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Biographical Sketches of Contributors

 

DARARATT ANANTANASUWONG is senior researcher in economics in the Research Center and School of Development Economics of the National Institute of Development Administration (NIDA) in Bangkok, Thailand. Her research interests have been in sustainable development and environmental economics. Recently she has extended her interests into the sustainability of Thai society with an aging population. She is program director of the Health, Aging, and Retirement Study (HART) in Thailand. In 2009, with her research colleagues from NIDA, she conducted the baseline pilot HART project with funding from the National Research Council of Thailand; in 2011, the second pilot project was in progress with funding from the National Higher Education Commission. She completed the Ph.D. program in economics at Kyoto University and also has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

PERIANAYAGAM AROKIASAMY is professor in the Department of Development Studies at the International Institute for Population Sciences in Mumbai, India. He has more than two decades of teaching and research experience in demography, development, and health studies. A Wellcome Trust postdoctoral fellow in population studies at the London School of Economics from 1999-2000, he has been a consultant to the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Harvard School of Public Health. His research experience also includes coordinating and conducting three major national research projects: the National Family Health Survey India-3 in 2005-2007, the WHO-World Health Survey India in



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Biographical Sketches of Contributors DARARATT ANANTANASUWONG is senior researcher in economics in the Research Center and School of Development Economics of the National Institute of Development Administration (NIDA) in Bangkok, Thailand. Her research interests have been in sustainable development and environmental economics. Recently she has extended her interests into the sustainability of Thai society with an aging population. She is program director of the Health, Aging, and Retirement Study (HART) in Thailand. In 2009, with her research colleagues from NIDA, she con- ducted the baseline pilot HART project with funding from the National Research Council of Thailand; in 2011, the second pilot project was in progress with funding from the National Higher Education Commission. She completed the Ph.D. program in economics at Kyoto University and also has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. PERIANAYAGAM AROKIASAMY is professor in the Department of Development Studies at the International Institute for Population Sci - ences in Mumbai, India. He has more than two decades of teaching and research experience in demography, development, and health studies. A Wellcome Trust postdoctoral fellow in population studies at the London School of Economics from 1999–2000, he has been a consultant to the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Harvard School of Public Health. His research experience also includes coordinating and conduct- ing three major national research projects: the National Family Health Survey India-3 in 2005–2007, the WHO–World Health Survey India in 451

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452 AGING IN ASIA 2003–2005, and the Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health in 2006– 2007. He is currently involved in initiating a major nationally representa - tive longitudinal aging study, the Longitudinal Ageing Study in India, in collaboration with the Harvard School of Public Health and the U.S. National Institute on Aging. He has a Ph.D. in population studies from Annamalai University in India. LISA BERKMAN is director of the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies. A social epidemiologist whose work focuses exten- sively on psychosocial influences on health outcomes, her research has been oriented toward understanding social inequalities in health related to socioeconomic status, different racial and ethnic groups, and social net - works, support, and social isolation. The majority of her work is devoted to identifying the role of social networks and support in predicting declines in physical and cognitive functioning and the onset of disease and mortal- ity, especially related to cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease. She has been an innovator in linking social experiences with physical and mental health outcomes and coedited the first textbook on social epidemiology, Social Epidemiology. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley. DAVID E. BLOOM is Clarence James Gamble professor of economics and demography at the Harvard School of Public Health, director of Harvard University’s Program on the Global Demography of Aging, and princi- pal investigator of the Longitudinal Aging Study in India. Previously, he served on the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University and Columbia Uni - versity. Bloom is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a faculty research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (Programs in Labor Economics, Health Care, and Aging), and a member of the book review board of Science magazine. He chairs the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Ageing and Society. He has written extensively on education and health in developing coun - tries, labor and employment issues in the United States and globally, and environmental quality. His current interests include the effects of population health and population dynamics on economic growth and development, the value of vaccination, and population aging in India and other countries. He has a B.S. in industrial and labor relations from Cornell University and an M.A. in economics and a Ph.D. in economics and demography from Princeton University. WEI CAI is a consultant working in the Development Research Group at the World Bank in Washington, DC. Her research interests include

