Appendix B

Speaker Biographical Sketches

Eric Brown, M.E.T., co-founded ImpactGames to influence society and promote change through interactive media. Toward this end, ImpactGames developed PeaceMaker, a video game simulation of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict to promote dialogue and understanding. Unlike most serious games, PeaceMaker aims to bridge the gap between education and entertainment and reach a mass market. PeaceMaker has been sold in more than 60 countries, been featured in media outlets around the world, and won several international awards. ImpactGames also created Play the News, a Web-based platform to bring interactive gaming elements to the online news media industry. Play the News changes the paradigm of news consumption from passive reading to active engagement. Play the News won the first Knight Foundation News Game Award. Mr. Brown was listed as one of the “100 Social Entrepreneurs Changing the World” in Newsweek Japan. He holds a master’s degree in entertainment technology from Carnegie Mellon University and received a B.F.A. in painting, with focused studies in education and computer graphics, from Washington University in St. Louis.

Judith Carta, Ph.D., M.S., is director of early childhood research at the Juniper Gardens Children’s Project, a senior scientist in the Institute for Life Span Studies, and professor of special education at the University of Kansas. Her research focuses on developing strategies to minimize the effects of poverty on children’s development and translating that research into practices that can be used by teachers, parents, and other caregivers to promote children’s school readiness and prevent child neglect. Her work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Centers



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Appendix B Speaker Biographical Sketches Eric Brown, M.E.T., co-founded ImpactGames to influence society and promote change through interactive media. Toward this end, ImpactGames developed PeaceMaker, a video game simulation of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict to promote dialogue and understanding. Unlike most serious games, PeaceMaker aims to bridge the gap between education and entertainment and reach a mass market. PeaceMaker has been sold in more than 60 coun- tries, been featured in media outlets around the world, and won several in- ternational awards. ImpactGames also created Play the News, a Web-based platform to bring interactive gaming elements to the online news media industry. Play the News changes the paradigm of news consumption from passive reading to active engagement. Play the News won the first Knight Foundation News Game Award. Mr. Brown was listed as one of the “100 Social Entrepreneurs Changing the World” in Newsweek Japan. He holds a master’s degree in entertainment technology from Carnegie Mellon Uni- versity and received a B.F.A. in painting, with focused studies in education and computer graphics, from Washington University in St. Louis. Judith Carta, Ph.D., M.S., is director of early childhood research at the Juniper Gardens Children’s Project, a senior scientist in the Institute for Life Span Studies, and professor of special education at the University of Kansas. Her research focuses on developing strategies to minimize the ef- fects of poverty on children’s development and translating that research into practices that can be used by teachers, parents, and other caregiv- ers to promote children’s school readiness and prevent child neglect. Her work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Centers 134

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135 APPENDIX B for Disease Control and Prevention, the Department of Education, and the Administration for Children and Families, and since 1984 she has received federal grants totaling more than $28 million. She has been the principal investigator or collaborating researcher of numerous federally funded cen- ters, including the Early Childhood Research Institute on Substance Abuse, the Early Childhood Research Institute for the Measurement of Growth and Development, the Centers for the Study of Child Neglect, Using Cel- lular Phones for Enhancing Parenting Interventions for Preventing Child Maltreatment, Early Head Start National Research and Evaluation Project, the Center for Response to Early Intervention in Early Childhood, and the Technical Assistance Center for Social-Emotional Intervention. She was recently appointed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services to be part of the Advisory Committee on Head Start Research and Evaluation. Dr. Carta served for 10 years as the editor of Topics in Early Childhood Special Education and serves on the editorial boards of numerous scientific journals. Since 1985 she has been responsible for more than 100 publica- tions in peer-reviewed journals and has authored books and several book chapters related to evidence-based practices to improve the language and social competence of young children, reduce risk factors affecting children’s development, advance approaches for monitoring progress in young chil- dren, and promote parenting interventions to prevent child maltreatment. She is a national and international presenter and consultant to numerous projects in the United States, Australia, and New Zealand. Charlotte Cole, Ed.D., is senior vice president of global education at Sesame Workshop in New York, overseeing the nonprofit’s company-wide global strategies and leading the development of all curriculum and research around Sesame Workshop’s international projects. Working with educators and production teams throughout the world, she has most recently been en- gaged in projects in Bangladesh, Colombia, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Israel, Jordan, Mexico, Nigeria, Northern Ireland, South Africa, and West Bank/ Gaza. Prior to joining the workshop, Dr. Cole worked as a senior researcher at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston on a longitudinal study of families of children with acute and chronic illness funded by the National Institutes of Health. She has also served as a consultant to the Harvard Institute for International Development on several child-health projects in Thailand. Dr. Cole received her doctorate in human development and psychology from the Harvard Graduate School of Education at Harvard University. Her teaching experience includes serving as a course instructor at Boston Col- lege (Newton, Massachusetts), Lesley College (Cambridge, Massachusetts), and Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College (Terre Haute, Indiana). She has worked as a board member for several community service organizations, including the Council on Domestic Abuse in Terre Haute, Indiana; Oxford

