Appendix H

Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

WILLIAM F. EDDY (Chair) is John C. Warner professor of statistics at Carnegie Mellon University, and he also holds appointments in the School of Computer Science and the Department of Biological Sciences. He is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He has served on two National Research Council (NRC) boards, seven NRC panels, and eight NRC committees. He is former chair of the Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT) and was previously the chair of the Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics. Some of the panels he has served on are the Panel to Update the Fourth Edition of Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency; the Committee on Assessing the Feasibility, Accuracy, and Technical Capability of a National Ballistics Database; the Panel on Enhancing the Data Infrastructure in Support of Food and Nutrition Programs, Research, and Decision Making; the Panel to Review the Statistical Procedures for the Decennial Census; and the Committee to Review the Bureau of Transportation Statistics Survey Programs. He completed his term as chair of CNSTAT in June 2010. He received a Ph.D. in statistics from Yale University.

MARILYN A. BROWN is a professor of public policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology and a member of the board of directors of the Tennessee Valley Authority. Previously, she was the interim director of the



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Appendix H Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff WILLIAM F. EDDY (Chair) is John C. Warner professor of statistics at Carnegie Mellon University, and he also holds appointments in the School of Computer Science and the Department of Biological Sciences. He is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and the American Association for the Advance- ment of Science and is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He has served on two National Research Council (NRC) boards, seven NRC panels, and eight NRC committees. He is former chair of the Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT) and was previously the chair of the Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics. Some of the panels he has served on are the Panel to Update the Fourth Edition of Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency; the Committee on Assessing the Feasibility, Accuracy, and Technical Capability of a National Ballistics Database; the Panel on Enhancing the Data Infrastructure in Support of Food and Nutrition Programs, Research, and Decision Making; the Panel to Review the Statistical Procedures for the Decennial Census; and the Com- mittee to Review the Bureau of Transportation Statistics Survey Programs. He completed his term as chair of CNSTAT in June 2010. He received a Ph.D. in statistics from Yale University. MARILYN A. BROWN is a professor of public policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology and a member of the board of directors of the Tennessee Valley Authority. Previously, she was the interim director of the 125

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126 EFFECTIVE TRACKING OF BUILDING ENERGY USE Engineering Science and Technology Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). During her 22 years at ORNL, she researched the impacts of policies and programs aimed at advancing the market entry of sustainable energy technologies and led several energy technology and policy scenario studies. Prior to serving at ORNL, she was a tenured associ- ate professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Illinois, Urbana–Champaign, where she conducted research on the diffusion of energy innovations. She has authored over 200 publications and has been an expert witness in hearings before committees of both the U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives. She was a member of Working Group III of the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and coauthor of the 2007 Assessment Report on Mitigation of Climate Change. The IPCC was honored with the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize in part for this work. A recent study that she co-led, Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future, was the subject of two Senate hearings, has been cited in proposed federal legislation, and has had a significant role in international climate change debates. She serves on the boards of directors of several energy, engineering, and environmen- tal organizations, including the Alliance to Save Energy and the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, and she serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Technology Transfer. She is also a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Board on Energy and Environmental Systems and the National Commission on Energy Policy. She served on the NRC Committee on America’s Climate Choices and the NRC Panel on Limiting the Magnitude of Future Climate Change. She has a Ph.D. in geography from Ohio State University. MICHAEL L. COHEN is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics. He is currently serving as study director for the Panel on Industrial Methods for the Effective Test and Development of Defense Systems, the Panel on the Theory and Application of Reliability Growth Modeling to Defense Systems, and the Workshop on Future Directions for the National Science Foundation National Patterns of Research and Development Program. Previously, he has directed studies involving census and survey methodology and the testing and evaluation of defense systems in development, as well as a study on handling missing data in clinical trials. He was a mathematical statistician at the U.S. Energy Information Administration, an assistant professor at the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, and a visiting lecturer in statistics at Princeton University. His general area of interest is the use of statistics in public policy,

