her mission of shaping the future, Ms. Dyer wrote the School to Farm Program for ADA’s Hunger and Environmental Nutrition DPG and hopes that it will help to shape the future of dietetic students and interns by providing volunteer opportunities for them to experience and appreciate the role, challenges, and multiple benefits of sustainable agriculture and locally grown foods within a secure and sustainable food system. The Hunger and Environmental Nutrition DPG selected Ms. Dyer to receive their Excellence Award in 2010. She has been a regularly invited speaker by cancer survivor and health professional groups throughout the country since 1997 but currently enjoys speaking less and spending more time growing, cooking with, and selling 40+ varieties of organic garlic at three local farmers’ markets, having dietitians and dietetic students come to visit or work on her farm, and writing for her three blogs (dianadyer. com, 365DaysofKale.com, and cancervictorygardens.com). Ms. Dyer was honored to be included in the group of 10 RDs “who are making a differ- ence,” selected by Today’s Dietitian Magazine in 2011. Dr. Patricia Ganz, MD, a medical oncologist, received her BA magna cum laude from Radcliffe College (Harvard University) in 1969 and her MD from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in 1973. She com- pleted her training in internal medicine and hematology/oncology at UCLA Medical Center from 1973 to 1978, where she also served as chief resident in medicine. She has been a member of the faculty of the UCLA School of Medicine since 1978 and the UCLA School of Public Health since 1992. Since 1993 she has been the director of the Division of Cancer Preven- tion and Control Research at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. In 1999 she was awarded an American Cancer Society Clinical Research Professorship for “Enhancing Patient Outcomes Across the Cancer Control Continuum,” and in 1999 and 2000 received the Susan G. Komen Founda- tion Professor of Survivorship Award. Dr. Ganz was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2007, and in 2010 received the American Cancer Society Medal of Honor. She served on the National Cancer Institute Board of Scientific Advisors from 2002 to 2007 and on the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Board of Directors from 2003 to 2006. She currently serves as the ASCO representative to the National Cancer Policy Forum of the IOM. Dr. Ganz is a pioneer in the assessment of quality of life in cancer

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99 APPENDIX C patients and survivors, and is active in clinical trials research with the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project. She has focused much of her clinical and research efforts in the areas of breast cancer and its prevention, and was a member of the National Cancer Institute Progress Review Group on Breast Cancer. At the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, she directs the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control Research, and leads the scientific program focused on patients and survivors. In 1997 she established the UCLA Family Cancer Registry and Genetic Evaluation Program, which serves patients and survivors, as well as those at high risk for familial/hereditary cancers. Her other major areas of research include cancer survivorship and late effects of cancer treatment, cancer in the elderly, and quality of care for cancer patients. She served on the IOM committee responsible for the 2005 report From Cancer Patient to Survivor: Lost in Transition and on the 2008 IOM committee for the report Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs. Dr. Ganz is an associate editor for the Journal of the National Cancer Institute and CA-A Journal for Clinician, and is on the editorial board of the Journal of Cancer Survivorship. She was a founding member of the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship in 1986, and has directed the UCLA-LIVESTRONG Survivorship Center of Excellence at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center since 2006. Susan M. Gapstur, PhD, MPH, is vice president of epidemiology at the American Cancer Society. She received her MPH and PhD in epidemiol- ogy from the University of Minnesota. She began her academic career as an assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago in 1994. She subsequently was promoted to associate and then full professor, and also assumed the role of associate director of cancer preven- tion and control at the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University. Dr. Gapstur joined the American Cancer Society in February 2009. As vice president of the Epidemiology Research Program, she oversees all research related activities for this program of 35 investigators and staff. She is the principal investigator of the Cancer Prevention Study II, one of the largest prospective cohort studies in the world. Dr. Gapstur’s research focuses on identifying cancer risk factors, with a particular emphasis on the role of hormone (both endogenous and exog- enous) and lifestyle factors such as alcohol consumption on risk of breast cancer in women, prostate cancer in men and pancreatic cancer in both. For example, based on data from a large prospective study of postmenopausal