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136 COMMUNICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY FOR VIOLENCE PREVENTION Academy in Westbrook, Connecticut; and NetAid in New York. She is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Children and Media and served as the publication’s first review and commentary editor. Constance DeCherney is a strategist for iCrossing, where she serves clients across numerous categories, including finance, travel, and health care. iCrossing is a unit of the Hearst Corporation. Prior to joining iCrossing, Ms. DeCherney led global digital strategy and innovation for the Planned Parenthood Federation of America. She built an award-winning mobile program and implemented search and social media strategies as well as a national social governance program. Under her leadership, Planned Parent- hood was ranked 13th out of 100 by L2 Think Tank for the Public Sector Digital IQ Index and received an eHEALTHCARE Award for Best Design in 2010. She has lectured at Columbia University and New York University and has been interviewed on culture and the Web by the New York Daily News, BusinessWeek, and MSNBC.com. She earned a dual B.A. in anthro- pology and political science from the University of Delaware. XinQi Dong, M.D., M.P.H., is the associate director of the Rush Institute for Healthy Aging and an associate professor of medicine, nursing, and be- havioral sciences at the Rush University Medical Center. Having emigrated from China, he has had longstanding interests in human rights and social justice issues in vulnerable populations. Dr. Dong’s research focuses on the epidemiological studies of elder abuse in the United States and China, with particular emphasis on its adverse health outcomes and its relationship between psychological and social well-being. He currently is an American Political Science Association Congressional Policy Fellow/Health and Aging Policy Fellow working with a diverse group of policy leaders at the na- tional, state, and local levels on issues relevant to elder abuse. He has been working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institute on Aging, and the National Academy of Sciences on the state of the science for the issues of elder abuse. Moreover, he has been working with the Chicago Well-Being Task Force and the legislative task force to revise and ultimately pass the Illinois Elder Abuse Act. Currently, Dr. Dong serves as a senior policy and research advisor for the Administration on Aging at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and a senior policy advisor for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. He is actively working with Chinese communities to promote understanding and civic engagement on the issues of elder abuse through innovative, culturally and linguistically appropriate ways. He serves on the board of directors for the Chinese American Service League, the largest social services organiza- tion in the Midwest serving the needs of Chinese population. He is a fellow of the Institute of Medicine of Chicago and a member of the Institute of

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137 APPENDIX B Medicine’s Forum on Global Violence Prevention. He is a Beeson Scholar and is the recipient of the Nobuo Maeda International Aging and Public Health Research Award, the National Physician Advocacy Merit Award, and the Maxwell A. Pollack Award in productive aging from the Geronto- logical Society of America. Mick Fealty is a writer and analyst and is the founding editor of Slugger O’Toole, one of Northern Ireland’s leading political blogs. His study of the future of unionism in Northern Ireland was widely acclaimed on all sides of the political divide. He has blogged for a number of other websites, including live reporting from the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Abuja, Nigeria, in December 2003. He is currently working in partnership with the British Council in Dublin as commissioning editor for the Britain and Ireland website which is tasked with examining the politi- cal and cultural shifts in relations between the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland since the signing of the historic Belfast Agreement. He has also written for a number of publications on the subject of journalism and the challenge of the new media. He was born in Belfast and now lives in Dorset, where he also teaches the Irish language to adults. Michael Feigelson, M.P.A., is a native of New York City and worked in Chiapas for the child-protection nongovernmental organization Melel Xojobal before completing a masters in public affairs at Princeton Univer- sity and joining the Bernard van Leer Foundation in 2007, initially as a program officer. He has worked with various international organizations, including UNICEF and the International Rescue Committee, and was the recipient of a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship through which he worked with street children in Mexico, Ghana, and Romania. He also spent some time as a business analyst at McKinsey & Co. Dahna Goldstein, M.B.A., is the founder and chief executive officer of PhilanTech, LLC, provider of the PhilanTrack online grants management system (patent pending), a Web-based platform that helps social sector organizations manage grant information more efficiently for greater social impact. Prior to starting PhilanTech, Ms. Goldstein worked for venture phi- lanthropies, including Ashoka and the Blue Ridge Foundation New York, and produced interactive eLearning programs for the Global Education Network and Harvard Business School Publishing, including the award- winning “What Is a Leader?” program. A graduate of Williams College, she also holds a master of education degree, with a concentration in technology, from Harvard University, and an M.B.A. from the Stern School of Business at New York University. She has written extensively about change manage- ment and data integration in the nonprofit sector, including a chapter on

