Appendix A

Committee Member Biographies

Sandro Galea (Chair) is a professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology of the Mailman School of Public Health of Columbia University. He is a physician and epidemiologist and has conducted large studies in several countries focused on the causes of mental disorders, in particular the role of traumatic events in shaping population health. He is especially interested in the determinants of health in urban populations with regard to the multiple levels of influence of social policies, social environment, and molecular and genetic factors. In addition to being an associate editor of two scientific journals, Dr. Galea is the author of more than 300 journal articles, 50 chapters and commentaries, and five books. Dr. Galea has received several honors, including the William Farr Award in Epidemiology, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Investigator Award, and the John C. Cassel Memorial Lecture. He also serves as a member of the Committee on the Initial Assessment of Readjustment Needs of Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families. Dr. Galea received his DrPH from Columbia University, his MPH from Harvard University, and his MD from the University of Toronto.

Kathryn K. Basham is a Smith College School for Social Work professor, codirector of its PhD program, and editor of its Smith College Studies in Social Work. Her research focuses on couple and family therapy for survivors of childhood trauma and for service members, veterans, and their families. Dr. Basham is interested in addressing the different sources and effects of trauma in male and female combat veterans who have posttrau-matic stress disorder (PTSD) and the effects on the family unit during all



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 379
Appendix A Committee Member Biographies Sandro Galea (Chair) is a professor and chair of the Department of Epide- miology of the Mailman School of Public Health of Columbia University. He is a physician and epidemiologist and has conducted large studies in several countries focused on the causes of mental disorders, in particular the role of traumatic events in shaping population health. He is especially interested in the determinants of health in urban populations with regard to the multiple levels of influence of social policies, social environment, and molecular and genetic factors. In addition to being an associate editor of two scientific journals, Dr. Galea is the author of more than 300 journal articles, 50 chapters and commentaries, and five books. Dr. Galea has re- ceived several honors, including the William Farr Award in Epidemiology, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Investigator Award, and the John C. Cassel Memorial Lecture. He also serves as a member of the Committee on the Initial Assessment of Readjustment Needs of Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families. Dr. Galea received his DrPH from Columbia University, his MPH from Harvard University, and his MD from the University of Toronto. Kathryn K. Basham is a Smith College School for Social Work professor, codirector of its PhD program, and editor of its Smith College Studies in Social Work. Her research focuses on couple and family therapy for sur- vivors of childhood trauma and for service members, veterans, and their families. Dr. Basham is interested in addressing the different sources and effects of trauma in male and female combat veterans who have posttrau- matic stress disorder (PTSD) and the effects on the family unit during all 379

OCR for page 379
380 PTSD IN MILITARY AND VETERAN POPULATIONS phases of the deployment cycle. She has served on two Institute of Medicine (IOM) committees: the Committee on Gulf War and Health: Physiological, Psychologic, and Psychosocial Effects of Deployment-Related Stress and the Committee on Qualifications of Professionals Providing Mental Health Counseling Services Under TRICARE. Dr. Basham recently served on the Steering Committee cosponsored by the Council of Social Work Education to set standards for accredited curricula related to treatment and prevention practices for service members and families affected by military service. In addition to her extensive record of publications and professional presenta- tions, she has received the Distinguished Clinical Practitioner award from the National Academies of Practice. Dr. Basham received her PhD from Smith College. Larry Culpepper is a professor and chairman of family medicine at the Bos- ton University School of Medicine and chief of family medicine at Boston Medical Center. He has conducted federally funded studies of depression and anxiety and is a Primary Care Fellow of the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. He received the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Excellence in Education Award in 1991, the NAPCRG-STFM Career Research Award in 1997, and the North American Primary Care Research Group Maurice Wood Lifetime Research Award in 2010. Dr. Culpepper is an IOM member. He received his MD from Baylor College of Medicine and his MPH from Boston University. Jonathan R. Davidson is an emeritus professor of psychiatry and for 20 years served as director of the Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Program of Duke University Medical Center. He has researched and used psycho- therapy, pharmacotherapy, and holistic approaches to treat people for mental illnesses. His contributions to the understanding of and treatment for anxiety and traumatic stress have been recognized with the American Psychiatric Association Adolf Meyer Research Award, and he is a Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, the Royal College of Psychiatrists, the American Psychopathological Association, and the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. Dr. Davidson has been a member of several advisory boards, committees, National Institute of Mental Health study sections, the National Institutes of Health National Center for Comple- mentary and Alternative Medicine advisory council, and other task forces related to psychiatry, anxiety disorders, and traumatic stress. He has also served as co-chair of the American Psychiatric Association DSM-IV Work Group for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. He has received numerous federal grants to support his research and has been the principal investigator or coinvestigator in more than 70 clinical studies, including a landmark trial of hypericum (St. John’s wort) in depression. Dr. Davidson is a member of