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100 THE ROLE OF OBESITY IN CANCER women, she reported differences in associations of hormone replacement therapy with specific breast cancer histologic subtypes—that study was published in JAMA in 1999. Using data from another large cohort study, Dr. Gapstur showed that post-load plasma glucose levels were significantly associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (JAMA, 2000). These findings support the hypothesis that abnormal glucose metabolism is not just a consequence of pancreatic cancer but is also a cause of the disease. Dr. Gapstur has served on several national and international com- mittees including the National Institutes of Health, Center for Scientific Review, Epidemiology of Cancer peer review committee, the National Cancer Institute Subcommittee A (Cancer Center Support Grants), and the International Agency on Cancer Working Group Monograph Volume 96 “Alcoholic Beverage Consumption, Acetaldehyde and Urethane.” She is a senior editor of the scientific journal Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. Pamela J. Goodwin, MD, MSc, FRCP, has been actively involved in research relating to breast cancer for the past 20 years. Early in her career, she became intrigued with the possibility that lifestyle, especially obesity, might impact outcomes of women diagnosed with breast cancer. She began a program of research that focused on the role of lifestyle factors, including nutrition, exercise, and related factors in the clinical course of breast cancer. She has led a number of studies that investigate the complex interactions between body size, nutrition, exercise, and physiologic mediators such as insulin, IGF-I, and vitamin D, examining the impact of these factors on survival of women diagnosed with breast cancer. She has also led a mul- ticenter randomized trial that demonstrated that participation in support groups helped women who were psychologically distressed by their breast cancer cope with their cancer; however, support groups did not influence survival. More recently, Dr. Goodwin has begun investigating the status of long-term breast cancer survivors and the influences of hereditary factors and vitamin D on breast cancer outcomes. Dr. Goodwin is a professor of medicine at the University of Toronto, with cross appointments in the Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation and in the School of Graduate Studies. She is a Scientist in the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital, Director of the hospital’s Marvelle Koffler Breast Centre and holder of the Marvelle Koffler Chair in Breast Research.

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101 APPENDIX C Stephen D. Hursting, PhD, MPH, is professor and chair of the Depart- ment of Nutritional Sciences, as well as the Margaret McKean-Love Chair of Nutritional, Molecular and Cellular Sciences, at the University of Texas (UT) at Austin. He is also professor of carcinogenesis at the UT-MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Hursting earned his PhD in nutritional biochemistry and MPH in nutritional epidemiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and he completed postdoctoral training in molecular carcinogenesis and cancer prevention as a Cancer Prevention Fellow at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Prior to joining the Uni- versity of Texas faculty, Dr. Hursting was chief of the NCI’s Nutrition and Molecular Carcinogenesis Laboratory Section and deputy director of the NCI’s Office of Preventive Oncology (1999-2005). Dr. Hursting’s research interests center on diet–gene interactions relevant to cancer prevention, particularly the molecular and hormonal mechanisms underlying energy balance–breast cancer associations. His research program, which has resulted in more than 125 peer-reviewed publications, focuses on three interrelated areas: (1) mechanism-based nutrition and cancer prevention studies in genetically engineered mice; (2) molecular and metabolic mechanisms underlying the energy balance and carcinogenesis relationship, with a particular interest in the roles of the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways and inflammatory pathways in breast and pancreatic cancers; and (3) translational nutrition and chemo- prevention studies linking preclinical research with complementary clinical or epidemiologic studies. Madhuri Kakarala, MD, PhD, is a medical oncologist who practices breast medical oncology with a specific interest in those at high risk for male or female breast cancer at the University of Michigan. She is also a nutrition scientist with a doctorate in human nutrition from Michigan State University and clinical dietetics training and practice experience. Her research focuses on translational investigation of nutritional and pharma- ceutical interventions for cancer risk reduction. Her lab is investigating stem cells and signaling pathways regulating their self renewal and differentia- tion such as Wnt, Notch, and Hedgehog as targets for cancer risk reductive interventions or biomarkers for cancer risk reduction intervention efficacy assessment in early phase human clinical trials. Additionally, her lab is inves- tigating stem cell signaling changes and epigenetic alterations and markers as potential novel biomarkers for cancer early detection. Dr. Kakarala’s lab is also studying the pharmacokinetics of natural