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138 COMMUNICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY FOR VIOLENCE PREVENTION managing change for technology in Managing Technology to Meet Your Mission: A Strategic Guide for Nonprofit Leaders (Wiley, 2009). She serves on the board of JustGive.org and was recently named one of Business- Week’s 25 Most Promising Social Entrepreneurs. Scott Goodstein is founder and chief executive officer of RevolutionMessaging. com, a progressive digital and mobile technology company. Mr. Goodstein was external online director for Obama for America in 2008 and developed the campaign’s social networking platforms. His pioneering work included running the first political campaign effort to launch niche-based social networks such as BlackPlanet, Eons, MiGente, AsianAve, and Disaboom. He built the campaign’s lifestyle marketing strategy and developed the “street team” materials used in battleground states. He also created and implemented Obama Mobile, an advanced communication strategy that included text messaging, downloads, interactive voice response communica- tion, a mobile website (WAP), and even an iPhone application. Prior to his work at Obama for America, Mr. Goodstein worked for the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, and more than two dozen progressive political initiatives. In 2004 he co-founded Punkvoter.com and Rock Against Bush, which became a $4 million young-voter mobilization effort. He has conducted political training for the National Democratic Institute, UNICEF, Democracy for America, the Campaign Management Institute, and the New Organizing Institute. Mr. Goodstein has spoken at Columbia University, American University, George Washington University, and the Milken Institute. He has been a featured speaker at events in Morocco, Hungary, Finland, Singapore, and Malaysia. John Gordon is senior vice president of digital in Fenton’s New York of- fice and manages the social media practice firm-wide. In that position he works to create successful engagement campaigns by integrating strategy, technology, and content for clients like the American Jewish World Service, ASPCA, and Stonyfield Organics. Mr. Gordon was formerly the director of new media at Spitfire Strategies, where he helped clients such as the Hewlett Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Joint Ocean Commission use new media to drive supporters, win campaigns, and build capacity. While at Spitfire, Mr. Gordon worked with the president of the firm to develop a comprehensive step-by-step guidebook to help nonprofits plan public policy, advocacy, and social marketing campaigns. Prior to Spitfire, Mr. Gordon was the director of interactive communications and marketing at the Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA), where he developed on- line marketing and communications initiatives that served the membership, fundraising, advocacy, and e-commerce goals of the national organization

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139 APPENDIX B and more than 300 Girl Scout councils nationwide. He created GSUSA’s first online marketing campaign to support the $700 million annual cookie sale and led Web strategy for a Dove Super Bowl ad campaign in partner- ship with Unilever. Prior to GSUSA, he was partner and creative director at the Carol/Trevelyan Strategy Group (CTSG), where he led the development of award-winning creative campaigns, including the reality show–inspired cartoon series “Republican Survivor” for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and Amnesty International’s Stop Violence Against Women. His innovative efforts have been recognized with multiple Webby, Pollie, and Golden Dot awards. Devon Halley is a senior technology consultant at Deloitte Consulting LLP. He co-authored “XBC: Creating Public Value by Unleashing the Power of Cross-Boundary Collaboration” as well as “What Geeks Can Teach Government” for Governing magazine. He is a recent alumnus of Deloitte’s GovLab, which is a program that works closely with senior government ex- ecutives and thought leaders to conduct research into critical and emerging issues shaping the public and nonprofit sectors in order to develop innova- tive yet practical ways that governments can transform the way they deliver their services and prepare for the challenges ahead. Mr. Halley is currently helping the Transportation Security Administration find ways to leverage social computing to meet critical mission needs and improve the passenger experience. He holds degrees from Allegheny College and Carnegie Mellon University. Frances Henry, M.B.A., serves as advisor to the F. Felix Foundation. From 2005 to 2009, she created and directed Global Violence Prevention, a project which advanced the science-based prevention of violence in low- and middle-income countries through a coalition of U.S. researchers and practitioners. Based on her experiences of childhood sexual abuse, for 13 years she founded and directed Stop It Now!, an organization that prevents the sexual abuse of children. She is author of Vaccines for Violence, a set of five essays exploring how she learned to counter violence by dealing with fear, by balancing accountability and compassion, and by increasing her capacity to connect to others. Ms. Henry’s previous work includes owning a management consulting company and directing presidential and guberna - torial commissions for women. She served as staff to the U.S. Commission on International Women’s Year. Erik Hersman, who was raised in Kenya and Sudan, is now a technologist and blogger who lives in Nairobi. He is a co-founder of Ushahidi, a free and open-source platform for crowdsourcing information and visualizing data. He is the founder of AfriGadget, a multi-author site that showcases