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453 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS China’s internal and external migration and population aging. She has an M.A. in development economics and China studies from Oxford University. BENJAMIN CAPISTRANT is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Society, Human Development, and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. His research focuses on the social epidemiology of aging in global health, in particular how health in older age affects one’s fam- ily, especially the health effects of caregiving. His other work investigates social gradients in health, including disability, mental health, and cardio - vascular disease among middle and older age adults in the United States and globally. AMITABH CHANDRA is an economist and professor of public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He is also a research fellow at the IZA Institute for the Study of Labor in Bonn, Germany, and at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research focuses on produc- tivity, cost growth, and racial disparities in healthcare. In 2011, he served on the Special Commission on Provider Price Reform in Massachusetts. He is an editor of the Review of Economics and Statistics, Economics Letters, and the American Economic Journal. He is the recipient of an Outstanding Teacher Award, the Upjohn Institute’s International Dissertation Research Award, the Kenneth Arrow Award for best paper in health economics, and the Eugene Garfield Award for the impact of medical research. He has been a consultant to the RAND Corporation, Microsoft, and the Blue Cross Blue Shield Foundation of Massachusetts. He has a Ph.D. in eco - nomics from the University of Kentucky. SOMNATH CHATTERJI leads the multicountry studies program in the Department of Health Statistics and Information Systems at the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva, Switzerland. In that position, he coordinates the Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE), which is supported by the U.S. National Institute on Aging. SAGE also is being implemented at eight Health and Demographic Surveillance sites as part of the International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health in Developing Countries. Building on SAGE, studies are also being carried out in three European countries. The measurement of health and health-related outcomes, their trends and determinants, with an emphasis on older adults, is the main focus of the international studies of the team. Chatterji leads the World Mental Health surveys on the epidemiology of mental disorders in 30 countries. He also coordinates work on the WHO Quality of Life measure, which is used internationally in clinical and population studies. He was closely involved

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454 AGING IN ASIA with the development of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule. He trained as a psychiatrist in Bangalore, India. SUBHOJIT DEY is assistant professor at the Indian Institute of Public Health in Delhi, India, which is a part of the Public Health Foundation of India. He has worked extensively in Africa and India—in collaboration with the U.S. National Cancer Institute and the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France—and has continued interests in the health of populations in developing countries. His particular focus is chronic diseases, particularly cancer, and also environmental exposures, such as those related to xenoestrogens and industrial agents. He teaches quantitative research methods, including epidemiology and biostatistics. He has an M.B.B.S. from the Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research in Pondicherry; an M.D. in alternative medicine from the Indian Institute of Alternative Medicine in Kolkata; and an M.P.H. in international health epidemiology and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health. WU FAN is director general of the Shanghai Municipal Center for Dis- ease Control and Prevention in Shanghai, China. Previously, she was the first director of the National Center for Chronic and Noncommunicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, and executive director of the World Health Organization’s Collaborating Centre on Community-based Integrated Noncommunicable Disease Control and Prevention. Her areas of expertise include public health, especially noncommunicable disease control. She contributed to the establishment of the noncommunicable disease control network across the country, from the national to the county level; assisted the Ministry of Health to determine the responsibilities and tasks of each level in the net - work; and has worked to effectively control both communicable and non- communicable diseases in Shanghai. She leads Shanghai’s program Build- ing the Public Health Capacity and is responsible for the Shanghai Field Epidemiology Training Program in collaboration with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She is also the principal investigator for the Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health in China. She has a B.S. in preventive medicine from the Shanghai Medical University and an M.S. in social medicine and public health management from Fu Dan University in Shanghai. KEVIN FEENEY is a research assistant at the RAND Corporation and technical advisor for the Longitudinal Aging Study in India pilot. His work focuses on cross-national studies related to the economics of aging