OCR for page 379
381 APPENDIX A the IOM Board on the Health of Select Populations. He received his MD from University College Hospital Medical School, London. Edna B. Foa is a professor of clinical psychology in psychiatry and director of the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety of the University of Pennsylvania. Her academic career has focused on the psychopathology and treatment of anxiety disorders, with an emphasis on obsessive compulsive disorder and PTSD. She has recently been involved in the dissemination of evidence-based treatments for PTSD to community clinics in the United States and abroad. Dr. Foa is recognized as one of the world leaders in the area of anxiety disorders. She developed a theoretical framework called Emotional Processing Theory that delineates the psychological mechanisms of the anxi- ety disorders and their treatments. She also developed prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD, widely acknowledged for its efficacy and effectiveness in a variety of trauma populations. Dr. Foa was the chair of the DSM-IV subcommittee for obsessive compulsive disorder and co-chair the DSM-IV subcommittee for PTSD. She has also been the chair for the Treatment Guidelines Task Force of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Disorders. Dr. Foa has published 18 books and more than 300 research articles and book chapters and has lectured extensively around the world. Her work has been recognized with numerous awards and honors. She was named one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people for 2010. Dr. Foa received her PhD in clinical psychology and personality from the University of Missouri, Columbia. Kenneth W. Kizer is the director of the Institute for Population Health Im- provement at the University of California, Davis, and Target of Excellence professor of the School of Medicine and Betty Irene Moore School of Nurs- ing. His current research interests include health care quality improvement and patient safety, health care transformation, and veterans and military health issues. He formerly served as the undersecretary for health of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, where he was the chief architect of the transformation of the Veterans Health System in the latter 1990s. His other positions have included being the founding president and CEO of the National Quality Forum and director of the California Department of Health Services. Dr. Kizer is an IOM member and has served as a member of numerous committees during the last 25 years, including most recently the IOM Committee on the Readjustment Needs of Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families and the Committee on Smoking Cessation in Military and Veteran Populations. Dr. Kizer is an honors graduate of Stanford University and the University of California, Los Angeles, where he received his MD and MPH.

OCR for page 379
382 PTSD IN MILITARY AND VETERAN POPULATIONS Karestan C. Koenen is a tenured associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology of Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. Her research uses a developmental epidemiologic approach to examine the joint roles of genetic and environmental risk factors, especially those sustained during childhood, in the development and etiology of PTSD. Dr. Koenen is a coinvestigator in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers, the largest study of mental health risk and resilience ever conducted among military personnel. The study is being conducted by the National Institute of Mental Health, which has contracted with the Har- vard School of Public Health. In addition to her teaching and research, Dr. Koenen is an experienced clinician who specializes in empirically validated short-term treatments for PTSD and was a Research Fellow in psychiatric epidemiology. She has received numerous awards for her work, including the Chaim Danieli Young Professional Award for Excellence in Service/ Research in Traumatic Stress from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, the Department of Veterans Affairs Special Contribution Award, and an American Sociological Association Citation Award for work on psychologic risks for U.S. veterans of Vietnam. Dr. Koenen earned her PhD in clinical and developmental psychology from Boston University. Douglas L. Leslie is a health economist and professor of public health sci- ences and psychiatry at the Pennsylvania State University. In addition to his experience in health services, economics, and pharmacoeconomics, he has worked extensively with the Department of Veterans Affairs, in particular with data from its administrative claims database. The primary focus of his research is the effects of managed care and other fiscal pressures on patterns of service use and costs for the mentally ill. Dr. Leslie’s other research inter- ests and expertise include quality of mental health care, adherence to treat- ment guidelines, and the cost-effectiveness of antipsychotic medications. He has published numerous scientific journal articles and has received several awards for his research, including an Excellence in Mental Health Policy and Economics Research Award from the International Center of Mental Health Policy and Economics. Dr. Leslie received his PhD in economics from Yale University. Richard A. McCormick is a senior scholar at the Center for Health Care Research and Policy at Case Western Reserve University MetroHealth Med- ical Center. He served as director of mental health services at Department of Veterans Affairs facilities throughout Ohio and adjoining areas of other states, as a commissioner for the Department of Veterans Affairs Capital Assets Realignment for Enhanced Services Commission, and as co-chair of the Active-Duty Sub-Committee of the Department of Defense Task Force on Mental Health. He is a consultant and scientific board member for two