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140 COMMUNICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY FOR VIOLENCE PREVENTION stories of African inventions and ingenuity and is an African technology blogger at WhiteAfrican.com. He currently manages Ushahidi’s operations and strategy and is in charge of the iHub, Nairobi’s Innovation Hub for the technology community, bringing together entrepreneurs, hackers, designers, and the investment community. Mr. Hersman is a TED Senior Fellow, a PopTech Fellow and speaker, and an organizer for Maker Faire Africa. You can find him on Twitter at @WhiteAfrican. Dale Kunkel, Ph.D., is professor of communication at the University of Arizona. Dr. Kunkel studies children and media issues from diverse perspec- tives, including television-effects research as well as assessments of media industry content and practices. He is a former Congressional science fellow and has testified as an expert witness on children’s media topics at numer- ous hearings before the U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of Representatives, and the Federal Communications Commission. Dr. Kunkel previously taught at Indiana University and the University of California, Santa Barbara. Among the topics he examines are the effects of television violence, sexual content, and advertising on young people. Donna Levin has had a 15-year career as a social entrepreneur, most re- cently serving as vice president of operations at Upromise.com, an online service that helps families save for college. At Care.com, Ms. Levin has served on the management team as vice president, operations, establishing the company’s safety and customer service infrastructure. Care.com (www. care.com) is the largest and fastest-growing service used by families seeking high-quality caregivers, providing a place to easily connect with hundreds of thousands of care providers, share care giving experiences, and get ad- vice. Care.com has been featured in national news outlets including NBC’s Today, Good Morning America, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, USA Today, Parenting, and Fortune. In September 2011 she transi- tioned to spearhead new programs for families who face some of the most challenging care situations—our nation’s military population and families with special-needs children and seniors. With a strong belief that both government and corporate entities have a fundamental responsibility to help improve their communities, she and her team are currently developing innovative technologies and resources to unite all sectors in their mission. Ms. Levin holds a B.A. from Emerson College. Harriet MacMillan, M.D., Ms.C., is a psychiatrist and pediatrician con- ducting family violence research. She is a member of the Offord Centre for Child Studies and professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioural neurosciences and in the department of pediatrics at McMaster University, with associate memberships in the department of clinical epidemiology and

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141 APPENDIX B biostatistics and the department of psychology. Dr. MacMillan holds the David R. (Dan) Offord Chair in Child Studies and has received funding support from the WT Grant Foundation, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, NARSAD and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. From 1993 to 2004, she was the founding director of the Child Advo- cacy and Assessment Program (CAAP) at McMaster Children’s Hospital, a multidisciplinary program committed to reducing the burden of suffering associated with family violence. Her research focuses on the epidemiol- ogy of violence against children and women, including prevention of child maltreatment and intimate partner violence. She has led randomized con- trolled trials investigating the effectiveness of such approaches as universal screening in reducing intimate partner violence and nurse home visitation in preventing the recurrence of physical abuse and neglect among children. Joseph McCannon is senior advisor to the administrator and group direc- tor of learning and diffusion in the Innovation Center at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Prior to this, he was vice president and a faculty member on dissemination and large-scale improvement at the In- stitute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). He worked at IHI beginning in 2001, leading organizational efforts to spread change in Africa, the United States, and several other regions. Specifically, he supported IHI’s collabora- tion with the World Health Organization to design and amplify its “3 by 5” initiative, an effort to deliver antiretroviral drugs to 3 million people glob- ally by the end of 2005. He also directed the organization’s major domestic initiatives to improve patient safety, the 100,000 Lives Campaign and the 5 Million Lives Campaign, which involved more than 4,000 hospitals and 70 field offices. He has advised or consulted on other national quality-improve- ment efforts in the United States, England, Japan, Canada, and Denmark and on initiatives outside health care (e.g., homelessness and corrections) as well. Mr. McCannon started his career in the publishing industry, with roles at Fast Company, Atlantic Monthly, and Outside magazines. He is a graduate of Harvard University and was a Reuters and Merck fellow at Stanford University in 2003–2004. Brigid McCaw, M.D., M.P.H., M.S., FACP, is medical director for the Fam- ily Violence Prevention Program at Kaiser Permanente (KP). Her teaching, research, and publications focus on developing a health systems response to intimate partner violence and the impact of intimate partner violence on health status and mental health. She is a fellow of the American College of Physicians. KP, a large nonprofit integrated health care organization serving 8.6 million members in nine states and the District of Columbia, has imple- mented one of the most comprehensive health care responses to domestic violence in the United States. The nationally recognized “systems model”

