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Steering Committee, Panel, and
Staff Biographical Information

STEERING COMMITTEE

RAYMOND S. COLLADAY, Chair, is the president of RC Space Enterprises, Inc., an aerospace consulting company. He is a retired corporate officer of the Lockheed Martin Corporation and the former president of the Lockheed Martin Astronautics Company in Denver. He has taught leadership and ethics for the Colorado School of Mines; and has served on a number of steering committees, boards, and commissions. Before entering the private sector, he was director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and was associate administrator of NASA, where he had senior executive responsibility for the agency’s aeronautics and space research and technology development including operations oversight of Ames, Langley, Dryden, and Glenn Research Centers. Dr. Colladay started his aerospace career at NASA Glenn Research Center in propulsion research and development (R&D) before moving to NASA Headquarters where he moved up through a number of leadership positions before being appointed associate administrator. He has been a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and various Defense Science Board summer studies. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and of the American Astronautical Society. He earned his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Michigan State University. Dr. Colladay has served on many National Research Council (NRC) committees, including the Committee on the Rationale and Goals of the U.S. Civil Space Program and the Planning Committee for Workshop on U.S. Civil Space Policy Committee for the Review of NASA’s Capability Roadmaps. Dr. Colladay also serves as chair of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board.

JOHN D. ANDERSON, JR., is the curator of aerodynamics at the National Air and Space Museum and is professor emeritus of aerospace engineering at the University of Maryland (UM). At UM he was department chair from 1973 to 1980, and a distinguished scholar/teacher until his retirement in 1999. Prior to that, from 1959 to 1962 he served as lieutenant and task scientist at the Aerospace Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (AFB) working in hypersonic aerodynamics. From 1966 to 1972 he was chief of the Hypersonics Group at the U.S. Naval Ordnance Laboratory. At UM, he conducted research in hypersonic and high temperature gas dynamics, atmospheric entry vehicles, and hypersonic scramjet engines. At the National Air and Space Museum he conducts research on the history of aeronautical engineering. He has published ten book titles with McGraw-Hill, Cambridge University Press, Academic Press, and Johns Hopkins University Press, as well as over 120 papers on radiative gas dynamics, entry aerothermodynamics, gas dynamic and chemical lasers, computational fluid dynamics, applied



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R Steering Committee, Panel, and Staff Biographical Information STEERING COMMITTEE RAYMOND S. COLLADAY, Chair, is the president of RC Space Enterprises, Inc., an aerospace consulting company. He is a retired corporate officer of the Lockheed Martin Corporation and the former president of the Lockheed Martin Astronautics Company in Denver. He has taught leadership and ethics for the Colorado School of Mines; and has served on a number of steering committees, boards, and commissions. Before entering the private sector, he was director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) of the U.S. Depart - ment of Defense (DOD) and was associate administrator of NASA, where he had senior executive responsibility for the agency’s aeronautics and space research and technology development including operations oversight of Ames, Langley, Dryden, and Glenn Research Centers. Dr. Colladay started his aerospace career at NASA Glenn Research Center in propulsion research and development (R&D) before moving to NASA Headquarters where he moved up through a number of leadership positions before being appointed associate administrator. He has been a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and various Defense Science Board summer studies. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and of the American Astronautical Society. He earned his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Michigan State University. Dr. Colladay has served on many National Research Council (NRC) committees, including the Committee on the Rationale and Goals of the U.S. Civil Space Program and the Planning Committee for Workshop on U.S. Civil Space Policy Committee for the Review of NASA’s Capability Roadmaps. Dr. Colladay also serves as chair of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. JOHN D. ANDERSON, JR., is the curator of aerodynamics at the National Air and Space Museum and is profes - sor emeritus of aerospace engineering at the University of Maryland (UM). At UM he was department chair from 1973 to 1980, and a distinguished scholar/teacher until his retirement in 1999. Prior to that, from 1959 to 1962 he served as lieutenant and task scientist at the Aerospace Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (AFB) working in hypersonic aerodynamics. From 1966 to 1972 he was chief of the Hypersonics Group at the U.S. Naval Ordnance Laboratory. At UM, he conducted research in hypersonic and high temperature gas dynamics, atmospheric entry vehicles, and hypersonic scramjet engines. At the National Air and Space Museum he conducts research on the history of aeronautical engineering. He has published ten book titles with McGraw-Hill, Cambridge University Press, Academic Press, and Johns Hopkins University Press, as well as over 120 papers on radiative gas dynamics, entry aerothermodynamics, gas dynamic and chemical lasers, computational fluid dynamics, applied 332

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333 APPENDIX R aerodynamics, hypersonic flow, and the history of aerodynamics. He is a member for the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, and an honorary fellow of the AIAA. He earned his Ph.D. in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from Ohio State University. He has served on three NRC Panels to Review Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Proposals in Fluids (1996, 2002, and 2004). JAMES B. ARMOR, JR., is vice president, strategy and business development, at ATK Spacecraft Systems & Services, where he is responsible for small satellite, satellite component, and engineering services business areas. Major General Armor is also on the Board of Directors of NAVSYS Corporation, Colorado Springs, Colorado, a firm providing advanced research and development products and services in Global Positioning System (GPS) and other timing and navigation systems. He is additionally on the Board of Advisors of the Secure World Foundation, a not-for-profit advocacy and think tank for sustainable space. Major General Armor retired from the USAF in 2008, where his last position was as director of the National Security Space Office (NSSO) in the Office of the Under Secretary of the Air Force, Washington, D.C. While there he was responsible for coordinating all defense and intelligence space activities. Prior to the NSSO, he was director, signals intelligence systems acquisition and operations at the National Reconnaissance Office, vice commander of the Warner Robins Air Logistics Center at Robins AFB, and program director of the NAVSTAR GPS at Los Angeles AFB. He earlier served as a combat crew missile launch officer, a laser signal intelligence analyst, and a satellite launch system integrator. In addi - tion, he was selected and qualified as a DOD space shuttle payload specialist, and was first to study information warfare while a research fellow at the National War College. He is an associate fellow of AIAA. He recently was a member of two NRC committees, Rationale and Goals for U.S. Civil Space Program, and AF Scientific, Techni - cal, Engineering and Math (STEM) Workforce Needs; and a reader in a third, Defending Planet Earth: Near-Earth Object Surveys and Hazard Mitigation Strategies. EDWARD F. CRAWLEY is the Ford Professor of Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and is a professor of aeronautics and astronautics and of engineering systems. He received an S.B., S.M., and Sc.D. in aerospace engineering from MIT. He was a founder of the Systems Design and Management Program at MIT, and has served as the department head of aeronautics and astronautics at MIT, the executive director of the Cambridge – MIT Institute, and currently serves as the director of the Bernard M. Gordon – MIT Engineering Leadership Program. His research focuses on the domain of architecture, design, and decision support in complex technical systems that involve economic and stakeholder issues. His current domains of architectural research include energy systems, Earth observation and human spaceflight. Dr. Crawley is a fellow of the AIAA and the Royal Aeronautical Society and is a member of three national academies of engineering, in Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the NAE in the United States. He has served as chair of the NASA Technology and Commercializa - tion Advisory Committee, and was a member of the 1993 Presidential Advisory Committee on the Space Station Redesign, and the 2009 U.S. Human Spaceflight Plans (Augustine) Committee. He recently co-chaired the NRC committee reviewing the NASA Exploration Technology Development Program. He was a visiting lecturer at the Moscow Aviation Institute, and is a guest professor at Tsinghua University in Beijing. He was a finalist in the NASA astronaut selection in 1980. In 2004 he received the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award of the Boy Scouts of America. He has founded three entrepreneurial companies and currently sits on several corporate boards. RAVI B. DEO is founder and principal of EMBR, an aerospace engineering and technology services company specializing in strategic planning, business development, program management and structural engineering. Dr. Deo formerly served as the director, technology, space systems market segment at Northrop Grumman Corporation’s Integrated Systems Sector. He has worked as a program and functional manager for government-sponsored proj - ects on cryotanks, integrated airplane and space vehicle systems health management, and structures and materials, thermal protection systems, and software development. He has extensive experience in road mapping technolo - gies, program planning, technical program execution, scheduling, budgeting, proposal preparation, and business management of technology development contracts. Among his significant accomplishments are the NASA-funded Space Launch Initiative, Next Generation Launch Technology, Orbital Space Plane, and High Speed Research programs, where he was responsible for the development of multidisciplinary technologies. Dr. Deo is the author