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102 THE ROLE OF OBESITY IN CANCER products and drugs for cancer risk reduction in human Phase I clinical trials. She is investigating mechanistic effects of natural compounds and select drugs on stem cells and other biomarkers involved in carcinogenesis. She is, then, translating the discoveries in lab into efficacy human Phase IIa trials to determine if these compounds could be effective risk reduction interventions in patients at high risk for breast (e.g., BRCA1 or 2 mutation carriers or high-risk ductal carcinoma in situ) and colon cancer (individuals with high risk polyps). Dr. Kakarala has funding from the National Cancer Institute, Susan G. Komen Foundation, and the Department of Veterans Affairs for this area of research. Derek LeRoith, MD, PhD, FACP, an endocrinologist and diabetologist, is director of research of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Bone Diseases at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. Prior to join- ing Mount Sinai’s faculty in 2005, Dr. LeRoith was chief of the Diabetes Branch at the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. This is the largest program devoted to the study of diabetes within the intramural program of the National Institutes of Health. He received his medical education in Cape Town, South Africa, and has been on the faculty of the University of Cincinnati where he supervised the diabetes teaching and clinical programs. He has interests in research in diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes. Dr. LeRoith has served on the national board of the American Diabetes Association and presently serves on the board of the Endocrine Fellows Foundation. He is an editor of Reviews in Endocrine & Metabolic Disorders and a textbook on diabetes. He has published more than 500 original research papers, reviews, and editorials, and edited a number of books on diabetes and IGF-related topics. Jennifer A. Ligibel, MD, is assistant professor in the department of medi- cine at Harvard Medical School, and attending physician, adult oncology, at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI). Dr. Ligibel received her MD from Washington University in St. Louis. Later she completed a residency in internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, followed by a medical oncology fellowship at DFCI. In 2001, she joined the Women’s Cancer Program at DFCI, specializing in the care of women with breast cancer. Dr. Ligibel’s research focuses on energy balance and cancer. She has conducted projects studying the impact of

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103 APPENDIX C physical activity on biomarkers linked to breast cancer risk and progression, quality of life in women undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy, and functional status in women with advanced breast cancer. Ongoing projects look at the impact of physical activity upon tissue-based biomarkers in women with newly diagnosed breast cancer and on serum biomarkers in survivors of colon and rectal cancer. Anne McTiernan, MD, PhD, is a member of the Epidemiology Program at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, where she is direc- tor of the Prevention Center. She is also research professor at the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine depart- ment of epidemiology, and School of Medicine division of geriatrics. Dr. McTiernan’s research focuses on identifying ways to prevent new or recur- rent cancer with a particular emphasis on weight control, physical activity, and chemoprevention. She was principal investigator of the Seattle TREC Center investigating mechanisms of energy balance and cancer prevention, in which she led over 25 scientists in transdisciplinary research to elucidate the pathways linking components of energy balance to the cancer process. Dr. McTiernan is principal investigator of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that tested the independent and combined effects of two lifestyle interventions in postmenopausal women: (1) a reduced-calorie diet with goal 10 percent weight loss and (2) a moderate-intensity aerobic exercise program. She is also principal investigator of an RCT testing the effects of vitamin D on serum and tissue biomarkers of breast cancer risk in over- weight/obese postmenopausal women undergoing a 12-month weight loss program. She is principal investigator of the Seattle site of Health, Eating, Activ- ity, and Lifestyle Study, which is assessing associations of anthropometrics, fat mass, sex and metabolic hormones, inflammation, vitamin D, diet, and physical activity with prognosis in breast cancer survivors. She is also prin- cipal investigator of the Seattle site of the ExCel trial which tested the effect of exemestane, an aromatase inhibitor, on breast cancer prevention, and she led an RCT testing aspirin effect on breast cancer biomarkers. Previously she conducted an RCT of a 1-year aerobic exercise inter- vention in postmenopausal women to assess the effect of exercise on endogenous sex hormones. She was also principal investigator of an RCT to test the effect of a 1-year aerobic exercise intervention on colorectal cell proliferation, apoptosis, and prostaglandin content, and on other biomark- ers of colon cancer risk in men and women. Dr. McTiernan was previously