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142 COMMUNICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY FOR VIOLENCE PREVENTION approach is available across the continuum of care including outpatient, emergency, and inpatient care; advice and call centers; and chronic care programs. The electronic medical record includes clinician tools to facilitate recognition, referrals, resources, and follow-up for patients experiencing domestic violence and provides data for quality improvement measures. Over the past decade, identification of domestic violence has increased six- fold, with most members identified in the ambulatory rather than acute care settings. The majority of identified patients receive follow-up mental health services. KP also provides prevention, outreach, and domestic violence re- sources for its workforce. Violence prevention is an important focus for KP community benefit investments and research studies. The KP program, un- der the leadership of Brigid McCaw, has received several national awards. Kathleen (Kay) McGowan provides policy advice to the administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) on political and devel- opment issues pertaining to Afghanistan. A Persian speaker, Ms. McGowan has been involved in rebuilding Afghanistan since 2003, when she served as chief of staff to U.S. Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad at the American embassy in Kabul. At USAID she is responsible for identifying high-impact development opportunities that complement the U.S. government’s civilian assistance portfolio for Afghanistan and foster improved coordination with Afghan public- and private-sector stakeholders. Specifically, she pursues foundational investments that are appropriate to Afghanistan’s current capacity and needs, that are sustainable, and that contribute directly to Afghanistan’s capacity to transition to full sovereignty. She leads USAID’s effort to leverage the success of Afghanistan’s mobile telephony network for economic and social development goals, including scaling the country’s nascent mobile money sector and building innovative extension services for agriculture, health, and education into USAID’s assistance portfolio. Before joining USAID, Ms. McGowan ran the political section at the Iran Regional Presence Office out of the U.S. consulate in Dubai. In 2006–2007, she was a Rusk teaching fellow at Georgetown University’s Institute for the Study of Diplomacy, where she remains a non-resident associate. She has written about Afghanistan for the New York Times and State magazine. She is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations. James A. Mercy, Ph.D., is Special Advisor for Strategic Directions at the Division of Violence Prevention in the National Center for Injury Preven- tion and Control of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He began working at CDC in a newly formed activity to examine violence as a public health problem and, over the past two decades, has helped to develop the public health approach to violence and conducted and overseen numerous studies of the epidemiology of youth suicide, family violence,

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143 APPENDIX B homicide, and firearm injuries. Dr. Mercy also served as a co-editor of the World Report on Violence and Health prepared by the World Health Or- ganization (WHO) and served on the editorial board of the United Nations Secretary General’s Study of Violence Against Children. Most recently, he’s been working on a global partnership with UNICEF, PEPFAR, WHO, and others to end sexual violence against girls. His recent publications include “Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Conduct Disorder, and Young Adult Intimate Partner Violence” (Archives of General Psychiatry, 2010) and “Sexual Violence and Its Health Consequences for Female Children in Swaziland: A Cluster Survey Study” (Lancet, 2009). Michele Moloney-Kitts, M.A., is the managing director of Together for Girls, providing strategic leadership to the partnership as well as manage- ment and oversight of day-to-day operations. A staff member of UNAIDS, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, she also serves as a senior advisor to the executive director. Prior to joining Together for Girls, Ms. Moloney-Kitts served as the assistant global AIDS coordinator for the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). As a leader in international public health for more than 30 years, her primary focus has been on women and children. She has served as a health officer for U.S. Agency for International Development, with long-term postings in Mo- rocco, Cambodia, South Africa, and Washington, DC. Within PEPFAR she was the deputy assistant secretary responsible for oversight of field imple- mentation and multilateral relations. In that capacity she also served on the board of the Global Fund for AIDS, TB, and Malaria and as the chairman of the Portfolio and Implementation Committee. Ms. Moloney-Kitts has worked as a nurse practitioner and a nurse midwife, with a particular focus on underserved populations, especially adolescents. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Boston College and a master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania. Eesha Pandit is currently women’s rights manager at Breakthrough. She is the former director of advocacy at MergerWatch, where she worked on the Raising Women’s Voices project, a national initiative working to make sure women’s voices are heard and that women’s concerns are addressed in national health reform policy. Previously, Ms. Pandit served as associate director of programs at the Civil Liberties and Public Policy Program and has been a weekly staff writer for RH Reality Check. She has also worked with the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard University and Amnesty International USA’s Women’s Rights Program. She serves on the board of the New York Abortion Access Fund and the National Network of Abortion Funds. She is a graduate of Mount Holyoke College and the University of Chicago.