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334 NASA SPACE TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPS AND PRIORITIES of more than 50 technical publications and is the editor of one book. He served on the NRC Panel C: Structures and Materials of the Steering Committee on Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics and Panel J: High-Energy Power and Propulsion and In-space Transportation of the Committee for the Review of NASA’s Capability Roadmaps. He has also served on the Scientific Advisory Board to the Air Force Research Laboratory. WALT FAULCONER is president of Strategic Space Solutions, LLC, an aerospace consulting company that he started in 2010 to advise NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, DOD, and commercial companies on strategic planning, business development, systems engineering, and management. Previously, he was the business area executive for civilian space at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), responsible for all of the NASA missions at APL, including MESSENGER, the first orbiter of Mercury; New Horizons, the first mission to Pluto; and STEREO, the twin spacecraft investigating coronal mass ejections from the Sun. Prior to joining APL, Mr. Faulconer was with Lockheed Martin for 26 years and served in a variety positions, including director for strategic planning for the Space Systems Company, business development director for human spaceflight and space transportation, and project manager for advanced technology space transporta - tion programs including the X-33 Military Spaceplane and the Crew the Transfer Vehicle program. He served as a systems engineer and mission operations lead on the Space Shuttle program and a variety of classified space programs. He has a master’s degree in systems management from the University of Southern California and a bachelor’s degree in space science from the Florida Institute of Technology. PHILIP D. HATTIS holds the position of laboratory technical staff at the Draper Laboratory (the laboratory’s highest technical position), with 36 years of aerospace system design, development, integration and test experi - ence. His responsibilities have included technical leadership roles for small and large projects requiring challeng - ing Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) and avionics system development, including responsibility for assuring robust, integrated GN&C/avionics fault management capabilities. His GN&C/avionics technical leader- ship has been applied to the space shuttle, the International Space Station, the Orion spacecraft, advanced Earth observation systems, autonomous air and spaceflight systems, uncrewed aerial vehicles, reusable launch vehicles, hypersonic vehicles, precision Mars landing systems, ballistic missile defense systems, precision delivery airdrop systems, ground warrior systems, and helicopter fire control systems. He has served on and led major program red team reviews for NASA, other government agencies, and for aerospace contractors. He is a lifetime fellow and past board member of the AIAA, as well as a past AIAA vice president for public policy. He is a recipient of the Draper Distinguished Performance Award, the AIAA Distinguished Service Award, and NASA recognition for his contributions to the STS-1 and STS-8 missions. He received his Ph.D. from MIT and has served as thesis advisor to numerous MIT graduate students and is an occasional technical and technology policy lecturer at MIT. TAMARA E. JERNIGAN currently serves as the deputy principal associate director for the Weapons and Complex Integration (WCI) and principal associate directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). WCI is responsible for ensuring the safety, reliability, and security of the U.S. nuclear stockpile in the absence of test - ing through a comprehensive science-based program. Dr. Jernigan initially joined LLNL as the principal deputy associate director for the Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate and later became the associate director for strategic human capital management. Prior to joining LLNL, Dr. Jernigan was selected as a NASA astronaut in 1985. She is a veteran of five Space Shuttle missions where she supervised the pre-flight planning and in-flight execution of critical activities aboard STS-40, 52, 67, 80, and 96. On STS-67, Dr. Jernigan served as payload commander where the crew conducted continuous ultraviolet observations of a variety of stars, planets, and distant galaxies. During Dr. Jernigan’s last flight, STS-96, the crew performed the first docking to the International Space Station and Dr. Jernigan executed a spacewalk of nearly eight hours to attach equipment to the exterior of the station. Dr. Jernigan is the recipient of numerous awards including Outstanding Woman of the Year in Science for Alameda County (2004), the NASA Distinguished Service Medal (2000), the Lowell Thomas Award, Explorer’s Club (2000), five NASA Space Flight Medals (2000, 1996, 1995, 1992, 1991), the NASA Distinguished Service Medal (1997), the NASA Group Achievement Award—EVA Developmental Test Team (1997), the Federation Aeronautique Internationale Vladimir Komorov Diploma (1997 and 1996), the NASA Outstanding Leadership

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335 APPENDIX R Medal (1996), the NASA Outstanding Performance Award (1993), the NASA Exceptional Service Medal (1993), and the Laurels Award, Aviation Week (1991). Dr. Jernigan earned her Ph.D. in space physics at Rice University. She has served as a member of the Space Studies Board, and on the Committee on the Scientific Context for Space Exploration. JOHN C. KARAS is vice president and general manager for human spaceflight for Lockheed Martin Space Sys - tems Company where he is responsible for coordinating the corporation’s capabilities and assets for human space exploration. This includes space shuttle operations on the company’s external tank program, and he serves on the advisory board of United Space Alliance. Likewise, exploration programs such as the Orion multi-purpose crew vehicle are under his direction. Previously, he served as vice president of business development and was respon - sible for strategic planning, advanced technology concepts. Mr. Karas was also director of the Advanced Space Systems and Technology Department, where he was responsible for management of operations research, system predesign, and technology development. Under his direction, the department focused on structures and propul - sion technologies, including single stage to orbit and national aerospace plane cryogenic systems and contracted R&D. Mr. Karas also served as manager of Advanced Avionics Systems, the group responsible for new technology demonstration. These new technologies included developments such as adaptive GN&C, multiple fault-tolerant controls, a totally electric vehicle using electromechanical actuators and artificial intelligence. Mr. Karas earned his B.S. in electrical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and has taken advanced course work toward a master’s degree in engineering and a master’s degree in business administration. Mr. Karas has not served on any previous National Academies studies. JOHN M. KLINEBERG is the former CEO of Swales Aerospace and retired president of Space Systems/Loral (SS/L). Before assuming the presidency of SS/L, Dr. Klineberg served as executive vice president for Loral’s Globalstar program where he successfully led the development, production, and deployment of the Globalstar satellite constellation for cellular telephone services. Prior to joining Loral in 1995, Dr. Klineberg spent 25 years at NASA where he served in a variety of management and technical positions. He was the director of the God - dard Space Flight Center, director of the Lewis (now Glenn) Research Center, deputy associate administrator for aeronautics and space technology at NASA Headquarters, and a research scientist at the Ames Research Center. Before beginning his career at NASA, he conducted fundamental studies in fluid dynamics at the California Insti - tute of Technology (Caltech) and worked at the Douglas Aircraft Company and the Grumman Aircraft Company. Dr. Klineberg has a B.S. in engineering from Princeton University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Caltech. He is the vice chair of the NRC Space Studies Board, the former chair of two NRC study committees, including the Committee to Review the NASA Astrobiology Institute, a former member of two other NRC committees, and a former member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. IVETT A. LEYVA is a senior aerospace engineer in the Aerophysics Branch of the Space and Missile Propulsion Division of the Air Force Research Laboratory, where she focuses on the design of liquid rocket engines. Dr. Leyva is an experimentalist and currently studies the effects of acoustic fields on liquid rocket injectors and also works in the area of hypersonic boundary layer transition. Previously, she was a senior aerodynamicist at Microcosm, Inc., where she was responsible for the development of ablative chambers and also performed numerical/ analytical studies of Microcosm’s launch vehicles’ subcomponents. Prior to Microcosm she was employed at General Electric’s Global Research Center where she led the design, development, and testing of several pulse detonation concepts and coordinated joint projects with scientists from the former Soviet Union. Dr. Leyva holds several patents in the United States and Europe in the area of propulsion. She received her Ph. D. in aeronautics from Caltech. She served on the Committee to Review NASA’s Exploration Technology Development Programs, the Committee on Air Force/Department of Defense Aerospace Propulsion, and the Steering Committee on Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics. She currently serves on the Aeronautics and Engineering Board.

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336 NASA SPACE TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPS AND PRIORITIES LESTER L. LYLES is a general in the U.S. Air Force (retired). While on active duty, his assignments included program director of the medium-launch vehicles program and space-launch systems offices during the recovery from the Challenger Space Shuttle accident, vice commander and commander of Ogden Air Logistics Center, com - mander of the Space and Missile Systems Center, director of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization, vice chief of staff at Headquarters USAF, and commander, Air Force Materiel Command. General Lyles currently serves on the board of directors for several corporations, including General Dynamics Corp., Dayton Power & Light, KBR Corp., Precision CastParts Corp., Battelle Laboratories, and United Service Automobile Association (USAA). He has received many awards and decorations including the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, the Distinguished Service Medal, the Defense Superior Service Medal, and the Legion of Merit with oak leaf cluster. He was named Astronautics Engineer of the Year by the National Space Club in 1990 and received the Roy Wilkins Renown Service Award for outstanding contributions to military equal opportunity policies and programs from the NAACP in 1994. General Lyles is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. In 2003, was named Black Engineer of the Year/Lifetime Achievement and he received an Honorary Doctorate from New Mexico State University. General Lyles also has a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Howard University and an M.S. in mechanical/ nuclear engineering from New Mexico State University. He is a graduate of the Defense Systems Management College, the Armed Forces Staff College, the National War College, and the National and International Security Management Course at Harvard University. General Lyles served on the Augustine Space Committee in 2009, developing the agenda for the Human Space Flight missions of NASA. He also chaired the NRC’s “Roles and Rationale Study of the U.S. Civil Space Programs.” General Lyles serves on the Defense Science Board and the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board. H. JAY MELOSH is a Distinguished Professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Physics, and Aerospace Engineering at Purdue University. Dr. Melosh’s previous positions include professor of planetary sciences at the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, associate professor of planetary science at Caltech, and associate professor of geophysics at State University of New York. He has made many important contributions to Earth and planetary sciences, including definitive studies of the collisional origin of the Moon and the process of impact cratering. His other major contributions include acoustic fluidization, dynamic topography, and planetary tectonics. He is active in astrobiological studies relating chiefly to microorganism exchange between the terres - trial planets. Dr. Melosh is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He received his A.B. in physics from Princeton University and his Ph.D. in physics and geology from Caltech. Dr. Melosh has served on the Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration and on both the Steering Committee and the Mitigation Panel for the Review of Near-Earth Object Surveys and Hazard Mitigation Strategies. DANIEL R. MULVILLE is an independent consultant in aerospace systems, engineering, and management. He has led a number of technical reviews for NASA including the recent Near Earth Object Study and Lunar Robotics Architecture Study. He also led technical and management studies of the National Polar-Orbiting Operational Envi- ronmental Satellite System (NPOESS), N-Prime and DAWN programs, and served on the team assessing the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s space program. At NASA he was the associate deputy administrator responsible for directing and managing NASA’s daily operations. He also served as NASA’s chief engineer responsible for the overall review of technical readiness and execution of NASA programs and was deputy director of the Materials and Structures Division in the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology. He directed the composites technology program and structures elements of the advanced launch systems program. Prior to his employment with NASA he served as the structures technology manager for the Naval Air Systems Command and directed the structures research, technology and exploratory development for Navy aircraft and air-launched missile systems. He led the composites fuselage and empennage development for the AV-8B and propulsion structures for the F/A-18. He was a program manager for structures research at the Office of Naval Research and a research engineer at the Naval Research Laboratory developing design and failure analysis methods. Dan Mulville has been awarded NASA’s Distinguished Service Medal and Outstanding Leadership Medal and research publication awards by NRL. He received his Ph.D. in structural mechanics from Catholic University. Dr. Mulville has not served on any previous National Academies studies.