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455 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS and health economics in the United States, Europe, and Asia. He gradu - ated from the University of Chicago with a B.A. in economics. JOHN GILES is senior labor economist in the Development Research Group at the World Bank in Washington, DC. He is also a research fellow at the IZA Institute for the Study of Labor in Bonn, Germany. His current research interests include the movement of labor from agricultural to non- agricultural employment, internal migration and its effects on households and communities, poverty traps, household risk-coping and risk manage- ment behavior, population aging and retirement decisions in develop - ing countries, and the relationship between social protection systems and labor supply decisions. Prior to joining the World Bank in 2007, he was associate professor of economics at Michigan State University. His work has appeared in Economic Development and Cultural Change, Economic Journal, the Journal of Comparative Economics, the Journal of Development Economics, the Journal of Public Economics, the Review of Economics and Sta- tistics, and World Development, among others. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley. HAO HONG is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Economics of Pennsylvania State University. His research interests include political economy, economic development, and experimental economics. He has a B.A. in automation from Tsinghua University in Beijing and an M.S. in economics from the China Center for Economic Research at Peking University. PEIFENG (PERRY) HU is associate professor in the Division of Geriatric Medicine of the School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles. His primary research focus has been on biomarkers, psycho- social factors, and their relations with health outcomes in older adults. He has extensive research experience working with large population-based surveys in multiple countries examining the relations between socio- economic factors and health, including the Longitudinal Aging Study in India, the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study, the Indo - nesia Family Life Survey, the Midlife in the United States Study, and the Internal Migration and Health in China Project. In addition to his clinical training in internal medicine and geriatric medicine, he has a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of California, Los Angeles. YUQING HU is a first-year master’s student in the Economics Depart- ment of Duke University, where she also serves as a committee mem- ber of the Economics Masters Council. Her research interests include market design, labor economics, health economics, and the economics of

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456 AGING IN ASIA education and development. Her current study focuses on family inter- generational transfers in China and the United States and the matching markets of the Chinese college admission system. She is the recipient of the Duke Leadership in an Aging Society Program Award. During her undergraduate years, she did research on the China Health and Retire - ment Longitudinal Study and was a survey team member of the Environ- mental Economics Program in China. She also explored leadership roles in several organizations, including the global youth organization AIESEC and Junior Achievement in China. In 2011, she received a B.S in informa- tion management and information systems from Beijing Language and Culture University and a B.A in economics from Peking University as a double degree. HIDEHIKO ICHIMURA is professor of economics in the Graduate School of Economics at the University of Tokyo. Previously, he was pro- fessor in the Department of Economics at the University College London. His areas of expertise include semiparametric analysis and econometric program evaluation. He is a co-principal investigator of the Japanese Study of Aging and Retirement. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society and a past co-editor of Review of Economic Studies. He has a Ph.D. in eco- nomics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. YONG JIANG is deputy director of the Surveillance Division of the National Center for Chronic and Noncommunicable Disease Control and Prevention, China Center for Disease Control and Prevention. His work has been dedicated to noncommunicable disease risk factor surveillance and death cause surveillance in China since 2004. He was the key national coordinator of noncommunicable disease risk factor surveillance in 2004, 2007, and 2010, and he was key investigator in the World Health Organi - zation’s Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health in China. He has con - ducted original research in aging health, health informatics, geographic epidemiology, and surveillance of chronic diseases and risk factors. He has a B.S. in clinical medicine and an M.S. in epidemiology and statistics from North China Coal Medical College. PAUL KOWAL is a scientist in the Multi-Country Studies Unit of the Department of Health Statistics and Information Systems at the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva, Switzerland. He is also senior research fellow at the University of Newcastle’s Research Centre on Gender, Health and Ageing. He has 14 years of experience with WHO working on multicountry studies on aging, health, and well-being. He is co-principal investigator for the WHO Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health. He has a B.S. in pharmacy practice from the University of