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144 COMMUNICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY FOR VIOLENCE PREVENTION John Pollock is an award-winning analyst, writer, and communicator. He has consulted at senior levels for nonprofit organizations, in the private sector, in the public sector, and for government. Former clients include in- ternational organizations such as the United Nations, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, and the World Health Organiza- tion; government departments, such as the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development; and ministers, including H.E. President Kagame of Rwanda and his cabinet. Private-sector clients include blue chips such as eBay (for which he was Chief Clue Elf), BlackBerry, and T-Mobile, as well as major nonprofit organizations such as Oxfam and Save the Chil- dren. A former research academic at Manchester University, he went on to become the UK government’s first social policy researcher specializing in the environment. For several years he specialized in exploring how the private sector could have an impact on the global HIV/AIDS epidemic. He has published in publications around the world, including Technology Review, the Guardian, the Times, and Red Herring. He has a longstanding interest in the nexus among creativity, policy, and technology. Recently he has been working on a series of high-level briefing, and white papers on subjects as diverse as career advice and diversity, examining adaptive strategies during rapid global change. His most recent work includes long-form reporting and blogging for Technology Review on social media and the Arab Spring. He is currently working on a follow-up based on the Libyan conflict. Jody Ranck, Ph.D., has a career in health, development, and innovation spanning nearly 20 years. In addition to his work with the mHealth Alli- ance, Dr. Ranck has consulted with InSTEDD, IntraHealth, Cisco, GigaOM, and a number of other organizations on innovation strategies, ehealth, and health policy. He is an adjunct faculty member at the University of San Francisco School of Business and Management and also a principal inves- tigator at the Public Health Institute in Oakland, CA. His previous work has included efforts in post-genocide Rwanda, risk and new biotechnologies (Zambia), the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, and leading the Global Health practice and Health Horizons at the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto, California. Dr. Ranck has a doctorate in health policy and administration from the University of California, Berkeley, as well as an M.A. in interna- tional relations and economics (Johns Hopkins University–SAIS) and a B.A. in biology from Ithaca College. Daniel J. Reidenberg, Psy.D., is the executive director of SAVE (Suicide Awareness Voices of Education), a national nonprofit agency working to prevent suicide and help suicide survivors and people suffering from brain illnesses. Dr. Reidenberg also serves as managing director of the National Council for Suicide Prevention and is the U.S. representative

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145 APPENDIX B to the International Association for Suicide Prevention. Dr. Reidenberg has done extensive work with adolescents and adults who have serious and persistent mental illnesses, are chemically dependent, or have diverse personality disorders. He is a consultant to psychologists, attorneys, and businesses on health care and legal matters, is a nationally and internation- ally sought-after speaker, and sits on numerous national expert panels for suicide prevention and mental health issues. He is the chair of the Ameri- can Psychotherapy Association (APA) and of the Certified Relationship Specialists Board and is on the APA editorial board, the editorial board of Esperanza magazine, and the advisory board to Reachout.com. He has re- ceived numerous awards, including being named one of the Ten Outstand- ing Young Minnesotans (2006), the B. Warren Hart Award for service to humanity (2007), and Nonprofit Professional of the Year (2010), and he was recognized as a Champion of Change by the Obama Administration (August 2011). William (Bill) Riley, Ph.D., is a program director in the Division of Car- diovascular Sciences at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and is responsible for managing grant portfolios in tobacco control and other cardiovascular and respiratory risk behaviors. He also serves as the chair of the National Institutes of Health mHealth Inter-Institute Interest Group. He is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Prevention and Commu- nity Health at the George Washington University School of Public Health. His research areas include eHealth and mHealth applications, tobacco de- pendence, diet and exercise adherence, insomnia treatment, and behavioral assessment. Mark L. Rosenberg, M.D., M.P.P., is executive director of the Task Force for Global Health. Previously, for 20 years, Dr. Rosenberg was at the Cen- ters for Disease Control for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where he led work in violence prevention and later became the first permanent director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. He also held the position of Special Assistant for Behavioral Science in the Office of the Deputy Director (HIV/AIDS). Dr. Rosenberg is board-certified in both psychiatry and internal medicine with training in public policy. He is on the faculty at Morehouse Medical School, Emory Medical School, and the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. Dr. Rosenberg’s research and programmatic interests are concentrated on injury control and violence prevention, HIV/AIDS, and child well-being, with special attention to behavioral sciences, evaluation, and health communications. He has au- thored more than 120 publications and recently co-authored the book Real Collaboration: What It Takes for Global Health to Succeed (University of California Press, 2010). Dr. Rosenberg has received numerous awards,