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337 APPENDIX R DAVA J. NEWMAN is a professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems at MIT and affiliate faculty in the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology Program. Dr. Newman is also a MacVicar Faculty Fellow and director of the Technology and Policy Program at MIT. She specializes in investi - gating human performance across the spectrum of gravity. She is an expert in the areas of extravehicular activity (EVA), human movement, physics-based modeling, biomechanics, energetics, and human-robotic cooperation. Dr. Newman’s finite element modeling work provided NASA the first three-dimensional representation of bone loss and loading applicable for long-duration missions. She has an active research program in advanced EVA includ - ing advanced space suit design, human-robotic cooperation, and biomedical devices. Dr. Newman also focuses on engineering education involving active learning, hands-on design, and information technology implementation to enhance student learning. She was named one of the Best Inventors of 2007 for her BioSuit™ system by Time magazine. Dr. Newman received a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Notre Dame, master’s degrees in aeronautics and astronautics and technology and policy from MIT, and a Ph.D. in aerospace biomedical engineering from MIT. She is a former member of the NRC Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board and has served on numerous NRC study committees. RICHARD R. PAUL is an independent consultant with 40 years of R&D-related management experience. Major General Paul retired from the USAF in 2000 after 33 years of service and retired from the Boeing Company in 2007 after 7 years of service. He served as a vice president in Boeing’s centralized research and technology organization that develops advanced technologies for Boeing’s family of commercial aircraft and defense-related aerospace products. In that assignment, he led the organization’s strategic development and modeling and simu - lation activities, and was the executive manager of Boeing’s 2,000-person technical fellowship. During his Air Force career, Major General Paul served in three Air Force laboratories, a product center, two major command headquarters, USAF Headquarters in the Pentagon, and a joint staff assignment. His latter three jobs were aligned with the Air Force science and technology enterprise, where he served in his final assignment as the commander of the Air Force Research Laboratory. Major General Paul is currently a member of the Air Force’s Air University Board of Visitors, the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Army Science and Technology, the National Science Foundation Small Business Innovation Research Advisory Committee, and the Wright State University Research Institute Advisory Board. He is a former chair of the Industrial Research Institute (a consortium of 200 companies conducting R&D) and a former advisor to the Sandia National Laboratories Board of Directors Missions Committee. Major General Paul has served on several NRC committees, including the Committee on the Role and Scope of Mission-Enabling Activities in NASA’s Space and Earth Science Missions, the Steering Committee of the NASA Technology Roadmaps, and the Committee on Making the Soldier Decisive on Future Battlefields. LISELOTTE J. SCHIOLER is responsible for research program development for new non-NASA Langley Research Center clients at the National Institute of Aerospace (NIA). She has almost 30 years of experience in fundamental research, as well as program and proposal development, proposal consulting, and program management. Prior to her employment at NIA, she worked for the federal government as a researcher in high-temperature structural ceramics (U.S. Army) and as a program manager for ceramics/high-temperature materials (USAF Office of Sci - entific Research and the National Science Foundation [NSF]), as well as at a large aerospace company, a small hi-tech business, and herself, running a consulting company. She has participated on many advisory committees, including for DOE and NASA, as well as running review panels for proposals submitted to the NASA Micrograv - ity Materials Program. Dr. Schioler is a fellow of the American Ceramic Society and has held several editorial positions for their publications. She holds a Sc.D. in ceramic science from MIT. GERALD SCHUBERT is a professor in the Department of Earth and Space at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Schubert’s research interests include theoretical studies of the internal structures of the giant planets and their major satellites. He also studies the interiors of the terrestrial planets and the atmospheres of Venus and the outer planets. He has been associated with many spacecraft missions: interdisciplinary scientist and co- investigator for the Atmospheric Structure Experiment on Galileo; member of the Magellan Radar Investigation Group; interdisciplinary scientist for Pioneer Venus; co-investigator for Apollo 16’s Lunar Surface Magnetometer;

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338 NASA SPACE TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPS AND PRIORITIES and co-investigator for Apollo 15 and 16’s subsatellite magnetometers. Dr. Schubert has served as a member of the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics Management Operations Working Group; the Lunar and Planetary Geoscience Review Panel and Geophysics Group Chief; and the Planetary Atmospheres Review Panel and Dynam- ics Group Chief (1995). He received his B.E.P and M.A.E. in engineering physics and aeronautical engineering from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in engineering and aeronautical sciences from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Schubert is a member of the NAS. He previously served on the NRC Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration, the 2002 solar system decadal survey New Frontiers in Solar System Exploration, the Commit - tee on New Opportunities in Solar System Exploration, and the Planetary Science Decadal Survey (Satellites Panel). PROPULSION AND POWER PANEL JOHN R. ROGACKI, Chair, is associate director of the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC). Prior to joining IHMC, Dr. Rogacki served as director of the University of Florida’s Research and Engi - neering Education Facility (REEF), a unique educational facility in Northwest Florida supporting U.S. Air Force research and education needs through graduate degree programs in mechanical, aerospace, electrical, computer, industrial, and systems engineering. Under Dr. Rogacki’s leadership, the REEF grew into a highly capable and internationally respected research and education facility. Among his past experiences, Dr. Rogacki has served as: NASA’s deputy associate administrator for space transportation technology (in charge of the Space Launch Initia - tive); program director for the Orbital Space Plane and Next Generation Launch Technology Programs; co-chair of the NASA/DOD Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technology Program; director of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center’s Space Transportation Directorate; director of the Propulsion and Power Directorate for the USAF Research Laboratory; director of the USAF Phillips Laboratory Space and Rocket Propulsion Directorate; and deputy director of the Flight Dynamics Directorate of the USAF Wright Laboratory. He has served as pri - mary NASA liaison for the National Aerospace Initiative; co-chair, DOD Future Propulsion Technology Advisory Group; co-chair, DOD Ground and Sea Vehicles Technology Area Readiness Assessment Panel; member of the National High Cycle Fatigue Coordinating Committee; and senior NASA representative to the Joint Aeronautical Commanders Group. He was associate professor of engineering mechanics (and chief of the Materials Division) at the USAF Academy. In 2005, he graduated from the Senior Executives Program in National and International Security at Harvard’s JFK School of Government. An accomplished pilot, Rogacki has logged over 3300 flying hours as pilot, instructor pilot, and flight examiner in aircraft ranging from motorized gliders to heavy bombers. Dr. Rogacki earned his Ph.D. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Washington, and his B.S. in engineering mechanics from the U.S. Air Force Academy. DOUGLAS M. ALLEN is an independent consultant. Mr. Allen has 30 years of experience in advanced aero - space technology research, development, and testing. He is an expert in space power technology, achievements include leading the successful first flight of multi-junction solar cells, leading the successful first flight of modular concentrator solar arrays, teaching AIAA’s Space Power Systems Design short course, leading development of high specific energy batteries, managing development of nuclear space power systems, and leading development of solar power systems designed to survive hostile threats. He was awarded AIAA’s “Aerospace Power Systems Award” for outstanding career achievements. Previously, Mr. Allen worked for the Schafer Corporation from 1992 through 2010. He led multiple modeling and simulation efforts including development of SPECTTRA for AFRL’s Space Vehicles Directorate to model satellite power systems and to perform technology trades to show payoffs of advanced technologies at the system level when applied to specific satellite systems. Mr. Allen was Schafer’s chief engineer for a NASA contract that included developing a concept for Moon and Mars exploration and conceptual design of a Crew Exploration Vehicle. Prior to that, Mr. Allen managed launch vehicle and power technology programs for the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization in the Pentagon. Mr. Allen received his M.S. in mechanical engineering/energy conversion in 1982 and his B.S. in mechanical engineering in 1980 from the University of Dayton. His previous NRC membership service includes the Committee on Radioisotope Power Systems Project and the Committee on Thermionic Research and Technology.

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339 APPENDIX R HENRY W. BRANDHORST, JR., is president and chief technology officer of Carbon-Free Energy, LLC and is a visiting professor at Auburn University, charged with developing a Nuclear Power Engineering minor course of study for the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering. Dr. Brandhorst retired as director of the space research institute at Auburn University in June 2010 and as chief of the power technology division at the NASA Lewis Research Center in 1996. He has developed lightweight, high efficiency solar cells for space missions, advanced lightweight solar array technologies as well as Stirling and Brayton Dynamic space (as well as for terrestrial) power systems. He participated in the first flight of a concentrating photovoltaic power system on Deep Space 1. He has demonstrated “direct drive” solar electric propulsion with a terrestrial concentrator solar array. Dr. Brandhorst has been involved with the ASRG Stirling radioisotope power generating system and the development of a 5 kW free-piston Stirling convertor for a fission surface power system. He has been awarded several NASA medals for Exceptional Engineering Achievement and Outstanding Leadership. He received his Ph.D. in nuclear chemistry in 1961 from Purdue University. Dr. Brandhorst was a member on the NRC Committee on Review of the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts. DAVID E. CROW is retired senior vice president of engineering at Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Engine Company and professor emeritus of mechanical engineering at the University of Connecticut. At Pratt and Whitney he was influential in the design, development, test, and manufacturing in support of a full line of engines for aerospace and industrial applications. He was involved with products that include high-thrust turbofans for large commercial and military aircraft; turboprops and small turbofans for regional and corporate aircraft and helicopters; booster engines and upper stage propulsion systems for advanced launch vehicles; turbopumps for the Space Shuttle; and industrial engines for land-based power generation. His involvement included sophisticated computer modeling and standard work to bring constant improvements in the performance and reliability of the company’s products, while at the same time reducing noise and emissions. Dr. Crow is a member of the NAE. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering in 1972 from the University of Missouri-Rolla, his M.S. in mechanical engineering in 1970 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and his B.S. in mechanical engineering in 1966 from University of Missouri-Rolla. Dr. Crow’s current NRC service includes chair of the Panel on Air and Ground Vehicle Technol - ogy–2011 (member in 2009), as a member on the Committee on Examination of the U.S. Air Force’s Aircraft Sustainment Needs in the Future and its Strategy to Meet Those Needs, the Army Research Laboratory Techni - cal Assessment Board, and the Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. His previous service includes vice chair of the Aerospace Engineering Peer Committee and membership on the Committee for the Review of Proposals to the 2009 Engineering and Physical Science Research and Commercialization Program (ERCP) of the Ohio Third Frontier Program, the Panel on Air and Ground Vehicle Technology–2007, the Committee for the Evaluation of NASA’s Fundamental Aeronautics Research Program, the Committee on Analysis of Air Force Engine Efficiency Improvement Options for Large Non-Fighter Aircraft, the Committee on Air Force/Depart - ment of Defense Aerospace Propulsion, the Panel B: Propulsion and Power, the 2005 NAS Award in Aeronautical Engineering Selection Committee, the NAS Award in Aeronautical Engineering Selection Committee, and the Aerospace Engineering Peer Committee. ALEC D. GALLIMORE is an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Michigan where he directs the Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory. Dr. Gallimore is also the associate dean for research and graduate education in Michigan’s College of Engineering. His primary research interests include electric propulsion and plasma diagnostics. He has experience with a wide array of electric propulsion technologies including Hall thrusters, ion thrusters, arcjets, RF plasma sources, 100-kW-class steady MPD thrusters, and MW-level quasi-steady MPD thrusters. Dr. Gallimore has implemented a variety of probe, microwave, and optical/laser plasma diagnostics and is the author of over 280 journal and conference papers on electric propulsion and plasma physics. He has graduated 30 Ph.D. students and 12 M.S. students. He serves on the AIAA Electric Propulsion Technical Committee and is a fellow of AIAA. Dr. Gallimore is an associate editor for the Journal of Propulsion and Power and for the JANNAF Journal (propulsion). He received his B.S. in aeronautical engineering from Rensselaer, and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in aerospace engineering from Princeton. Dr. Gallimore’s current NRC service includes membership on the Committee on an Assessment