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104 THE ROLE OF OBESITY IN CANCER a co–project director in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Clinical Coordinating Center and continues to collaborate with WHI efforts. Dr. McTiernan has published more than 250 manuscripts in peer- reviewed medical and scientific journals, and has edited two scientific volumes focused on energy balance, obesity, physical activity, and cancer. Jeffrey Meyerhardt, MD, MPH, is a gastrointestinal oncologist at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and an assistant professor of medi- cine at Harvard Medical School. His research focus is on diet and lifestyle studies in patients with colorectal cancer. Dr. Meyerhardt concentrates on outcomes research among patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. Dr. Meyerhardt received his MD from Yale School of Medicine in 1997. He completed a residency in internal medicine at Beth Israel Deacon- ness Medical Center in Boston, followed by a medical oncology fellowship at DFCI. He joined the Gastointestinal Cancer Center at DFCI in 2001 and became an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in 2010. Lori Minasian, MD, is chief of Community Oncology and Prevention Trials Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). She is a board-certified medical oncologist and is responsible for the management and oversight of the Community Clini- cal Oncology Program, a large NCI-sponsored community-based clinical trials network. Through this network, community oncologists participate in cancer clinical trials in treatment, prevention, and cancer control. The network sponsors the large breast and prostate cancer prevention trials, several smaller prevention trials in disease sites that include colon, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, and bladder cancer, as well as numerous symptom management and other cancer control clinical trials. Kate Murphy is a 29-year colorectal cancer survivor committed to provid- ing easily understood information for colorectal cancer patients and their families. As an advocate, she provides a voice for patients in many national settings. Knowledge, she says, can break the desperate cycle of helplessness and hopelessness. She currently serves as “listmom” on ACOR.org’s colon cancer discussion list and writes and edits Fight Colorectal Cancer’s popular Research News & Events Updates at www.FightColorectalCancer.org/news. As a research advocate, she sits on numerous patient advocate committees including the National Cancer Institute Gastrointestinal Steering Com-

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105 APPENDIX C mittee GI Steering Committee and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Colon, Rectal, Anal Panel, has been a mentor in American Asso- ciation for Cancer Research’s Scientist-Survivor program, and represents Fight Colorectal Cancer at meetings across the globe. Martin J. Murphy, Jr., PhD, DMedSc, is the founding chief executive offi- cer for the CEO Roundtable on Cancer, established in 2001 at the request of former President George H. W. Bush, and Chairman of the Board and chief executive officer for AlphaMed Consulting. Dr. Murphy brings four decades of health care and cancer research experience to his CEO Roundtable role through his extensive work as a peer-reviewed cancer scientist, professor of medicine, editor and oncology consultant. Dr. Murphy, a graduate of New York University, was awarded postdoctoral fellowships at the Institut de Pathologie Cellulaire (Paris, France), the Patterson Laboratories of the Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute (Manchester, UK), and the John Curtin School of Medi- cal Research, Australian National University (Canberra, Australia). He was on the faculty of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital (Memphis, TN), Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (New York, NY), and Wright State University School of Medicine (Dayton, OH). Dr. Murphy founded the Hipple Cancer Research Center in 1977 and led it for the next two decades as its chief executive officer. When he retired from Hipple, endeav- oring to advance both new discoveries and enhance improved global health care delivery, Dr. Murphy founded AlphaMed Consulting that provides support for comprehensive cancer centers as well as selected research- intensive pharmaceutical and biotech companies. Dr. Murphy is a director of Aldagen, a clinical-stage regenerative medi- cine company. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of Hatteras Venture Partners, a charter member of the Scientific Advisory Board of Pappas Ventures (2002 to 2008), and the primary biopharma consultant to Catellus, the developer of Mission Bay, the largest life science campus in San Francisco. He was the charter chairman of the Scientific Advisory Board of ALMAC Diagnostics (2000 to 2008), a founding member of Queen’s University School of Medicine International Review Board, chairman of The Conquer Cancer Foundation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, a founding director of the All-Ireland Cancer Foundation, and a director of the American Cancer Society Foundation (2000 to 2009). He is the convener of ACT-China (Advanced Clinical Trials, China). He is a director of the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, a member