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127 APPENDIX H with particular focus on census undercount, model validation, and robust estimation. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He received a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. FREDERICK CONRAD is research professor in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, adjunct associate professor of psy- chology at the University of Michigan, and research associate professor in the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland. He spent more than 10 years at the Bureau of Labor Statistics as a senior research psychologist, where he twice received the U.S. Department of Labor Secretary’s Exceptional Achievement Award. His research involves new data collection methods such as interactive web surveys and virtual interviewers; interviewer–respondent interaction, including the effects of spoken language on outcomes of survey invitation interactions; reliability of pretesting techniques; and the role of public events in personal memory. He has received National Science Foundation grants for research on re- sponding to surveys on mobile, multimodal devices; animated agents in self-administered surveys; adaptive interfaces for collecting survey data from users; costs and benefits of conversational interviews; and the usability of electronic voting systems. He served on the National Research Council’s panel to review the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Resource Management Survey. He served as associate editor of the Journal of Official Statistics from 2002 to 2011 and coedited a special issue of Applied Cognitive Psychology on cognitive aspects of survey methodology. He is a past member of the editorial board of Public Opinion Quarterly. He has a Ph.D. in cogni- tive psychology from the University of Chicago. DONALD A. DILLMAN is regents professor in the Department of So- ciology at Washington State University. He also serves as deputy director for research and development in the Washington State University Social and Economic Sciences Research Center (SESRC), and he founded the SESRC’s Public Opinion Laboratory, one of the first university-based telephone survey laboratories in the United States. He served as a senior survey methodologist in the Office of the Director of the U.S. Bureau of the Census, leading to the development of new questionnaire designs and procedures for the 2000 decennial census and other government surveys. He has written or co-written 13 books and has 245 other publications. He has had a career-long emphasis on research to improve survey methodolo-

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128 EFFECTIVE TRACKING OF BUILDING ENERGY USE gies and apply them to the conduct of high-quality surveys. His research has also emphasized the development and use of new technologies, including the impact of information technologies on rural people and organizations. He has received many awards, including the Distinguished Rural Sociolo- gist Award for Career Achievement from the Rural Sociological Society, the Exceptionally Distinguished Achievement Award from the American Association for Public Opinion Research, the Lester F. Ward Distinguished Contributions to Applied Sociology Award from the Society for Applied Sociology, and the Roger Herriot Award for Innovation in Federal Statistics from the American Statistical Association and the Washington Statisti- cal Society. He is a past president of the American Association of Public Opinion Research. He served on the National Research Council panel on census residence rules and on the Survey of Earned Doctorates advisory panel. He served on the Federal Economic Statistics Advisory Committee providing advice to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Bureau of Economic Analysis, and the Census Bureau. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from Iowa State University. DWIGHT K. FRENCH retired as director of the Energy Consumption Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy, in March 2007. The Energy Consumption Division is responsible for planning and conducting the Residential Energy Consumption Survey, the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey, and the Manufacturing Energy Consump- tion Survey. He was responsible for the overall management of the division’s energy consumption information programs and research studies as well as for providing technical input into these programs and studies. He was recognized as EIA’s foremost technical expert on energy use. He served on many EIA cross-organizational teams tasked with improving the operations and data quality of information systems across EIA as well as the technical and management quality of the organization. He authored research reports, papers presented at professional meetings, and a summary history of the Energy Consumption Program at EIA. Previously, he had also served as the chief mathematical statistician of the division, responsible for review of and technical input into statistical methods for information and research pro- grams and developing, adapting, and applying statistical techniques related to overall survey conceptual planning, complex sample design, parameter and variance estimation, statistical analysis and reporting, and quality con- trol. Prior to joining EIA, he was a mathematical statistician at the National