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340 NASA SPACE TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPS AND PRIORITIES of Concepts and Systems for U.S. Boost-Phase Missile Defense in Comparison to Other Alternatives and previ - ous membership on the Committee on Conventional Prompt Global Strike Capability, the Committee on Directed Energy Technology for Countering Indirect Weapons, the Committee on Future Air Force Needs for Survivability, the Panel on Engineering, the Panel J: High-Energy Power and Propulsion and In-space Transportation, the Com - mittee on Technology for Human/Robotic Exploration and Development of Space, and the Committee for Undersea Weapons Science and Technology. MARK W. HENLEY is a senior engineer and program manager at Boeing Research and Technology, in advanced technology concepts for future space transportation and energy systems. His most recent energy-related work at Boeing has focused on new technology for use on Earth, But his background includes applications of solar, thermal, chemical, and nuclear energy sources in orbit and on the moon (and Mars). Mr. Henley managed Boeing’s Space Solar Power studies for NASA in 1998 through 2005, coordinating a dozen interrelated research contracts. He also served as principal investigator to demonstrate laser-photovoltaic power transmission technology that could enable operations in the permanently shadowed craters near the moon’s South Pole, where ice resources have recently been discovered. Mr. Henley previously managed advanced programs at Rockwell, evaluating commercialization of space launch systems from the former Soviet Union, studying an “Inspector” sub-satellite for the International Space Station and leading cryogenic upper stage design activities. Prior to Boeing/Rockwell, he spent over 10 years at General Dynamics, planning and developing Atlas commercial launch systems, and performing advanced space research and technology studies. He began his career at the California Space Institute, part of the University of California. Mr. Henley received his B.A. in physics in 1982 and his M.S. in aerospace engineering in 1988, both from the University of California, San Diego. ANTHONY K. HYDER is a professor of physics at the University of Notre Dame. Dr. Hyder’s research is in the interaction of spacecraft with the space environment. He is also a member of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics. His recent work has focused on the design of spacecraft systems, especially the electrical power and thermal management subsystems, and on the operation of high sensitivity IR sensors aboard spacecraft. He has continued work also in the physics of high-brightness particle accelerators. He has served on a number of national and international panels and advisory boards including the NATO Sensors panel, the Defense Intelligence Agency Scientific Advisory Board, the Advisory Board for the Missile Defense Agency, and the Army Science Board. Dr. Hyder is nominated for his background in military weapons systems development, electronics, sen - sors, non-lethal weapons, WMD, space systems, and data fusion. Dr. Hyder received his B.S. in physics for the University of Notre Dame, his M.S. in space physics and Ph.D. in nuclear physics from the Air Force Institute of Technology. He received the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) Distinguished Alumnus title in 2005. He has extensive NRC membership service including the Committee on Forecasting Future Disruptive Technologies, the Committee on Research, Development, and Acquisition Options for U.S. Special Operations Command, the Panel on Engineering, the Panel on Enabling Concepts and Technologies, the Committee for Materials, Structures, and Aeronautics for Advanced Uninhabited Air Vehicles, and the Committee on the TOPAZ International Program. IVETT A. LEYVA. See the steering committee listing above. PAULO C. LOZANO is the H.N. Slater Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His main interests are plasma physics, space propulsion, ion beam physics, small satellites, and nanotechnology. Part of Dr. Lozano’s research portfolio includes the development of highly efficient and compact ion propulsion systems for pico/nano-satellites. In 2007, he received MIT’s Karl Chang Innovation award for his work in electrochemical microfabrication on porous metals. In 2008 he received the Young Investiga - tor Program Award from the U.S. Air Force for his work on micro-propulsion and in 2011 received the Future Mind award from the Quo science magazine and the Discovery Channel. He has received the Outstanding Faculty UROP Mentor Award for his contributions to the research experience of undergraduate students at MIT. Dr. Lozano has published three patents and over 60 conference and journal publications. He teaches subjects in space and rocket propulsion, fluid mechanics, and plasma physics. Dr. Lozano is a senior member of the AIAA and the American

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341 APPENDIX R Physical Society. He earned his M.S. and Ph.D. in space propulsion from MIT. Dr. Lozano’s previous NRC service includes membership on the Mitigation Panel. JOYCE A. McDEVITT is an independent consultant of systems safety. Currently she is a member of NASA’s Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel and recently served as project safety engineer for JHU/APL’s project to develop and launch the Pluto-New Horizons spacecraft. Mrs. McDevitt previously served as a program manager with Futron Corporation and Computer Sciences Corporation, where she furnished range safety and system safety support to government and commercial clients and held project safety responsibilities for JHU/APL’s Midcourse Space Experiment spacecraft. She led a team to provide support to the Commercial Space Transportation Licensing and Safety Division of the Federal Aviation Administration. During her nearly 30 years of civil service at NASA Head - quarters, the Air Force Systems Command, and the Naval Ordnance Station, Mrs. McDevitt acquired and applied safety expertise in space, aeronautical, facility, and weapons systems and in propellant, explosive, and chemical processes. She is a registered professional engineer in safety engineering and a senior member of the International System Safety Society. She earned a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of New Hampshire and an M.S. in engineering from Catholic University. Her previous NRC membership service includes the Committee on Space Launch Range Safety and the Committee on Assessing Passenger Submersible Safety. ROGER M. MYERS is the deputy lead for the space and launch systems business unit and executive director, electric propulsion and integrated systems for Aerojet General Corporation, providing strategy, program manage - ment, and business management oversight for Aerojet’s space systems. Prior to this appointment, Dr. Myers was the general manager of Aerojet, Redmond Operations, a 430-person organization focused on in-space propulsion. As the executive director of electric propulsion and integrated systems department at the Redmond facility, Dr. Myers leads programs and strategic planning for advanced spacecraft systems development. Prior to this appointment he served as the executive director, systems and technology development, focused on the development, qualification, and first-article flight production of leading-edge chemical and electric in-space propulsion systems for Aerojet. Prior to joining Aerojet Redmond Operations (then Olin Aerospace) in 1996 as the director, electric propulsion. Dr. Myers held various supervisory and research positions at the NASA Glenn Research Center (then the NASA Lewis Research Center) and Princeton University. Dr. Myers earned his Ph.D. in mechanical and aerospace engineering at Princeton University and a B.S. in aerospace engineering, summa cum laude, from the University of Michigan. His previous NRC membership service includes the Panel to Review Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Proposals in Propulsion–2005 and Panel J: High-Energy Power and Propulsion and In-space Transportation. LAWRENCE J. ROSS is the chief executive officer for Aerospace Engineering Associates, LLC. In this role he has performed technical studies of aerospace related issues for the purpose of formulating strategic plans and investment strategies. Mr. Ross examines and makes recommendations with respect to specific organizational and management problems being encountered by a client organization and provides assistance in proposal formulation and conducting due diligence reviews. He has assessed the launch readiness of launch vehicles, assessing the state and viability of specific aerospace projects. In January 2007, he co-founded the Aerospace Engineering Associ - ates, LLC. Mr. Ross was the director of the NASA Wind Tunnel Program Office from 1994 to 1995. This was an ad hoc assignment reporting to the administrator of NASA to set up, organize, and direct a task force responsible for planning a proposed $2.5B National Wind Tunnel Complex. From 1963 through 1994, he held the roles of director, deputy director, and space director at NASA’s Lewis Research Center, a $1 billion operation responsible for delivering a diverse product line of research, technology, and systems development for the nation’s space and aeronautical undertakings. He was the chairman of the Delta Rocket #178 Flight Accident Review Board, an ad hoc assignment to organize and manage an in-depth investigation into the cause of the flight failure and to formu - late a set of corrective actions to preclude future flight failures. In addition, he held various positions at the Lewis Research Center associated with the development and launch of Titan and Atlas based launch vehicles including assignments as design engineer, project engineer, chief engineer, and project manager. He earned his B.E.E. from Manhattan College in 1963 and completed the Harvard Senior Managers Program in 1991.