OCR for page 379
383 APPENDIX A studies of returning National Guard and reserve members and has served as a national consultant for Disabled American Veterans. His research interests include war trauma and related stress reactions and adherence to treatment among the seriously mentally ill who have co-occurring medi- cal problems, alcohol misuse and abuse, and other disorders of impulse control, such as pathologic gambling. Dr. McCormick received his PhD in clinical psychology from Case Western Reserve University. Mohammed Milad is an associate professor in the Department of Psy- chiatry at Harvard Medical School and an associate in research psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, where he is also the director of the Behavioral Neuroscience Laboratory. He is investigating the neural mecha- nisms of fear inhibition in the human brain through the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. His research focuses on the neural circuits of fear extinction and includes the role of meditation in fear modu- lation, the potential use of transcranial magnetic stimulation, and the role of sleep in the consolidation of fear extinction. Dr. Milad also conducts translational research in rodents and humans to examine the influence of estrogen and other gonadal hormones on the neural circuits of fear extinction. He has been awarded the Positive Neuroscience Award by the Templeton Foundation and named a Kavli Fellow by the National Acad- emy of Sciences. Dr. Milad received his PhD in behavioral neuroscience from the Ponce School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Puerto Rico. Elspeth C. Ritchie is the chief clinical officer of the Washington, DC, De- partment of Mental Health. Before joining the department, Colonel Ritchie (retired) served for 5 years as the director of the Proponency of Behavioral Health in the Office of the U.S. Army Surgeon General, and she continues to serve as a psychiatry consultant. She has gained international recogni- tion as an expert in disaster and combat mental health issues and has more than 150 publications, including works on military combat and operational psychiatry, disaster response, and interventions. Col. Ritchie is the senior editor of the Military Medicine Textbook on Combat and Operational Be- havioral Health and the Textbook of Forensic Military Mental Health, and the author of Interventions Following Mass Violence and Disasters: Strate- gies for Mental Health Practice. She has been the recipient of the Bruno Lima Award for Contributions to Psychiatric Care in Times of Disaster and the William C. Porter award from the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States. Col. Ritchie received her MD from George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences and her MPH from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS). She is a professor of psychiatry at the USUHS and on the faculty of Saint Elizabeth’s Hospital.

OCR for page 379
384 PTSD IN MILITARY AND VETERAN POPULATIONS Albert Rizzo started the Laboratory for Virtual Reality, Psychology, Re- habilitation, and Social Neuroscience at the University of Southern Cali- fornia (USC) in 1995 after practicing clinically for 9 years. He is currently an associate director at the USC Institute for Creative Technologies and has appointments as a research professor in the USC Department of Psy- chiatry and at the USC School of Gerontology. Dr. Rizzo’s research focus is on the design, development, and evaluation of virtual reality systems targeting clinical assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation. His projects have involved the creation of a virtual reality exposure-therapy system (Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan) for combat-related PTSD in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom active-duty service members and veterans. He is also working with a team that is creating artificially intel- ligent virtual patients for training novice clinicians in the skills required for challenging clinical interviews and diagnostic assessments (of sexual assault, patient resistance, suicide lethality, etc.). Dr. Rizzo is an editor of a number of cognition and computer-science journals—including Presence, the Journal of Media Psychology, and The International Journal of Virtual Reality—and has published extensively on the topic of clinical virtual real- ity. He received his PhD in clinical psychology from the State University of New York at Binghamton. Barbara O. Rothbaum is a professor of psychiatry and the director of the Trauma and Anxiety Recovery Program and associate vice chair of Clinical Research at Emory University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on innovative cognitive behavioral treatments, including virtual reality, phar- macotherapy, and psychotherapy for PTSD and other anxiety disorders. Dr. Rothbaum has more than 200 publications and two patents and serves as an editorial board member and manuscript reviewer for more than 15 journals. Dr. Rothbaum serves on the Board of Directors of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America and is a past president of the Interna- tional Society for Traumatic Stress Studies. She received her PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Georgia. Douglas F. Zatzick is a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, associate vice chair for health services research, and medical director of the Inpatient Consultation-Liaison Service at the Uni- versity of Washington’s Harborview Medical Center Burn and Trauma Center. Dr. Zatzick was formerly the chief resident in psychiatry at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and completed a Department of Veterans Af- fairs–sponsored Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco. His research focuses on PTSD and co-occurring conditions and on the development of early interventions after traumatic events. Specifically, his work, published in numerous scientific

OCR for page 379
385 APPENDIX A journals, includes clinical epidemiologic studies of ethnoculturally diverse trauma survivors and intervention studies of collaborative-care models to reduce PTSD symptoms and functional disability in physically injured trauma survivors who are treated in trauma-care systems. Dr. Zatzick re- ceived his MD from the University of California, San Diego.

OCR for page 379