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457 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS Wisconsin–Madison, an M.S. in pharmacoepidemiology from the Uni- versity of Minnesota, and a doctor of pharmacy from the University of Washington. J.K. LAKSHMI is assistant professor at the Indian Institute of Public Health in Hyderabad, India (Public Health Foundation of India), where she teaches health promotion, health communication, and environmental health. She is also involved in research on road safety and the engage - ment of traditional, alternative, and complementary healthcare providers. She has worked as a consultant homoeopath, program assistant (drug and alcohol rehabilitation), research assistant (dairy calcium and physi - cal activity studies), and course instructor (women’s health) during and between academic courses. Her research and teaching interests are tradi- tional, complementary, and alternative medicine; cultural influences on health; environmental health; physical activity; aging; the health of dis - advantaged populations; and health communication. She has a bachelor’s degree in homoeopathic medicine and surgery from the University of Health Sciences in Andhra Pradesh, India, and an M.S. in health promo - tion and a Ph.D. in health promotion, disease prevention, and gerontology from Purdue University. JINKOOK LEE is senior economist at RAND Corporation and professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School. Before joining RAND, she was a professor at the Ohio State University and has held visiting positions at the Federal Reserve Board and the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Her research interests include the economics of aging, family economics, and consumer finances, with particular interest in interdisciplinary research on the health and well-being of the elderly. Her recent work includes education gradients in health and their potential pathways in various policy environments and cultures, dyadic analyses of spousal influences on health and well-being, and health disparities across subpopulations in both developed and developing countries. She has developed sev- eral large-scale, multidisciplinary longitudinal studies and has been a co-principal investigator of the Longitudinal Aging Study in India since its inception. She leads the research network of the Health and Retire - ment Studies around the world and has developed the Survey Meta Data Repository with her colleagues at RAND. She has a Ph.D. in family eco - nomics from Ohio State University. RONALD LEE is professor of demography and Jordan family professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley, where he also is director of the Center for the Economics and Demography of Aging. His research interests include the economic demography of intergenerational

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458 AGING IN ASIA transfers, the design of public pension programs, and evolutionary theo - ries of aging. He co-directs the National Transfer Accounts project, which integrates age into the national accounts. He has developed methods for probabilistic population forecasting, combining approaches from statis- tics and demography, including the Lee-Carter method for forecasting mortality and life expectancy, and used these methods to develop proba- bilistic public budget forecasts. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society and a corresponding member of the British Acad - emy. He has an M.A. in demography from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. XIAOYAN LEI is assistant professor of economics at the China Center for Economic Research in the National School of Development at Peking Uni- versity in China. Her research spans the areas of labor economics, health economics, and the economics of aging. Her earlier studies used U.S. data to investigate the relationships among health, labor supply, transfer, and public health insurance programs. Her most recent research focuses on health, aging, and labor issues in China. She is also an active member of the research team for designing and conducting the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. She has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles. LIN LI is associate chief physician and a researcher in the Institute of Hospital Management Research at the People’s Liberation Army Gen- eral Hospital in Beijing, China, and a research fellow in the China Center for Health Economics Research at Peking University. He has extensive experience in hospital management and was an administrative assistant in a military hospital. He is a member of the scientific team for the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study project and contributed to the pilot survey, serving as an enumerator, trainer, and director of the field- work. Currently he focuses on healthcare policy research, including hospi- tal size in China, and the relationship between health and socioeconomic status among the Chinese people. He has an M.D. in health economics from the Second Military Medical University in Shanghai. JENNY LIU is an economist at the University of California, San Francisco, and also an adjunct member of the research staff at the RAND Corpora- tion. Her research interests include studying the relationship between health, aging, and the labor supply in China and India, as well as exam - ining issues related to child health, the burden of malaria, and malaria interventions in various countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. She conducts