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342 NASA SPACE TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPS AND PRIORITIES RAYMOND J. SEDWICK is an associate professor of aerospace engineering and director of the Space Power and Propulsion Laboratory in the A. James Clark College of Engineering at the University of Maryland (UM) where he has been since 2007. Prior to this appointment, Dr. Sedwick was a principal research scientist and associate director of the MIT Space Systems Laboratory in the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics for a period of 10 years. At UM, Dr. Sedwick’s current research includes RF plasma sources for space propulsion, plasma-assisted combustion, long-range resonant inductive power transfer, and novel fusion confinement for space and terrestrial power applications. His research interests include most forms of in-space power generation and propulsion with particular interest in nuclear systems and the applications of plasmas. Dr. Sedwick was the inaugural recipient of the Bepi Colombo Prize, as well as the recipient of an NSF CAREER award on the development of compact helicon sources. He is an associate fellow of the AIAA and serves on the Nuclear and Future Flight Technical Committee. Dr. Sedwick earned his B.S. in aerospace engineering at Pennsylvania State University, his S.M. and Ph.D. in 1994 and 1997, respectively, in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT. GEORGE F. SOWERS is vice president of business development and advanced programs for United Launch Alli - ance (ULA) headquartered in Denver, Colorado. He is responsible for strategic planning, advanced technology development, advanced concept development and new business acquisition efforts. Before joining ULA, Dr. Sowers was director of business development & advanced programs for Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Space Transportation line of business located in Denver, Colorado. Dr. Sowers previously served as director of Mission Integration for the Atlas launch vehicle program. In this role, he was responsible for all activities to integrate and fly satellites on Atlas launch vehicles. This included interface requirements development, mission design, dynamics and systems analysis and flight software development. Prior to this assignment, Dr. Sowers was the chief systems engineer and director of the Systems Engineering and Integration Team (SEIT) for the Atlas V development pro - gram. This group was responsible for systems requirements development and verification, systems test, systems integration, and systems analysis. Dr. Sowers served on the Atlas V development program from near its inception through the first flight in 2002. Dr. Sowers began his career in the aerospace industry with Martin Marietta in 1981 on the Titan program as a flight design engineer. He left the company in 1983 to obtain his Ph.D. Upon his return to Martin Marietta in 1988, Dr. Sowers assumed a number of increasingly responsible positions on the Titan program culminating in the role of deputy chief engineer. Dr. Sowers received his B.S. in physics from Georgia Tech in 1980 and obtained his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Colorado in 1988. ROBOTICS, COMMUNICATIONS, AND NAVIGATION PANEL STEPHEN P. GOREVAN, Chair, is the chairman and co-founder of Honeybee Robotics Spacecraft Mechanisms Corporation of New York. Honeybee is a NASA supplier of advanced robotics research and development engineer- ing as well as a supplier of spacecraft subsystems that range from robotic devices such as the Mars Exploration Rover Rock Abrasion Tool or RAT all the way to deployment devices for spacecraft solar arrays. Mr. Gorevan has guided Honeybee to act as a close industry companion to the planetary science community. This technologi - cal support to the planetary science community has led to the development of robotics devices to be found on the Mars Exploration Rovers, the Phoenix Lander, the Mars Science Laboratory and for future missions to Venus (Honeybee has developed a high temperature motor), a small planetary body (sampling systems), Titan (anchoring systems), and the moon. Mr. Gorevan has also guided Honeybee to support NASA and the DARPA in the use of robotics for on-orbit servicing operations, an ongoing interest. Mr. Gorevan has a B.A. in music from New York University and a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the City College of New York. He has previously served as a member of the NRC Steering Committee for Workshops on Issues of Technology Development for Human and Robotic Exploration and Development of Space. JULIE A. ADAMS is an associate professor of computer science and computer engineering in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Adams directs the Human-Machine Teaming Laboratory. Her research focuses on distributed artificially intelligent algorithms for autonomous multiple robot coalition formation and the development of complex human-machine systems for large human and robotic

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348 NASA SPACE TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPS AND PRIORITIES Lectureship Selection Committee, the Committee for Review of the Science Implementation Plan of the NASA Office of Earth Science, the Committee of Geophysical and Environmental Data, the 1995 Alexander Aggassiz Medal Selection Committee, the 1989 Alexander Aggassiz Medal Selection Committee, the Ocean Studies Board, the Briefing Panel on Earth Viewing Remote Sensing, the Ocean Climate Research Committee, the Ad Hoc Group on Ocean Flux Experiments, and the Space Studies Board. HUMAN HEALTH AND SURFACE EXPLORATION PANEL BONNIE J. DUNBAR, Chair, is an independent aerospace consultant and president of Dunbar International LLC. Prior to establishing her own business, she served 5 years as president and CEO of the Museum of Flight and subsequently was under contract to them for expansion of their space collection, gallery, and STEM education. Dr. Dunbar was a practicing engineer with the Boeing Company (Boeing Computer Services) and the Rockwell International Space Division (Space Shuttle) before she began her extensive career with NASA. She accepted a position as a payload officer/flight controller at the Johnson Space Center for 2 years before she was selected as a NASA astronaut, flying five Space Shuttle flights. She also served two tours in Washington, D.C., as support for the Challenger accident Rogers Commission and then as deputy associate administrator for the Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences at NASA Headquarters. In 1994-1995, Dr. Dunbar trained in Star City, Russia, as a backup crew member for a 3-month flight on the Russian space station, MIR, and was certified by the Russian Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center to fly on long duration MIR space station flights. In 1995 and 1996, she was detailed to the NASA JSC Mission Operations Directorate as assistant director, where she was responsible for chairing the International Space Station Training Readiness Reviews and facilitating Russian-U.S. operations and training strategies. Dr. Dunbar has also served as assistant director of the Johnson Space Center, responsible for university research oversight, and as deputy director for the Biological Sciences and Applications Division, as associate director to the Space and Life Sciences Directorate, responsible for technology integration and risk management. Dr. Dunbar retired from NASA in 2005. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering; a fellow of AIAA, the American Ceramic Society, and the Royal Aeronautical Society; and is an elected correspond - ing member of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. Dr. Dunbar has B.S. and M.S. degrees in ceramic engineering from the University of Washington and a Ph.D. in mechanical/biomedical engineering from the University of Houston. Dr. Dunbar recently served on the Committee on Human Spaceflight Crew Operations, served as co-chair for the NRC Committee to Review NASA’s Exploration Technology Development Programs in 2008, and has served as a member of the Committee on Engineering Education, the Aerospace Engineering Peer Committee, the Bernard M. Gordon Prize, and the Awards Committee. DAVID L. AKIN is an associate professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland, where he is also the director of the Space Systems Laboratory and of the Institute for Dexterous Space Robotics. Dr. Akin’s current research includes space systems design and space human factors, focusing on advanced technologies for human/robot collaborations, as well as integrated robotic systems for space, undersea, and medical rehabilitation. He was also the principal investigator for the Experimental Assembly of Structures in EVA (EASE) flight experiment on STS 61-B, and the ParaShield flight test vehicle with the American Rocket Company. He was a member of the NASA Space Science Advisory Committee, the NASA Independent Review Team for the Mars 2003 Rover mission, and currently serves on the AIAA Space Automation and Robotics Technical Com - mittee. He has served on the NASA Telerobotics and EVA Working Groups and the NASA Advisory Council on the Role of Humans in Geostationary Orbit. He has written over 100 papers on aerospace systems design, EVA, teleoperation, robotics, and space simulation. He received SB, SM, and ScD from the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT. DALLAS G. BIENHOFF is manager of in-space and surface systems for The Boeing Company. At Boeing, Mr. Bienhoff has led contract and IRAD studies on space transportation and space exploration architecture studies, lunar habitats, propellant depots, cislunar transportation systems, and technology demonstration mission concepts. He was also a member of the Space Shuttle main engine development team at Rocketdyne. Programs of note on

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349 APPENDIX R which he has been involved include Boeing Vision for Space Exploration Concept Exploration & Refinement study, Minimum Functionality Habitation Element; Rockwell X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle, X-38 Crew Return Vehicle, Advanced Launch System, and Shuttle-C studies. Mr. Bienhoff was also the Boeing co-lead with NASA for the Russian FGB module on NASA’s International Space Station Russian Integration Team; and participated in several Access to Space studies as contract manager and a member of multiple NASA-industry teams. Mr. Bien - hoff has a M.S. in engineering from California State University, Northridge, and a BSME from Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Florida. ROBERT L. CURBEAM, JR., is the president of the Aerospace and Defense Group of ARES Corporation. This division performs high-end systems engineering, safety and mission assurance, risk management, and program/ project management for numerous NASA centers and several DOD clients. Captain Curbeam, USN (retired), served in various capacities during his active duty service including operational flying as an F-14 radar intercept officer, project manager for the F-14 air-to-ground weapons separation program, and 13 years with NASA. His time with NASA included numerous technical assignments including deputy associate administrator for Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA), director of the Constellation Program S&MA, and service in the Astronaut Corps during which he completed three spaceflights and performed seven spacewalks. He is also a graduate of TOPGUN and the U.S. Navy Test Pilot School. Captain Curbeam received an M.S. in aeronautical engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School. GREGORY J. HARBAUGH is the president and CEO of the Sigma Chi Foundation. In this position he is respon - sible for all business, operations, and strategic elements of the organization. Following work as a space shuttle flight operations engineer and technical manager in Mission Control he was selected as a NASA astronaut in June 1987. He served as a crewmember on four shuttle missions, logging a total of 818 hours in space, including 18 hours 29 minutes performing spacewalks. He then served as manager of the Extravehicular Activity (space walk) Project Office, where he managed advanced spacesuit technology research and development for future planetary (Moon and Mars) missions. Mr. Harbaugh retired from NASA in March 2001. He has an M.S. in physical science from the University of Houston, Clearlake. He served on the NRC Committee on the Assessment of Options for Extending the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Panel on Human Exploration Systems and Mobility and Autonomous Systems and Robotics. TAMARA E. JERNIGAN. See the steering committee listing above. DANIEL R. MASYS is affiliate professor of Biomedical and Health Informatics at the University of Washington, Seattle. Previously he served as professor and chair of the Department of Biomedical Informatics, and professor of Medicine at the University of California San Diego. He served as chief of the International Cancer Research Data Bank of the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, and from 1986 through 1994 was director of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, which is the computer research and development division of the National Library of Medicine. Dr. Masys is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He received his M.D. from The Ohio State University College of Medicine. Dr. Masys is a former member of the Committee to Review NASA’s Exploration Technology Development Programs, the Committee on Aerospace Medicine and Medicine of Extreme Environments, and chaired the Committee on NASA’s Research on Human Health Risks. ERIC E. RICE is the CEO and chairman of ORBITEC (Orbital Technologies Corporation). He has over 44 years of aerospace business experience. He has been leading the development of ORBITEC as an important contribu - tor to the nation’s space program. He led the development of an AIAA position paper related to In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). He is in the process of developing uses for in-situ materials for lunar base infrastructure fabrication and missions, including propellants, gases, materials, life support fluids, composites, ceramics, and concrete. He is also interested in lunar mining, excavation, and lunar dust mitigation. He was the founding chair- man of the AIAA Space Colonization Technical Committee (SCTC) in 2002, where he has advocated work on space resources and initiated formation of a new Space Resources Utilization Technical Committee (SRUTC)

