TABLE 3-1 CBECS Data Collection Years and Survey Characteristics

Year

Completed Interviews

Survey Characteristics

1979

6,221

The survey was called the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (NBECS). The sample was based on a nonresidential building sample that had been developed by the data collection contractor for another survey. The design included nonresidential buildings of all sizes as well as buildings that were predominantly residential or industrial if commercial activity was present. In addition to the building interview, information about energy consumption and expenditures was also collected from the building's energy suppliers. The smallest level of geographic detail for which data were available was the census region.

1983

7,140

The survey was a follow-up to the 1979 survey. The same buildings were surveyed again, along with a sample of new construction. The smallest level of geographic detail for which data were available was the census region.

1986

6,072

The survey was renamed the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The sampling frame was redesigned and based on an area-based listing approach, in which the area sample was supplemented with lists of large and special buildings. The new approach excluded buildings of 1,000 square feet or less and limited the sample to buildings that were predominantly commercial. The smallest level of geographic detail for which data were available was the census division.

1989

5,876

No major changes to the sample design. A sample of new construction was added. The smallest level of geographic detail for which data were available was the census division.

1992

4,806

No major changes to the sample design. A sample of new construction was added. The smallest level of geographic detail for which data were available was the census division.

1995

5,766

Commercial buildings that were part of industrial facilities and parking garages were dropped from scope. A sample of new construction was added. The survey was moved from paper-and-pencil personal interview to computer-assisted personal interview. The smallest level of geographic detail for which data were available was the census division.



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