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459 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS policy-oriented research on malaria control programs in partnership with the Global Malaria Programme of the World Health Organization. She has a B.A. in molecular and cell biology, M.A. degrees in international affairs and public policy, and a Ph.D. in health policy from the University of California, Berkeley. MALAY MAJMUNDAR is a program officer at the National Research Council of the U.S. National Academies. He has worked on studies on federal budget policy, immigration enforcement and statistics, criminal justice, and demography and aging. He has a B.A. in political science from Duke University, a J.D. from Yale University, and a Ph.D. in public policy from the University of Chicago. ANDREW MASON is professor of economics at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and senior fellow at the East-West Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. He is also a member of the Center for the Economics and Demography of Aging at the University of California, Berkeley. He codirects the National Transfer Accounts (http://www.ntaccounts. org) network, an international project involving researchers from more than 35 countries who are developing a comprehensive approach to measuring and studying the changes in population age structure and the generational economy in both rich and poor countries. His current research is concerned with the macroeconomic effects of population aging, including the effects on standards of living, capital accumulation, and economic growth as well as the effects on public programs, their sustainability, and their impact on generational equity. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. DEVAKI NAMBIAR is a postdoctoral fellow at the Public Health Foun- dation of India and adjunct faculty member in the Indian Institute of Pub- lic Health–Delhi. A former Fulbright scholar and U.S. National Institutes of Health predoctoral and postdoctoral fellow, her research applies critical theory and mixed-method evaluations to the understanding of policy - making on health and its social determinants, focusing in particular on the role of the private nonprofit sector and civil society in health promotion across the life span. She has conducted research and has ongoing research collaborations in Australia, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Tanzania, Vietnam, the United Kingdom, and the United States. She is a member of the People’s Health Movement, the Medico Friend Circle, and the American Public Health Association. She has been a peer reviewer for Global Public Health and was a core member of the technical secretariat for India’s High-Level Expert Group on Universal Health Coverage. She has a Ph.D. in public health from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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460 AGING IN ASIA MARIJA OZOLINS is a law student studying international refugee law at Boston College Law School. At the Harvard School of Public Health, she was technical adviser for the Longitudinal Aging Study in India pilot and contributed to projects ranging from measuring the social and physi- cal determinants of community health to strategizing about more efficient mechanisms of global health governance. She has a B.A. in international studies from the University of Mary Washington. ALBERT PARK is chair, professor of social science, and professor of eco- nomics at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He is also a research fellow at the Center for Economic Policy Research and the Institute for the Study of Labor. Previously, he held faculty positions at the Univer- sity of Michigan and Oxford University. Park is a development and labor economist whose research focuses on the Chinese economy. In recent years, he has published articles on poverty and inequality, migration and employ- ment, health and education, and the economics of aging in China. He has co-directed numerous survey research projects in China and currently serves as a co-principal investigator for the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study and principal investigator for the Gansu Survey of Children and Families. He has consulted frequently for the World Bank and was lead international consultant on its most recent China poverty assess- ment report (2009). He has a Ph.D. from Stanford University. K. SRINATH REDDY is president of the Public Health Foundation of India, which was established to strengthen the capacity for training, research, and policy development in the area of public health in India. Formerly head of the Department of Cardiology at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Reddy is a global leader in preventive cardiology and has worked to promote cardiovascular health, tobacco control, chronic disease prevention, and healthy living across the life span. He has served on many expert panels of the World Health Organization and chairs the Science and Policy Initiatives Committee of the World Heart Federation. He currently chairs India’s High-Level Expert Group on Universal Health Coverage. He chairs the Core Advisory Group on Health and Human Rights for the National Human Rights Commission of India and is also a member of the National Science and Engineering Research Board of gov - ernment of India. Appointed in 2009 as the first Bernard Lown visiting professor of cardiovascular health at the Harvard School of Public Health, he is also an adjunct professor of the Rollins School of Public Health and Emory University and an honorary professor of the Sydney Medical School. He is a foreign associate member of the Institute of Medicine (U.S. National Academies). He has an M.B.B.S. from Osmania Medical College in Hyderabad, India, an M.D. and a D.M. (cardiology) from the All India

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461 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS Institute of Medical Sciences in Delhi, and an M.Sc. in clinical epidemiol - ogy from McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada. UDOMSAK SEENPRACHAWONG is associate professor of economics in the School of Development Economics of the National Institute of Development Administration in Bangkok, Thailand. He has a broad range of interests in applied economics, especially in health economics, envi - ronmental economics, and tourism economics. He has a Ph.D. in busi - ness administration (economics) from the University of Memphis. He also has a certificate in environmental economics from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. T.V. SEKHER is associate professor in the Department of Population Policies and Programs at the International Institute for Population Sci- ences (IIPS) in Mumbai, India. His areas of research interest are social demography, gender issues, public health, and population aging. He has been a visiting fellow at the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medi- cine of the University College London, Fondation Maison des Sciences de l’Homme in Paris, and Lund University in Sweden. He also served as a consultant to the United Nations Population Fund–India. He is one of the national coordinators of demographic and health surveys undertaken by IIPS, such as the District Level Household and Facility Survey for the India Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, the Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health, and the Longitudinal Aging Study in India. He is the editor of the journal Demography India. He has a Ph.D. in sociology and demography from the Institute for Social and Economic Change through Bangalore University. KABIR SHEIKH is research scientist and director of the Health Gover- nance Research Hub at the Public Health Foundation of India. He has 10 years of experience in health policy and systems research, teaching and training, health systems strengthening, and policy development in 15 states of India, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Asia-Pacific, Bangladesh, Brazil, and globally with the World Health Organization. His current interests focus on health systems governance in low- and middle-income settings, ethics in health systems, and health policy and systems research method - ology. He was a Bellagio scholar-in-residence in 2011 and an Aga Khan Foundation international scholar in 2003–2006. He has a doctorate in health policy from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and training in medicine and infectious disease epidemiology. YAN SHEN is professor of economics at the China Center for Economic Research of Peking University in China. Her research interests include