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350 NASA SPACE TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPS AND PRIORITIES through the SCTC. The SCTC also focuses on space tourism, bases, exploration, colonization/settlements, and terraforming. He currently serves as the PI on the Phase 3 Universal Space Launch Vehicle (USLV) project for the USAF/AFRL. He has served as PI for a NASA project dealing with the in situ acquisition and processing of lunar volatile gases. He served as a NIAC Fellow, conducting advanced concept studies including (1) development of lunar water ice/hydrogen recovery system architecture, and (2) advanced system concept for total ISRU-based propulsion and power systems for unmanned and manned Mars exploration. He was the PI for the NASA/MSFC program involving a revolutionary approach to the carbothermal reduction of lunar oxides to produce lunar oxygen. Dr. Rice was also the PI for two ISRU projects funded by NASA/JSC; namely developing reactors to recover water from planetary dust particles and development of a ground-based lunar ice simulator. He also has been involved in lunar and Mars base concept development. In addition, he has completed a NASA/GRC program that demon - strated carbon monoxide/oxygen-based propulsion systems. Dr. Rice has also served as an adjunct professor at the University of Wisconsin, teaching space transportation and propulsion. Dr. Rice is leading industrial activities of the Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium (WSGC) as the associate director of industry programs and serves on the Space Grant Advisory Board. Dr. Rice earned a Ph.D. in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from The Ohio State University. He also holds a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Rice served on the NRC Steering Committee for Workshops on Issues of Technology Development for Human and Robotic Exploration and Development of Space. RONALD E. TURNER is a fellow with Analytic Services Inc. He is an internationally recognized expert in radia - tion risk management for astronauts, particularly in response to solar storms. He is the senior science advisor to the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) program. For nine years he was the ANSER point of contact to the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts (NIAC), an independent institute charged with creating a vision of future space opportunities to lead NASA into the twenty-first century. He was a participating scientist on the Mars Odyssey program. He serves on the Advisory Council to the National Space Biomedical Research Institute Center for Acute Radiation Research. Dr. Turner earned his Ph.D. in physics from the Ohio State University. He has served on several NRC committees; currently he is serving on the NRC Committee on Solar and Space Phys - ics, and he recently served on the Committee for the Evaluation of Radiation Shielding for Space Exploration. MATERIALS PANEL MOOL C. GUPTA, Chair, is a Langley Distinguished Professor and director of NSF I/UCRC Center for Lasers and Plasmas at the University of Virginia. Previously, he was director of the Applied Research Center, program direc - tor for materials science and engineering and a research professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Old Dominion University. He worked at the Research Laboratories of Eastman Kodak Company for 17 years as a senior scientist and group leader. Before joining Kodak he was senior scientist at the Jet Propul - sion Laboratory, Caltech. Dr. Gupta’s research interests include nanomaterials, solar energy, sensors, and photon processing of materials. Other professional activities include Materials Research Society short course instructor for optoelectronic materials, processes, and devices course for over six years; adjunct professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University for over eight years; conference chair for 1996 SPIE Con - ference on Nonlinear Frequency Conversion. He is editor-in-chief for the CRC Handbook of Photonics 1st and 2nd edition. He has over 140 research publications and 26 patents and was inducted in Kodak’s Inventors Gallery. He has been reviewer and principal investigator for many government agencies. He has a Ph.D. in physics from Washington State University. Dr. Gupta was a member of the NRC Committee on the Ohio Third Frontier Program: Proposal and Progress Reviews, Ohio Research Scholars Program. GREGORY R. BOGART is currently a principal member of the technical staff in the Integrated Microdevice Systems Organization of Sandia National Laboratories. Dr. Bogart led the surface design, development, and manufacturing efforts for BioStar, Inc. and delivered the first low-cost, disposable, physician office based, silicon biosensor for infectious diseases. At Lucent Technologies-Bell Laboratories, Dr. Bogart was responsible for deep reactive ion etching and scaling MEMS processes from 6-inch to 8-inch wafers and was the first to deliver large

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351 APPENDIX R area, thin membranes using dry etch techniques. He was also responsible for fabrication of a MEMS-based nano- g accelerometer with displacement sensitivity of 12 fm/ Hertz1/2. Until late 2009, Dr. Bogart was vice president of engineering for Symphony Acoustics, Inc., which designed and manufactured optical based sensors for seismic and audio applications. His research interests include process integration of new materials and techniques to deliver unique micro and nanometer-sized structures along with large-scale manufacturing techniques for producing those structures. Current research involves energy harvesting materials, stamped metamaterials, large-scale photonic and phononic crystal fabrication with unique materials. Dr. Bogart earned his Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado, and has 14 patents. DONALD M. CURRY is a thermal analyst at the Boeing Company, supporting thermal protection system activities. Prior to that Dr. Curry was with the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) from 1963 until his retirement in January 2007. Dr. Curry has 44 years of experience in the areas of entry heating and thermal protection systems starting with the Gemini spacecraft through the space shuttle. He was the subsystem manager of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Leading Edge Structural System (LESS), which consists of the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) wing leading edge, nose cap, chin panel, and forward external plate attachments, responsible for the direction, coordination, techni - cal design, development, testing, analysis, and flight operational support. Dr. Curry was the JSC aeroassist flight experiment (AFE) project area manager (PAM) with responsibility for the AFE Aerobrake structure and thermal protection system (TPS). He participated in the Orbiter return to flight (RTF) program as the Orbiter LESS/RCC NASA Systems Engineer (NSE), responsible for insight and oversight of contractor activities pertaining to the operation and maintenance of the Orbiter LESS. He also served as the JSC technical lead for evaluation of hot structure and ablator TPS for advanced NASA programs. Dr. Curry received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Houston. JOHN R. HOWELL is the Ernest Cockrell, Jr., Memorial Chair Emeritus, Department of Mechanical Engineer - ing at the University of Texas at Austin where he was a faculty member since 1978. He previously taught at the University of Houston and prior to his teaching career was an aerospace technologist at the NASA Lewis (now Glenn) Research Center. His research career has centered on radiative heat transfer. Dr. Howell received his B.S. and M.S. in chemical engineering and his Ph.D. in engineering from the Case Institute of Technology. He is a member of the NAE and a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Science. Dr. Howell served on the NRC Panel on Benchmarking the Research Competitiveness of the U.S. in Mechanical Engineering; the Panel on a Constrained Space Exploration Technology Program; two panels on chemical demilitarization technology and closure planning; and currently serves on the NRC Standing Committee on Chemical Demilitarization. GEORGE A. LESIEUTRE is professor and head of the Department of Aerospace Engineering, and director of the Center for Acoustics and Vibration at Pennsylvania State University. Prior to joining Penn State in 1989, he held positions at SPARTA (Space Technology) and Rockwell International (Satellite Systems). At SPARTA, he developed and performed research programs involving composite materials and structures for precision space applications. At Rockwell, he analyzed and characterized spacecraft structures, including truss sizing optimiza - tion, composite stress analysis, fracture control, design of damping treatments, and control-structure interaction. His present research interests include structural dynamics, passive damping, active structures, and energy harvest - ing; his publications are highly-cited and his research has had an impact on the practice. Dr. Lesieutre served as principal investigator of a number of major DARPA programs in adaptive structures. He is the recipient of the Zarem Educator Award from the AIAA, an AIAA Sustained Service Award, and has received five society best paper awards, as well as an Outstanding Research award from Penn State. He is a fellow of AIAA, and presently serves on the AIAA Board of Directors. He earned a B.S. in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT, and a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from UCLA. Dr. Lesieutre has served on two NRC Panels for the Review of Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Mechanics Research Proposals. LISELOTTE J. SCHIOLER. See the steering committee listing above.

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352 NASA SPACE TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPS AND PRIORITIES ROBERT E. SKELTON is professor emeritus at University of California, San Diego in the Department of Mechani- cal and Aerospace Engineering. As an engineer in Huntsville, he designed control systems for SKYLAB and other spacecraft from 1963-1975. At the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Purdue he developed new theories of model reduction and control design for flexible spacecraft (1975-1977). As professor and endowed chair of UCSD, he founded the current dynamic systems and control program. His technical contributions are described in 5 books and 400 papers and include algorithms for integrating structure and control design, control of flexible structures, optimization of sensor and actuation resources in large-scale systems, and new structural designs that allow integration of control functions (most recent book Tensegrity Systems, 2009). For his interdisciplinary work he received honors from three engineering societies: AIAA (Fellow), IEEE (Fellow) ASCE (co-recipient of the Norman Medal). He received the Senior Scientist award from the JSPS (Japan Society for the Promotion of Sci - ence), a Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the Russell Severance Springer Chair from UCB in 1991, and a letter of appreciation from the NASA director for contributions to Hubble service and repair missions (serving on EIRR panel for 3 Hubble servicing missions). He earned his Ph.D. from UCLA. He served as a member of NRC’s Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board from 1985-1988. GEORGE W. SUTTON is currently retired. He was previously a part-time senior research scientist at Cobham Analytic Solutions/SPARTA where he has been instrumental in providing guidance for and reviews of new concepts for ballistic missile defense and the initiation of advanced systems for advanced sensors and weapons for ballistic missile defense. Prior to joining SPARTA, Inc., Dr. Sutton was a principal engineer with ANSER (a not-for-profit corporation), where he was a member of the SETA team for BMDO for interceptor technology and high-energy lasers. He performed and published original analyses of aero-optical performance of externally cooled windows, uncooled optical dome and window thermal radiance, stresses, and optical aberrations; discrimination capabil - ity of 1-, 2-, and 3-color passive optical and laser measurements; interceptor test bed flight test planning; testing techniques image motion compensation for strap down seekers; performance of various FPAs for target acquisition; and supported the Space Based Laser project. From 1992-1996, he was director of the Washington office and chief scientist for Aero Thermo Technology, Inc. Dr. Sutton was a member of the SETA team for BMDO theater bal - listic missile interceptor technology, concentrating on aerothermochemistry, aero-optics, and structures for BMDO hit-to-kill ballistic missile interceptors. He wrote the original interceptor flyout computer program that included window heating, window emission noise, and target signal-to-noise ratio. He also wrote the original computer program for end-game guidance and control to determine seeker resolution and accuracy effect on miss distance. He has also completed postdoctoral courses in supersonic aerodynamics, boundary layers, turbulence, plasma physics, and program management. Prior to that, he worked at Helionetics on excimer and blue-green lasers for communications. Before that he worked at the Avco-Everett Research Laboratory on gasdynamic lasers (a name he coined) electric carbon dioxide lasers, and excimer lasers. Dr. Sutton modeled laser beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence with molecular absorption and fog/clouds. He also modeled the distortion of laser mirrors due to heat absorbed by the reflective coating, and modeled and performed experiments on material damage. He performed laser systems studies and wavelength optimization including propagation and threat lethality using the statistics of atmospheric turbulence, absorption, and fog. He invented the hypersonic reentry heat protection (ablation) material that was used successfully on ICBM reentry vehicles, the Corona Satellite Recovery Vehicle, and the Mercury manned reentry capsule. Dr. Sutton is a member of the NAE. He was editor-in-chief of the AIAA Journal for almost 30 years, and has received numerous medals and awards. He received a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and physics from Caltech. He previously served as a member of six NRC committees, most recently the Committee on Directed Energy Technology for Countering Indirect Weapons. ENTRY, DESCENT, AND LANDING PANEL TODD J. MOSHER, Chair, is currently the director of design and development for the Dream Chaser, Sierra Nevada Corporation’s (SNC) commercial crew vehicle, which has been awarded two phases of funding in the NASA Commercial Crew Development Program. As such, he is responsible for the design and development of all of the subsystems that constitute the Dream Chaser lifting body space vehicle. Before that he was the director of