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146 COMMUNICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY FOR VIOLENCE PREVENTION including the Surgeon General’s Exemplary Service Medal. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). Dr. Rosenberg’s organization, the Task Force for Global Health, participated in the IOM-sponsored workshop Violence Prevention in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Finding a Place on the Global Agenda, and the Task Force remains interested in helping to continue the momentum of the workshop through the Forum on Global Violence Prevention. The Task Force is heavily involved the delivery of a number of global health programs and sees many ways that interpersonal violence and conflict exacerbate serious health problems and inequities. Jason Rzepka is vice president of public affairs at MTV. His charge, quite simply, is to use MTV’s superpowers for good. He does this by marshaling the network’s forces to engage and activate America’s youth on the big- gest challenges facing their generation. He is responsible for the strategic direction of all of MTV’s “pro-social” campaigns, including the boundary- shattering, Peabody-winning “It’s Your (Sex) Life,” with the Kaiser Family Foundation, which has reached more than 200 million young people on sexual health issues; Emmy-winning “Choose or Lose,” which has helped drive the largest youth voter turnouts in U.S. history; and Webby-winning “A Thin Line,” which has inspired more than 1 million young people to draw their own line between digital use and digital abuse (all forms of digi- tal bullying, dating abuse, and discrimination). Mr. Rzepka regularly serves as an expert resource on issues such as youth mobilization, social media for social change, cyberbullying, and sexual health. He has been a featured speaker at the White House, the United Nations, the U.S. Capitol, the U.S. State Department, the International AIDS Conference, TEDxPresidio, South by Southwest Interactive, the National Conference on Volunteering and Service, the Games for Change Conference, YPulse Youth Marketing Mashup, and the Council on Foundations Family Philanthropy Conference. He has also appeared on CNN and NPR and been quoted by the Wall Street Journal, Reuters, ABC News, Huffington Post, and others. Prior to his cur- rent role, he served as the head of communications at the PopTech Institute, a renowned social innovation incubator hatching breakthrough solutions to some of the world’s most intractable social challenges. Before PopTech, Mr. Rzepka held senior communications positions at MTV, mtvU, IMAX Corporation, and Ruder Finn. He serves on the board of directors of Pop- Tech; the advisory board of Coffee Party USA, a non-partisan organization working to bring civility and responsible citizenship back to American de- mocracy; and the Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention Public Awareness taskforce. He holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

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147 APPENDIX B Ben Sawyer has pioneered major initiatives in the field of serious games and has become a nationally recognized leader within the games community since beginning his career in game development over 10 years ago. For the past 7 years Mr. Sawyer has dedicated his professional life to discovering new ways to expand the use of games beyond entertainment. In 2002 he co-founded the Serious Games Initiative, a project of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. The following year Mr. Sawyer organized the first-ever Serious Games Summit, a conference that now annually at- tracts 300 to 500 attendees who meet to share best practices in the devel- opment of serious games. The Serious Games Initiative continues to serve as one of the leading organizations in the field of serious games. In 2004 Mr. Sawyer also co-founded the Games for Health project, an initiative that has built the primary social and professional networks of the health games industry. Through online resources and regular regional and national events, Games for Health connects health professionals, researchers, and game developers to advance the development of health games and game technologies. The Games for Health project receives major funding from the Pioneer Portfolio, an initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Founda- tion. As a game developer with his own firm, Digitalmill, Mr. Sawyer has worked on more than two dozen major serious game projects beginning in 2000, when he served as producer for the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s university simulation game, “Virtual U,” which was an award finalist at that year’s Independent Games Festival. Prior to pursuing his professional career, Mr. Sawyer graduated from the Bronx High School of Science and studied at Baruch College. Kim Scott, M.B.B.S., M.P.H., is an adolescent health and development consultant who completed her bachelor’s degree in human biology and psychology at the University of Toronto, Canada, and her medical degree at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica. After working in medical private practice and adolescent clinics, she went on to do her master’s de- gree in public health in the Bronx, New York, focusing on behavioral and emotional development in adolescence. She analysed the Jamaican data of the Pan-American Health Organization 1997 Caribbean Adolescent Health Survey and has written three papers: “Adolescent Violence,” “Adolescent Suicide,” and “Adolescent Resiliency.” From 2000 to 2002 she worked with the Ministry of Health, Health Promotion and Protections Division, advocating for and coordinating the National Adolescent Health Program. She worked with the Academy for Educational Development in Wash- ington, DC, where she designed and conducted adolescent resiliency re- search and developed and implemented a home visiting parenting program for adolescents. She has conducted multiple training seminars for various private and public sectors around parenting and adolescent health risk