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129 APPENDIX H Center for Health Statistics. He has an M.A. with an emphasis in statistics from the Ohio State University. JACK G. GAMBINO is director of the Household Survey Methods Divi- sion at Statistics Canada. He manages a methodology division responsible for the design, development, implementation, and maintenance of almost all of Statistics Canada’s household surveys. He has provided guidance and advice to methodologists and client program managers on methodological issues, including research and development of innovative methods; and he chaired the Methodology Research and Development Committee, which was responsible for overseeing research in the methodology branch. He participated in two redesigns of the Canadian labor force survey, proposing innovations to improve the survey design and planning studies to evaluate these proposals. He is a member of the American Statistical Association and the Statistical Society of Canada and is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He holds a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Toronto. CLARK W. GELLINGS is a fellow at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). He has been at EPRI since 1982; prior to that, he was with the Public Service Enterprise Group in New Jersey. He is both an electrical and mechanical engineer with a strong background in the development of new products and services for the energy industry, especially those applied to the power industry. He has many accomplishments in developing systems for demand-side management and optimal and cost-effective utility manage- ment and in applying digital technology in the power sector in order to gain efficiencies in generation, dispatching, and end use. He is a member of numerous professional associations and has received many prizes for his work over the years. He has authored or coauthored more than 400 articles or papers and 10 books. He has an M.S. in mechanical engineering from the New Jersey Institute of Technology, an M.S. in management science from Stevens Institute of Technology, and a B.S. in electrical engineering from the Newark College of Engineering. JANE F. GENTLEMAN is director of the Division of Health Interview Sta- tistics at the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She was honored as the first recipient of the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Janet L. Norwood Award for Outstanding Achievement by a Woman in the Statistical Sciences in 2002.

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130 EFFECTIVE TRACKING OF BUILDING ENERGY USE She was honored by the University of Waterloo’s Faculty of Mathematics with an achievement medal as one of the top graduates in 2005. Prior to coming to the NCHS in 1999, she was a senior research statistician, then chief of the health status and vital statistics section, and finally the assistant director of analytic methods at Statistics Canada. She taught statistics at the University of Waterloo prior to moving to Statistics Canada. She has a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Waterloo. DAVID G. HUNGERFORD is the special advisor to Commissioner Anthony Eggert and former special advisor to Commissioner Arthur Rosenfeld at the California Energy Commission. His areas of responsibility include energy efficiency, alternative transportation fuels, smart grid, and demand forecasting. He most recently served as the energy commission’s lead staff member on demand-response policy development. His profes- sional career has focused on conducting and overseeing evaluation research of energy efficiency and demand-response programs and using those results to analyze the impacts of policy change for the purpose of developing and guiding policy initiatives. He has also served on numerous technical advi- sory committees for investor-owned utility programs and public interest energy research projects. His professional focus is in energy policy analysis, and his research interests are in technology and society issues, technology adoption, consumer behavior, and social change applied to the problem of energy consumption. He received his Ph.D. in 2003 from the University of California, Davis, in human ecology. NANCY J. KIRKENDALL joined the staff of the Committee on National Statistics as a senior program officer in May 2009. Currently, she is study director for the Panel on Using the ACS to Estimate the Percent of Chil- dren Eligible for the School Meals Program. She served as director of the Statistics and Methods Group, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), and as a member of EIA’s senior staff from 2002 to 2008. She has held a variety of other positions in EIA. From 1996 to 1999, she served as senior mathematical statistician in the Statistical Policy Branch, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget. There, she also served as the desk officer for the U.S. Bureau of Census, chaired the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology, and led a variety of interagency activities. She taught part-time at the George Washington University in the Statistics Department from 1978 to 1996 and in the En- gineering Management and Systems Engineering Department from 1996