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353 APPENDIX R spacecraft business development at SNC, where he helped win the Orbcomm Second Generation program with a satellite order to build 18 satellites with an option for 30 more. He also was the program manager for the Opera - tionally Responsive Space Multi-Mission Space Vehicle. Before working at SNC, Dr. Mosher worked at Lockheed Martin on NASA’s plans to return to the Moon, served as an assistant professor at Utah State University in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, worked at the Aerospace Corporation, taught at the University of California, Los Angeles, and also worked for General Dynamics. He has authored 50 professional publications (journal and conference papers). Dr. Mosher has taught students from around the world and advised several win - ning student competition teams. As an associate fellow he held many leadership positions in the AIAA. He was a finalist in the 2009 NASA astronaut selection. Dr. Mosher has a Ph.D. and an M.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Colorado; an M.S. in systems engineering from the University of Alabama, Huntsville; and a B.S. in aerospace engineering from San Diego State University. He has an extensive NRC membership record, including the Committee on Assessment of NASA Laboratory Capabilities, the Committee to Review NASA’s Exploration Technology Development Programs, the Committee to Review NASA’s Space Communications Program, and the Committee for the Review of NASA’s Pioneering Revolutionary Technology (PRT) Program. JOHN D. ANDERSON, JR. See the steering committee listing above. TYE M. BRADY is a principal member of the technical staff and space systems engineering group leader at Draper Laboratory in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He has worked over the past 22 years on spacecraft instrumentation, design, and integration on a wide variety of space programs including HETE, HETE-II, ASCA, CHANDRA, ASTRO-E, and TACSAT-2. At Draper, he has led the development of a novel, fully successful, on-orbit attitude sensor that marked the first successful operation of a MEMS gyro and Active Pixel Sensor star camera in space. He currently is technical director for lunar landing at Draper developing a next generation landing system capable of safe and highly precise global landing. His research interests include advanced landing systems, GNC instru - mentation, systems engineering process, autonomous systems, and star camera design. In 2009, Mr. Brady was awarded NASA’s Exceptional Public Service Medal for outstanding technical leadership, a prestigious award given to nongovernment employees for exceptional contributions to NASA’s mission. He earned his B.S. in aerospace engineering from Boston University and his S.M. of aeronautics and astronautics from MIT. BASIL HASSAN is manager of the Aerospace Systems Analysis Department in the Integrated Military Systems Center at Sandia National Laboratories. He has been employed at Sandia since 1993 as a senior and principal member of technical staff and as a manager. Previously, he served as manager of the Aerosciences Department and the Computational Thermal and Fluid Mechanics Department, as well as acting senior manager for the Thermal, Fluid, and Aerosciences Group and acting chief of staff to the laboratory president. He has primarily worked in research and development in nonequilibrium computational fluid dynamics with application to aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of high-speed flight vehicles. Dr. Hassan has also worked in ablation for hypersonic reentry vehicles, drag reduction for low-speed ground transportation vehicles, and high-velocity oxygen fuel thermal sprays. He has managed aerosciences research, code development, and analysis, both in the computational and experimental areas, including having responsibility over Sandia’s transonic and hypersonic wind tunnels and its associated diagnostics development. Dr. Hassan is also the lead for the National Nuclear Security Agency Tri- Lab Support Team for the PECOS Center for Hypersonic Re-entry at University of Texas, Austin. He has been an active member in AIAA for more than 26 years and is currently an associate fellow. He has held a variety of leadership positions at AIAA and is currently vice president for technical activities for the AIAA board of directors. Previously he held the position of director-technical for engineering and technology management. Dr. Hassan has extensive knowledge of NASA’s capabilities and facilities and has served on a variety of external review boards for NASA. He has also served on a variety of university educational advisory boards, including the Aerospace Engineering Department at Texas A&M University and the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at New Mexico State University. Dr. Hassan received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in aerospace engineering from North Carolina State University. He served on the NRC Committee on Assessment of NASA Laboratory Capabilities and the Panel to Review Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Proposal in Fluids.

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354 NASA SPACE TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPS AND PRIORITIES STEPHEN RUFFIN is an associate professor in the School of Aerospace Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology, director of NASA’s Georgia Space Grant Consortium, head of the Aerothermodynamics Research and Technology Laboratory, and chair of the Aerodynamics and Fluid Mechanics Group. He is a specialist in high temperature gas dynamics, compressible flow aerodynamics, and airframe propulsion integration. He is leading development of a 3-D Cartesian-grid-based Navier-Stokes solver for design applications and development of Cartesian-grid approaches for chemically reacting flows. Dr. Ruffin is also conducting research on high speed, high temperature flows in which vibrational energy modes are substantially excited and in which chemical non- equilibrium exists. He has developed a novel thermochemical model which provides improved predictions in these types of flows. Dr. Ruffin led several computational and experimental studies in a NASA ballistic range of blunted reentry vehicles and noses employing this concept. As principal investigator of the NASA Ames 3-D NASP Nozzle Simulation Project he developed a 3-D Navier-Stokes computer program for accurately predicting the propulsive exhaust flow and its interaction with a generic afterbody region. He received his Ph.D. in aeronautics and astro - nautics from Stanford University in 1993, a M.S. in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT in 1987, and a B.S. in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Princeton University in 1985. Dr. Ruffin’s previous NRC committee membership includes the Panel on Air and Ground Vehicle Technology–2007 and Panel A: Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics. ROBERT J. SINCLAIR is the chief engineer at Airborne Systems North America, Space Systems, in Santa Ana, California. Mr. Sinclair has been involved in the design and development of decelerator systems for over 3 decades. He was the lead engineer for the Huygens Descent Control Sub-System and the Beagle 2 EDLS. Mr. Sinclair is currently leading the design team for the NASA Orion Earth Landing System as well as leading the design teams for a number of the NASA Commercial Crew Development systems. Mr. Sinclair has spent his entire career work - ing on deceleration systems and is passionate about the subject. Many of his designs are in service with the U.K. Ministry of Defence, the U.S. DOD, and many agencies throughout the world. Mr. Sinclair received his Higher National Diploma in mechanical engineering from Stevenage College (U.K.) in 1987. BYRON D. TAPLEY (NAE) holds the Clare Cockrell Williams Centennial Chair in Engineering and is director of the Center for Space Research at the University of Texas in Austin. His research interests include orbit mechanics, precision orbit determination, guidance and navigation, nonlinear parameter estimation, satellite data analysis and the uses of methods from these areas to study the Earth and planetary system. Currently, he is the mission principal investigator for the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Mission, which is the first NASA Earth System Pathfinder Mission. A recent focus of his research has been directed to applying the GRACE measurements to determine accurate models for the Earth’s gravity field and using these measurements for studies of climate driven mass exchange between the Earth’s dynamic system components. He is a member of the NAE and a fellow member of AIAA, the American Geophysical Union (AGU), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement, the NASA Public Service Medal, the AAS Brouwer Award, the AIAA Mechanics and Control of Flight Award, the NASA Exceptional Public Service Medal, and the AGU Charles A. Whitten Medal are among the awards he has received. He has been a principal investiga - tor for seven NASA and international missions. He is a registered professional engineer in the state of Texas. He has served as a member of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC), vice chair of the NAC Science Committee, and chair of the NAC Earth Science Subcommittee. He earned his Ph.D. in engineering mechanics, his M.S. in engi - neering mechanics, and his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Texas in Austin. His previous membership service includes the Panel on Climate Variability and Change, the Space Studies Board, the Panel to Review NASA’s Earth Observing System in the Context of the USGCRP, the Committee on NASA’s Space Station Engineering and Technology Development, the NASA Technical Roadmaps Study, and the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, the Geophysics Research Forum, and the Steering Committee for the Study and Workshop on NASA’s Space Research and Technology Program. BETH E. WAHL is an independent consultant in Littleton, Colorado, with over 30 years of experience in aerospace systems development and space mission systems engineering. While employed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory,