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106 THE ROLE OF OBESITY IN CANCER of the Board of Visitors of the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, member of the Board of Advisors of the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, and a charter member and director of C-Change. Queen’s University School of Medicine (Belfast) conferred upon him the doctor of medical science degree. Linda Nebeling, PhD, MPH, RD, FADA, is the chief of the Health Behaviors Research Branch in the Behavioral Research Program (BRP), Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DCCPS), at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Dr. Nebeling is also the lead program director for the Transdisciplinary Research in Energetics and Cancer Centers initiative. She previously served as the acting associate director of the BRP, DCCPS. Prior to joining the DCCPS, she was a public health nutritionist and worked in the NCI’s National 5 A Day for Better Health Program, the largest public–private nutrition education program of its kind. She was awarded a post-doctoral appointment at the NCI’s Cancer Prevention Research Branch, in the NCI Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program. Dr. Nebeling has worked previously as a teaching assistant in the department of nutrition, Case Western Reserve University and a Clinical Dietitian at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Nebeling received her doctorate in nutrition from Case Western Reserve University. She has a master of public health degree from Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, and is a graduate of the Dietetic Internship Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Her research has focused on the relationship between dietary behaviors in different population groups, especially for fruit and vegetable consumption, and the risk of cancer and other chronic diseases. She has authored numerous peer-reviewed publications and is a reviewer for many professional journals. Dr. Nebeling is a member of the National Fruit and Vegetable Alliance, as part of the Produce for Better Health–Centers for Disease Control and Prevention “Fruits and Veggies—More Matters” Program. She has served as a member of the Research Advisory Board of the Produce for Better Health Foundation; on the executive board of the Oncology Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group in the American Dietetic Association; and on the editorial board of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association. She has received three NIH Merit Awards for exemplary contributions in the field of nutri- tion and health promotion. In 2001, she was awarded the status of Fellow of American Dietetic Association.

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107 APPENDIX C Edward E. Partridge, MD, is director of the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Comprehensive Cancer Center, a UAB gynecologist- oncologist and professor who helped to create a community of cancer caregivers in Alabama and to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities. Dr. Partridge’s efforts helped gain Alabama participation in the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, which allows women diag- nosed with an abnormal mammogram to receive treatment regardless of financial means. He has led the Alabama Black Belt Cancer Linkage Ini- tiative, which assures that men and women diagnosed with cancer in the Black Belt area would get state-of-the-art care, and he is a co-founder of the Alabama Partnership for Cancer Control in the Underserved. Currently, Dr. Partridge is principal investigator for the Deep South Network for Cancer Control, a community-based participatory research network, as well as a partnership involving the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center, Morehouse School of Medicine and Tuskegee University. The feder- ally supported network pairs research at UAB with investigators at histori- cally black colleges and universities, to enhance cancer disparity research. His longtime volunteer work with the American Cancer Society (ACS) included a major role in the establishment of the Joe Lee Griffin Hope Lodge, which provides housing in Birmingham for out-of-town patients receiving cancer treatment. He has served as chairman of the Mid-South Division of the ACS and currently president of the National Board of Directors for ACS. Dr. Partridge is a native of Demopolis, Alabama, and was educated there and at the University of Alabama, where he received a BS degree. He received his MD from the UAB School of Medicine in 1973. He completed residencies and a fellowship at UAB in obstetrics and gynecology. He also was an ACS clinical fellow. His entire career has been spent at UAB. He rose from instructor to hold the endowed Margaret Cameron Spain Chair in Obstetrics and Gyne- cology. He served for many years as director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology, and is now director of the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center. He also holds senior positions in the UAB Center for Aging and the UAB Gene Therapy Center. Elizabeth A. Platz, ScD, MPH, is a cancer epidemiologist with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, whose research on prostate and colon cancers sits at the interface between epidemiology and basic sci- ence. Within prospective cohorts, she studies the association of genetic and

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108 THE ROLE OF OBESITY IN CANCER epigenetic factors as well as circulating markers of androgenicity, inflam- mation, and oxidation with prostate cancer incidence and recurrence. For colorectal neoplasia, her work focuses on the metabolic syndrome, growth factors, and inflammation as sequelae of adiposity. She also studies the role of modifiable factors that influence these pathways, such as diet and life- style, in relation to the incidence of these diseases and other men’s health concerns. In addition, she studies these factors in association with benign conditions of the prostate and colon, including benign prostatic hyperplasia and adenomatous polyps. She has a long-standing interest uncovering expla- nations for the notably higher rate of prostate cancer in African-American compared to white men, including racial variation in sex steroid hormones in the in utero milieu and throughout life. Dr. Platz conducts her multidis- ciplinary work with an eye toward translation; that is, identifying strategies to prevent the development or progression of cancer. These goals have led to her recent research interest in the possible benefits of drugs for other indications, including statin drugs, as well as their underlying mechanisms of action in the prevention of the development and recurrence of prostate cancer. Finally, she dabbles in research that identifies and solves method- ological issues in study design germane to epidemiologic and translational studies on prostate cancer detection, incidence, prognosis, and recurrence. Cheryl Rock, PhD, RD, is a professor in the department of family and preventive medicine and the Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine. Dr. Rock also leads the Nutrition Shared Resource of the Moores Cancer Center. She completed undergraduate training in nutrition and dietetics at Michigan State University, achieved a master of medical science degree in clinical nutrition at Emory University, and was awarded her doctoral degree in nutritional sciences from the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Public Health. Dr. Rock’s primary research efforts are focused on the role of nutri- tional and dietary factors in the development and progression of cancer, particularly breast cancer, and weight management. Her research efforts address diet and weight management, and how diet, adiposity, and physi- cal activity affect risk and progression of cancer and other chronic diseases. Dr. Rock is presently involved in randomized trials funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the American Cancer Society that are test- ing whether modifications in diet and level of physical activity can alter