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131 APPENDIX H to 2002. She is a past vice president of the American Statistical Association and a past president of the Washington Statistical Society. She received the Roger Herriot Award for Innovation in Federal Statistics in 2007 and the American Statistical Association’s Founder’s Award in 2001, and was award- ed the status of fellow of the American Statistical Association in 1993. She is a member of the American Statistical Association’s Committee on Energy Statistics and the Accreditation Implementation Committee. She holds a Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from George Washington University. NINA S.-N. LAM is a professor and former chair of the Department of Environmental Sciences at Louisiana State University (LSU). She is also adjunct professor in the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Science and the Department of Geography and Anthropology at LSU. She was a program director of the Geography and Regional Science Program at the National Science Foundation and the president of the University Consor- tium on Geographic Information Science. She is an expert in geographic information science, remote sensing, spatial analysis, and environmental health. She has published on topics, such as spatial interpolation, fractals in geography, cancer mortality and spatial data mining, HIV/AIDS in America, and, lately, on modeling business return in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina and on measuring community resilience. She has served on numerous national and international advisory panels and journal edito- rial boards, including review panels and committees for the National Re- search Council, the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. She has received several awards, including an Outstanding Contributions in Remote Sensing Award from the Association of American Geographers, an LSU Distinguished Faculty Award in 2006, an LSU Rainmaker Award in 2008, an LSU Distinguished Research Master Award in 2009, and an Outstanding Faculty Research Award by the LSU School of the Coast and Environment in 2011. She received her Ph.D. in geography from the Uni- versity of Western Ontario, Canada. KRISZTINA MARTON (Study Director) is senior program officer with the Committee on National Statistics. She is currently serving as study director for the Panel on Measuring the Group Quarters Population in the American Community Survey. She previously served as the study director of the Workshop on the Future of Federal Household Surveys. Previously, she was a survey researcher at Mathematica Policy Research (MPR), where

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132 EFFECTIVE TRACKING OF BUILDING ENERGY USE she conducted methodological research and oversaw data collections for the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and other clients. Prior to joining MPR, she was a survey director in the Ohio State University Center for Survey Research. She has a Ph.D. in communications with an interdisciplinary specialization in survey research from the Ohio State University. ALAN K. MEIER is a senior scientist and principal investigator at Law- rence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), where he leads the Technol- ogy, Energy, Markets and Analysis group. He is also associate director of the University of California, Davis, Energy Efficiency Center. He spent four years as senior advisor in energy efficiency at the International Energy Agency in Paris. His research has focused on understanding how people (and machines) use energy and the opportunities to conserve. His research on standby power use in appliances—1 percent of global CO2 emissions— led him to propose an international plan to reduce standby power in all de- vices to less than 1 watt, which has now been endorsed by the G8 countries. Other research topics include energy use of consumer electronics, energy test procedures, indicators of performance for commercial buildings, and international policies to promote energy efficiency. He has developed tech- niques for the collection, analysis, and display of regional electricity supply and consumption in real time. Previously, he supervised all activities of the Building Energy Analysis Group at LBNL. He is the executive editor of the magazine Home Energy and past editor of the journal Energy and Buildings. He is the author of many articles and two books, Supplying Energy through Greater Efficiency and Saving Electricity in a Hurry. He earned his Ph.D. in energy and resources from the University of California, Berkeley. MICHAEL M. MEYER works for Google, Inc., and is based in Seattle, Washington. Previously he was cofounder and chief scientist at Intelligent Results, Inc., a software company specializing in collecting raw data from interviews and developing software to analyze large databases for the pur- pose of predicting behavior with regard to debt collection and the financing industry. He also held mathematics and engineering analyst positions at the Boeing Company and at Amazon.com. He served as a senior research scien- tist in the Department of Statistics at Carnegie Mellon University, where he was the director of special projects in computing services and the director of the applications software group. He held an academic appointment in

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133 APPENDIX H the Department of Statistics at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He served on the National Research Council Committee to Assess the Feasi- bility, Accuracy, and Technical Capability of a National Ballistics Database and the Panel on the Research on Future Census Methods. In 1991–1992, on a part-time basis, he served as the study director for the Panel to Review Evaluation Studies of Bilingual Education. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, in part for his role in the development and main- tenance of the Statlib archive of statistical software and data resources. He received a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Minnesota. MAXINE L. SAVITZ is retired general manager of Technology Partner- ships at Honeywell, Inc., and has more than 35 years of experience manag- ing research, development, and implementation programs for the public and private sectors, including in the aerospace, transportation, and indus- trial sectors. From 1979 to 1983, she served as deputy assistant secretary for conservation in the U.S. Department of Energy. She currently serves as vice president of the National Academy of Engineering. She serves on advisory bodies for the Sandia National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and is a member of the board of directors of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. She served on the National Academies’ Committee on America’s Energy Future and was vice chair of the Panel on Energy Efficiency. She was recently appointed to the President’s Council of Advisors for Science and Technology. She has a Ph.D. in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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