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355 APPENDIX R Ms. Wahl was the cognizant engineer responsible for the entry aeroshell for the Mars Pathfinder Lander and was engineering lead for instrument integration and landed operations development for the Mars Polar Lander. Addi - tionally at JPL, she led the investigation and development for several enabling technologies for NASA’s Pluto mission, which served as pathfinders for the eventual New Horizons mission to Pluto, as well as subsequent Mars missions. More recently, Ms. Wahl supported Lockheed Martin, conducting feasibility studies, risk assessments, and providing systems engineering analysis for the Constellation Program’s Orion Crew Capsule. Since 2001, she has supported NASA, conducting technical studies and providing technical assessment of both proposed and development projects for space science missions. Ms. Wahl earned a B.S.M.E from California State University, Long Beach in 1986 and her M.B.A. from the University of La Verne in 1991. She served as a member on the NRC Committee on Technology for Human/Robotic Exploration and Development of Space. GERALD D. WALBERG is professor emeritus of the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University. From 2000 to 2009, he operated Walberg Aerospace, a research company specializing in entry aerothermodynamics, trajectory optimization, and planetary mission analysis. After establishing Walberg Aerospace, Dr. Walberg worked for NASA Langley on the Revolutionary Aerospace Concepts Program and car- ried out reentry safety analyses on the Stirling Radioisotope Power System for Teledyne Energy Systems and the Multimission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator System for Boeing/Rocketdyne. While at NASA Langley, Dr. Walberg played a lead role in the analysis and testing of the Apollo Heat Shield, led a team that developed some of the first rigorous analyses of radiatively-coupled flow fields, applied these analyses in supporting the Viking, Pioneer Venus, and Galileo Probe missions and chaired the Flight Readiness Revenue for the Galileo heat shield. Following retirement from NASA, he taught at the NASA/George Washington University Joint Institute for Advancement of Flight Sciences. In 1999, he retired from teaching where he was the director of the North Carolina State University Mars Mission Research Center in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from 1991 through 1999. From 1957 to 1989, Dr. Walberg was employed at the NASA Langley Research Center where he held positions ranging from research engineer to deputy director for space. Dr. Walberg received his Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from North Carolina State University in 1974, an M.S. in aerospace engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1961, and his B.S. in aeronautical engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1956. His NRC service includes previous membership on the Com - mittee to Review NASA’s Exploration Technology Development Programs and the Committee on Space Facilities. STAFF ALAN C. ANGLEMAN, Study Director, has been a senior program officer for the Aeronautics and Space Engi- neering Board (ASEB) since 1993, directing studies on the modernization of the U.S. air transportation system, system engineering and design systems, aviation weather systems, aircraft certification standards and procedures, commercial supersonic aircraft, the safety of space launch systems, radioisotope power systems, cost growth of NASA Earth and space science missions, and other aspects of aeronautics and space research and technology. Previously, Mr. Angleman worked for consulting firms in the Washington area providing engineering support ser- vices to the Department of Defense and NASA Headquarters. His professional career began with the U.S. Navy, where he served for nine years as a nuclear-trained submarine officer. He has a B.S. in engineering physics from the U.S. Naval Academy and an M.S. in applied physics from the Johns Hopkins University. JOSEPH K. ALEXANDER is a senior program officer for the Space Studies Board (SSB). He served as SSB director from 1998 to 2005. He was previously Deputy Assistant Administrator for Science in EPA’s Office of Research and Development (1994-98), Associate Director of Space Sciences at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (1993-94), and Assistant Associate Administrator for Space Sciences and Applications in the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications (1987-93). Other positions have included Deputy NASA Chief Scientist and Senior Policy Analyst at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Mr. Alexander’s own research work has been in radio astronomy and space physics. He received B.S. and M.A. degrees in physics from the Col - lege of William and Mary and completed the Advanced Management Program at the Harvard Business School.

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356 NASA SPACE TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPS AND PRIORITIES IAN W. PRYKE is a senior program officer with the SSB. Mr. Pryke, who retired from the European Space Agency (ESA) in 2003, is also a senior fellow/assistant professor at the Center for Aerospace Policy Research in the School of Public Policy at George Mason University. While at ESA, he first worked in the areas of data processing and satellite communications and then the Earth Observation Programme Office, where he was involved in the for- mulation of ESA’s Remote Sensing program. In 1979, he moved to the ESA Washington, D.C., office, where he served as a liaison to both government and industry in the United States and Canada. He became head of the office in 1983. Mr. Pryke holds a B.S. in physics from the University of London and an M.A. in space electronics and communications from the University of Kent. He is a fellow of the American Astronautical Society, the AIAA, and the British Interplanetary Society. He is also a member of the International Academy of Astronautics and an associate founder and trustee of the International Space University. ROBERT L. RIEMER joined the NRC in 1985. He is a staff member for the Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA) who is shared with SSB and ASEB. He served as senior program officer for the two most recent decadal surveys of astronomy and astrophysics and has worked on studies in many areas of physics and astronomy for the BPA (where he served as associate director from 1988-2000). Prior to joining the NRC, Dr. Riemer was a senior project geophysicist with Chevron Corporation. He received his Ph.D. in experimental high-energy physics from the University of Kansas-Lawrence and his B.S. in physics and astrophysics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. JOHN WENDT joined the ASEB as a part-time, off-site senior program officer in 2002. He has served as study director on proposal evaluations for the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the State of Ohio and has par- ticipated in NASA-sponsored studies associated with the Exploration Technology Development Program, NIAC, and NASA’s laboratory facilities. From 1990 to 1999, Dr. Wendt served as director of the von Karman Institute (VKI) for Fluid Dynamics, a NATO-affiliated international postgraduate and research establishment located in Brussels, Belgium. He joined the VKI in 1964 and served as head of the Aeronautics/Aerospace Department and dean of the faculty prior to becoming director. His research interests were rarefied gas dynamics, transonics, high angle of attack aerodynamics, and hypersonic reentry, including major inputs to the European Hermes space shuttle program. Dr. Wendt has consulted for the U.S. Air Force, NATO, and the European Space Agency. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Dr. Wendt holds a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and astronautical sciences from Northwestern University. MAUREEN MELLODY has been a program officer with the ASEB since 2002, where she has worked on studies related to NASA’s aeronautics research and development program, servicing options for the Hubble Space Tele - scope, and other projects in space and aeronautics. Previously, she served as the 2001-2002 AIP Congressional Science Fellow in the office of Congressman Howard L. Berman (D-CA), focusing on intellectual property and technology transfer. Dr. Mellody also worked as a postdoctoral research scientist at the University of Michigan in 2001. She received a Ph.D. in applied physics from the University of Michigan in 2000, an M.S. in applied physics from the University of Michigan in 1997, and a B.S. in physics in 1995 from Virginia Tech. Her research specialties include acoustics and audio signal processing. CATHERINE A. GRUBER is an editor with the SSB. She joined the SSB as a senior program assistant in 1995. Ms. Gruber first came to the NRC in 1988 as a senior secretary for the Computer Science and Telecommunica - tions Board and has also worked as an outreach assistant for the National Academy of Sciences-Smithsonian Institution’s National Science Resources Center. She was a research assistant (chemist) in the National Institute of Mental Health’s Laboratory of Cell Biology for 2 years. She has a B.A. in natural science from St. Mary’s College of Maryland. AMANDA R. THIBAULT, a research associate, joined the ASEB in 2011. Ms. Thibault is a graduate of Creighton University, where she earned her B.S. in atmospheric science in 2008. From there she went on to Texas Tech University where she studied lightning trends in tornadic and non-tornadic supercell thunderstorms and worked as

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357 APPENDIX R a teaching and research assistant. She participated in the VORTEX 2 field project from 2009 to 2010 and gradu - ated with an M.S. in atmospheric science from Texas Tech University in 2010. She is a member of the American Meteorological Society. DIONNA WILLIAMS is a program associate with the SSB, having previously worked for the National Academies’ Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education for 5 years. Ms. Williams has a long career in office administration, having worked as a supervisor in a number of capacities and fields. Ms. Williams attended the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, and majored in psychology. TERRI BAKER joined the SSB in June 2009 as a senior program assistant, having worked previously at the National Academies’ Center for Education. She has held numerous managerial, administrative, and coordinative positions, in which she focused on improving productivity and organization. Mrs. Baker is working on her B.A. in business management. RODNEY HOWARD joined the SSB as a senior project assistant in 2002. Before joining SSB, most of his vocational life was spent in the health profession—as a pharmacy technologist at Doctor’s Hospital in Lanham, Maryland, and as an interim center administrator at the Concentra Medical Center in Jessup, Maryland. During that time, he participated in a number of Quality Circle Initiatives which were designed to improve relations between management and staff. Mr. Howard obtained his B.A. in communications from the University of Baltimore County in 1983. LINDA WALKER has been with the National Academies since 2007. Before her assignment with the SSB, she was on assignment with the National Academies Press. Prior to her working at the National Academies, she was with the Association for Healthcare Philanthropy in Falls Church, Virginia. Ms. Walker has 28 years of adminis - trative experience. ANNA B. WILLIAMS, a Fall 2011 Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow, received her Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Northeastern University. Her doctoral work focused on the inhibition of protein-protein interactions between nuclear receptors and coactivator proteins, which are known to play a key role in a number of pathologies including hormone- responsive cancers. Another aspect of her work was in the development of synthetic methodology toward the efficient radiolabeling of compounds of known biological activity for use as radioactive tracers. Dr. Williams received her bachelor’s degree in chemistry with a minor in philosophy from Dickinson College, where she became particularly interested in the interface between science and the public sphere. MICHAEL H. MOLONEY is the director of the SSB and the ASEB at the NRC. Since joining the NRC in 2001, Dr. Moloney has served as a study director at the National Materials Advisory Board, the BPA, the Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design, and the Center for Economic, Governance, and International Studies. Before joining the SSB and ASEB in April 2010, he was associate director of the BPA and study director for the Astro2010 decadal survey for astronomy and astrophysics. In addition to his professional experience at the NRC, Dr. Moloney has more than 7 years experience as a foreign-service officer for the Irish government and served in that capacity at the Embassy of Ireland in Washington, D.C., the Mission of Ireland to the United Nations in New York, and the Department of Foreign Affairs in Dublin, Ireland. A physicist, Dr. Moloney did his graduate Ph.D. work at Trinity College Dublin in Ireland. He received his undergraduate degree in experimental physics at University College Dublin, where he was awarded the Nevin Medal for Physics.

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