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109 APPENDIX C biological processes, hormonal factors, body weight, progression of cancer, and cardiovascular disease risk factors. She has served on numerous NIH and U.S. Department of Agriculture review panels and committees, and she currently serves on editorial boards for several peer-reviewed journals. Dr. Rock is the author of more than 200 scientific papers and book chapters. Thomas A. Wadden, PhD, is professor of psychology in psychiatry at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, where is also is director of the Center for Weight and Eating Disorders. He received his AB in 1975 from Brown University and his doctorate in clinical psychol- ogy in 1981 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Wadden’s principal research is on the treatment of obesity by methods that have included lifestyle modification, physical activity, very- low-calorie diets, medication, and surgery. He also has investigated the metabolic and behavioral consequences of obesity and weight loss. He has published more than 300 scientific papers and book chapters, and co-edited 6 books, the most recent of which is Obesity and Its Associated Eating Disor- ders: A Guide for Mental Health Practitioners (with Terrence Wilson, Albert Stunkard, and Robert Berkowitz). His research has been supported for more than 28 years by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Wadden is an associate editor of Obesity, published by The Obe- sity Society, of which he is a past president. He has served on several NIH panels, including study sections, the Task Force on the Prevention and Treatment of Obesity, and the Obesity Clinical Guidelines Committee. He currently is chairperson of the Lifestyle Intervention subcommittee of the Look AHEAD study, which is examining the health consequences of inten- tional weight loss in obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. His research has been recognized by several awards and prizes, including the George Bray Founders Award from The Obesity Society. Bruce M. Wolfe, MD, is a graduate of Stanford University and the St. Louis University School of Medicine. His surgical training was completed at St. Louis University. He did additional research training at Harvard Medical School. Relocating to Oregon Health & Science University from the University of California, Davis, he is part of their successful bariatric surgery team and performs procedures such as gastric bypass. Dr. Wolfe has devoted his surgical career to surgical nutrition and specifically obesity, including the surgical care of obese patients and related research. He has

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110 THE ROLE OF OBESITY IN CANCER made many contributions to the advancement of the surgical treatment of obesity, including a demonstration of the many benefits of laparoscopic surgery. He presently serves as the co-chair of the National Institutes of Health research consortium on bariatric surgery, known as LABS, and just concluded his term as president of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. He has participated in approximately 1,000 bariatric surgical procedures in his career. Jo Anne Zujewski, MD, is the head of breast cancer therapeutics in the Clinical Investigation Branch of the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). In this role, she is the sci- entific liaison and disease expert for breast cancer clinical trials sponsored by the CTEP program of the NCI. Dr. Zujewski’s research activities include the clinical development of targeted agents for the treatment of breast cancer. She was the founding chairperson of the Breast Cancer Faculty steering committee at NCI and a member of the planning committee for the National Institutes of Health Consensus conference for the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer, Preop- erative Therapy in Invasive Breast Cancer scheduled, and the state of the science meeting for Ductal Carcinoma in situ. She has an interest in global breast health and has served as an expert medical consultant to several international initiatives in breast cancer. She is the author of numerous publications in breast cancer treatment and prevention. A native of Chicago, Illinois, she received her bachelor of science in medical technology from Marquette University and her masters of administrative science from Johns Hopkins Evening College. Dr. Zujewski earned her MD at the University of Minnesota. She completed her internal medicine residency at University of Washington and her medical oncology fellowship at the University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Dr. Zujewski joined the staff at the National Cancer Institute in 1993. She spent her first 10 years at NCI in the intramural research program evaluating targeted therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. In November 2004, Dr. Zujewski was named to her current position.