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148 COMMUNICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY FOR VIOLENCE PREVENTION and resiliency (specifically sexuality, HIV and pregnancy, drugs, violence, depression, and suicide) including coaches, pastors, guidance counselors, teachers and health service personnel. She contributed to the National Adolescent Development Strategic Plan 2005 and conducted an extensive parenting research literature review in 2006. She contributed to content writing, review, and field testing of the “Parenting the Adolescent” curricu- lum for Family Health International and JA–Style. She reviewed and revised the National Plan of Action for Children and Violence (NPACV) 2011 on behalf of the Organisation of American States and the Child Development Agency. In 2011 she conducted a situation analysis as to the child-friendly school status of the Jamaican Education Sector on behalf of the government and UNICEF. She is the founder and director of the Child Resiliency Pro- gramme, an after-school program for children at risk for violence referred from primary schools. She is a member of the International Association of Adolescent Health, the Society of Adolescent Health and Medicine, and the Medical Association of Jamaica. Andra Teten Tharp, Ph.D., is a health scientist in the Division of Violence Prevention (DVP) in the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Tharp is currently leading Dating Matters: Strategies to Promote Healthy Teen Rela- tionships, a teen dating violence prevention initiative at the CDC. Following her doctoral studies in clinical psychology at the University of Oregon, she conducted research and clinical work at the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. In 2008 she received the young investigator award from the International Society for Research on Aggression for her research examining violence among veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder. Dr. Tharp joined the CDC in 2008 as a behavioral scientist in the Prevention, Development, and Evaluation Branch in DVP. She continues to hold a clinical assistant profes- sorship in the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in Houston, Texas, and is a licensed clinical psychologist in Texas. Dr. Tharp’s research interests include sexual and teen dating violence preven- tion. She has written and contributed to numerous publications on trauma and violence-related topics. Kasisomayajula “Vish” Viswanath, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the department of society, human development, and health at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and in the Division of Population Sciences at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. He is director of the Health Commu- nication Core of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (DF/HCC), and co-leader of the Cancer Risk and Disparities Program of DF/HCC. He also chairs the steering committee for the Health Communication Concentration

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149 APPENDIX B at HSPH. His additional appointments include director, Enhancing Commu- nication for Health Outcomes (ECHO) Laboratory, DF/HCC, and associate director, Lung Cancer Disparities Center, HSPH. Dr. Viswanath received his doctoral degree in mass communication from the University of Minnesota. His primary research is in documenting the relationship between commu- nication inequalities, poverty, and health disparities. He has written more than 110 journal articles and book chapters concerning communication inequalities and health disparities, public health communication campaigns, e-health and the digital divide, public health preparedness, and the delivery of health communication interventions to underserved populations. He is the co-editor of three books: Mass Media, Social Control and Social Change (Iowa State University Press, 1999), Health Behavior and Health Educa- tion: Theory, Research & Practice (Jossey Bass, 2008), and The Role of Media in Promoting and Reducing Tobacco Use (National Cancer Institute, 2008). He was also the editor of the “Social and Behavioral Research” section of the 12-volume International Encyclopedia of Communication (Blackwell Publishing, 2008). In recognition of his academic and profes- sional achievements, Dr. Viswanath received several awards, including the Outstanding Health Communication Scholar Award (2010), jointly given out by the International Communication Association and the National Communication Association, and the Mayhew Derryberry Award from the American Public Health Association (APHA) for his contribution to health education research and theory (2009). He delivered the 23rd Annual Aubrey Fisher Lecture at University of Utah in 2009. He was elected fellow of the International Communication Association (2011), the Society for Be- havioral Medicine (2008), and the Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research (2006). He was also chair of the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Center for Health Marketing at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 2008 to 2010. Lisa Witter is the chief operating officer of Fenton, the largest public interest communications firm in the United States. She heads the firm’s practice in women’s issues and global affairs for clients including Women for Women International, MoveOn.org, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the David and Lucille Packard Foundation, the American Medical Association, the American Lung Association, and many others. She is a co-founder of the award-winning website SheSource.org, an online brain trust of women experts to help close the gender gap among commentators in the news media. She was honored as an outstanding activist and expert on women’s issues by Oxygen.com for her work on a national campaign against priva- tizing Social Security during the 2000 presidential election. Ms. Witter is a blogger and political commentator with work appearing on MSNBC, Fox News, the Huffington Post, AlterNet, and Anderson Cooper 360. In 2004,

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150 COMMUNICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY FOR VIOLENCE PREVENTION she was a contestant on the Showtime reality show American Candidate. Witter is co-author of The She Spot: Why Women Are the Market for Changing the World and How to Reach Them. She is on the advisory board for Indianapolis University’s Women and Philanthropy Institute, Pop!Tech, Momsrising.org, Women for Women International, and Climate Counts. Ashley Womble has more than 8 years of experience working in the pub- lishing industry and has developed an expertise in digital communications and social media. As the online communications manager at the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, Ms. Womble works to develop innovative on- line marketing approaches and strategic partnerships with key stakeholders in social media to reach more persons in emotional distress or at risk of suicide. Prior to joining the Lifeline, Ms. Womble worked as an editor for Hearst Digital Media and played a key role of the development of Cosmopolitan.com and CountryLiving.com. She created partnerships with media companies (from Google and Yahoo to Foursquare) and spoke about the Hearst Digital Media’s online and social media efforts. In these roles, Ms. Womble played a significant role in rebranding traditional print media into new media.