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462 AGING IN ASIA applied and theoretical econometrics. Her current empirical studies focus on economic development and institutional arrangements in China, par- ticularly in rural finance, and the economic behaviors of Chinese elderly. Her publications appear in the Journal of Applied Econometrics, Economic Development and Cultural Change, the Asia Pacific Journal of Accounting and Economics, and the China Journal of Economics, among others. She is a reviewer for the China Economic Review, Economic Development and Cultural Change, World Development, the International Economic Journal, the China Economic Quarterly, the Journal of Econometrics, and the China Journal of Economics. She has a bachelor’s degree in economics from Peking Univer- sity and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Southern California. SATOSHI SHIMIZUTANI is senior research fellow at the Institute for International Policy Studies. Previously, he worked in the Economic Plan- ning Agency (now called the Cabinet Office) of the Japanese government and also served in a variety of positions, including as associate professor of economics at Hitotsubashi University. His research has focused on the Japanese economy, on which he has written numerous journal articles and published two books in Japanese. He was a principal investigator of the Japanese Study of Retirement and Aging from its inception. He has a B.A. in law from the University of Tokyo and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. BONDAN SIKOKI is director of SurveyMeter, a nongovernment research organization based in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, that carries out large panel surveys. She was the field director for the Indonesian Fertility Survey, the Indonesian Resource Mobilization Study (1993), and the Indonesian Family Life Study (1997–1998) and the co-principal investigator of the Indonesian Family Life Study. She was also field director of the Work and Iron Status Evaluation, a large-scale iron supplementation experi- ment in part of central Java. She directed a longitudinal household and community survey in Aceh to study the impacts and recovery in the aftermath of the 2004 tsunami. Sikoki is co-author of a book on changing Indonesian living standards. Prior to her engagement at SurveyMeter, she held various positions in universities in Nigeria; her last position was assistant director of research and training of the Consultancy Research and Development Centre at the University of Port Harcourt. She has an M.A. in sociology/population studies from the University of Michigan. JAMES P. SMITH holds the RAND chair in labor markets and demo- graphic studies and was the director of RAND’s Labor and Population Studies Program from 1977 to 1994. He has led numerous projects, includ- ing studies of the economics of immigration, the economics of aging,

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463 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS wealth accumulation and savings behavior, the relation of health and economic status, and the causes and consequences of economic growth. For 30 years Smith has worked extensively in Europe and Asia. He cur- rently serves as chair of the National Institute on Aging Data Monitor- ing’s Committee for the Health and Retirement Survey and was chair of the National Science Foundation’s Advisory Committee for the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. He has served as an international adviser on implementing health and retirement surveys in China, India, Korea, Thai- land, Indonesia, continental Europe, and England. He has twice received the National Institutes of Health MERIT Award, the most distinguished honor it grants to a researcher. In 2011, he was elected to the Institute of Medicine. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. JOHN STRAUSS is professor of economics at the University of Southern California. He has more than 30 years of research and survey experience in the developing world, focusing in particular on health, nutrition, and their interactions with various aspects of economic development. His ear- lier work on nutrition and labor productivity in Sierra Leone pioneered the application of methods that can disentangle causality between health and income and led to a large literature on this topic. He is editor-in- chief of Economic Development and Cultural Change and, in 2008, co-edited a major survey and syntheses of scientific research in economic devel - opment, Handbook of Development Economics, Volume 4. He has been the principal investigator of the Indonesia Family Life Survey for Waves 3 and 4 and is co-principal investigator of the China Health and Retire - ment Longitudinal Study. He has held academic positions at Michigan State University, Yale University, and the University of Virginia. He is also affiliated with the RAND Corporation and has an honorary professorship (Chang Jiang scholar) with the National School of Development at Peking University. He has a Ph.D. in economics and agricultural economics from Michigan State University. DEWEN WANG is social protection economist in the World Bank’s Beijing office. His work focuses on China’s social insurance and social assistance programs, labor market dynamics, population aging, and eco- nomic reform and growth. For his work in the Guangdong Province of China, he received a Vice Presidential Unit Team Award from the World Bank in 2009. Prior to joining the World Bank, he was professor and division chief of the Institute of Population and Labor Economics at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. He has also served as a deputy divi- sion director of China’s Ministry of Agriculture and was a research fellow at the Research Center for Rural Economy. He has a Ph.D. in economics from Nanjing Agricultural University.

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464 AGING IN ASIA SHARON R. WILLIAMS is assistant professor of anthropology and a fac- ulty fellow in the Center on Aging and the Life Course at Purdue Univer- sity. Her research interests include understanding how biology, culture, and the environment impact the process of aging and health across the life span and the development of field-based methods for the assessment of biological markers of chronic disease or risk for chronic disease. She has a B.S. in molecular genetics and a Ph.D. in anthropology from Ohio State University. DAVID A. WISE is the Stambaugh professor of political economy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He is also the area director of Health and Retirement Programs and director of the Program on the Economics of Aging at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford Uni- versity. He has written extensively on the determinants of retirement in the United States, in particular the retirement incentives of defined benefit pension plans. For some time, he has been directing an international com- parative project analyzing the effect of public pension program provisions that often induce early retirement from the labor force. He has also writ- ten extensively about the saving effect of personal retirement programs, the market risk of personal accounts compared with the job-change risk of defined benefit pension plans, and the future accumulation of pension assets associated with the conversion from retirement saving through defined benefit plans to saving through 401(k) and other personal retire- ment plans. His current research emphasizes the financial circumstances of retirees with particular reference to the importance of health. He has a B.A. from the University of Washington and an M.A. in statistics and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley. FIRMAN WITOELAR is a research economist at the Development Eco- nomics Research unit of the World Bank in Washington, DC. His research interest is in the area of microeconomics of development and includes such topics as risk sharing, family formation and dissolution, health behavior and outcomes, education, labor market outcomes, and house- hold surveys. Witoelar was involved in the Indonesia Family Life Sur- vey Wave 3 (2000) and was a co-principal investigator of the Indonesia Family Life Survey Wave 4 (2007). He has used this experience to help set up tracking operations and provide training for tracking respondents in other longitudinal household surveys in other countries. He has a B.A. in economics and development studies from the University of Indonesia, an M.A. in economics from Brown University, and a Ph.D. in economics from Michigan State University.

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465 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS LI YANG is associate professor of health economics in the Department of Health Policy and Management of the School of Public Health of Peking University in China. She also serves as a member of the Asia Executive Committee of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Out - comes Research. Her research interests include pharmaceutical policy and pharmacoeconomics, the economic impact of chronic diseases, and aging issues. She has a Ph.D. in health economics from Fudan University in China and has been a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Vienna and a visiting scholar at the Harvard Medical School. YAOHUI ZHAO is professor of economics at the China Center for Eco- nomic Research of Peking University in China and a research fellow at the IZA Institute for the Study of Labor in Bonn, Germany. She is deputy director of the Institute for Social Science Surveys of Peking University. Since 2007, she has been directing the China Health and Retirement Lon- gitudinal Study, a nationally representative sample of Chinese residents aged 45 and older. Her research interests include labor and demographic economics, social security systems pertaining to the elderly, and health economics. She has B.A. and M.A. degrees in economics from Peking University and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. YUHUI ZHENG is a Bell research fellow at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies. Her research interests include the economics of aging, economic incentives and health behaviors, social and economic status and health, and applied econometrics. She has published papers on topics related to food prices and obesity, the impact of accelerated medical technology advance on aging in America, the economics of disease prevention, the effects of pharmacy benefit design, and how neighborhood design impacts walking. She has a B.S. in engi - neering from Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and a Ph.D. in policy analysis from the Pardee RAND Graduate School.

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