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Guest Speaker Biographies

Diana Bauer, Ph.D.

Diana Bauer is Director of the Office of Economic Analysis within the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Policy and International Affairs. In this position, she oversees economic and technology systems analysis. Last year, she led the drafting of DOE’s Critical Materials Strategy. Before joining DOE, she led the extramural sustainability research program at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), focusing on topics such as green manufacturing, green building, transportation, and land use planning. She is one of the principal authors of EPA’s research strategy for sustainability. Previously, she led the Center for Climate Change and Environmental Forecasting at the U.S. Department of Transportation. She has a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from UC Berkeley.

David Bradwell, Ph.D.

David Bradwell is currently a Visiting Scientist at the Sadoway Group, as well as Chief Technical Officer at Liquid Metal Battery Corporation, which is working to commercialize grid-level energy storage. Dr. Bradwell received his B.Sci. in engineering physics from Queen’s University (2005); his M. Eng. in materials sciences and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2006); and his Ph.D. in materials sciences and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2010). Dr. Bradwell’s research projects include high-amperage rechargeable batteries for stationary energy storage applications.

Morris Bullock, Ph.D.

Morris Bullock is a Laboratory Fellow and the Director of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis (efrc.pnnl.gov) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), an Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) funded by the Department of Energy. He received a B.S. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he did undergraduate research with Tom Meyer. He obtained his Ph.D. working for Chuck Casey at the University of Wisconsin. He was a postdoc with Jack Norton at Colorado State University from 1984 to 1985. From 1985 to 2006, he was at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Long Island, New York), where his research focused on organometallic chemistry, involving synthetic, mechanistic, and kinetics studies of transition-metal hydride complexes. Bullock and his co-workers developed catalytic ionic hydrogenations, in which ketones are hydrogenated by proton transfers and hydride transfers from transition-metal hydrides. These catalytic reactions use abundant, inexpensive metals (molybdenum and tungsten) rather than traditional precious metals such as ruthenium. In 2006 he moved to PNNL. The research of the EFRC he directs there focuses on understanding and controlling proton movement in multiproton, multielectron reactions of critical importance to energy transformation reactions needed for a secure energy future. Electrocatalysts are needed for interconversion between electrical energy and chemical energy (fuels). Molecular electrocatalysts based on nickel or iron are being developed for the oxidation of hydrogen and for the production of hydrogen, as alternatives to the use of the precious metal platinum in fuel cells. He recently edited a book, Catalysis Without Precious Metals (Wiley-VCH, 2010).

Jingguang G. Chen, Ph.D.

Jingguang Chen is the Claire D. LeClaire Professor of chemical engineering and co-director of Energy Frontier Research Center at the University of Delaware. He started his career at the Exxon Corporate Research Laboratories in 1989 and moved to the University of Delaware in 1998. He served as the Director of the Center for Catalytic Science and Technology during 2000-2007 and the Interim Director of the University of Delaware Energy Institute during 2008-2010.



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C Guest Speaker Biographies Diana Bauer, Ph.D. North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he did undergraduate research with Tom Meyer. He obtained his Ph.D. working Diana Bauer is Director of the Office of Economic Analysis for Chuck Casey at the University of Wisconsin. He was a within the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Policy and postdoc with Jack Norton at Colorado State University from International Affairs. In this position, she oversees economic 1984 to 1985. From 1985 to 2006, he was at Brookhaven and technology systems analysis. Last year, she led the draft- National Laboratory (Long Island, New York), where his ing of DOE’s Critical Materials Strategy. Before joining research focused on organometallic chemistry, involving DOE, she led the extramural sustainability research program synthetic, mechanistic, and kinetics studies of transition- at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), focus- metal hydride complexes. Bullock and his co-workers ing on topics such as green manufacturing, green building, developed catalytic ionic hydrogenations, in which ketones transportation, and land use planning. She is one of the are hydrogenated by proton transfers and hydride transfers principal authors of EPA’s research strategy for sustain- from transition-metal hydrides. These catalytic reactions use ability. Previously, she led the Center for Climate Change abundant, inexpensive metals (molybdenum and tungsten) and Environmental Forecasting at the U.S. Department of rather than traditional precious metals such as ruthenium. Transportation. She has a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering In 2006 he moved to PNNL. The research of the EFRC he from UC Berkeley. directs there focuses on understanding and controlling proton David Bradwell, Ph.D. movement in multiproton, multielectron reactions of critical importance to energy transformation reactions needed for a David Bradwell is currently a Visiting Scientist at the secure energy future. Electrocatalysts are needed for inter- Sadoway Group, as well as Chief Technical Officer at Liquid conversion between electrical energy and chemical energy Metal Battery Corporation, which is working to commercial- (fuels). Molecular electrocatalysts based on nickel or iron are ize grid-level energy storage. Dr. Bradwell received his B.Sci. being developed for the oxidation of hydrogen and for the in engineering physics from Queen’s University (2005); his production of hydrogen, as alternatives to the use of the pre- M. Eng. in materials sciences and engineering from the cious metal platinum in fuel cells. He recently edited a book, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2006); and his Ph.D. Catalysis Without Precious Metals (Wiley-VCH, 2010). in materials sciences and engineering from the Massachu- setts Institute of Technology (2010). Dr. Bradwell’s research Jingguang G. Chen, Ph.D. projects include high-amperage rechargeable batteries for Jingguang Chen is the Claire D. LeClaire Professor of chemi- stationary energy storage applications. cal engineering and co-director of Energy Frontier Research Morris Bullock, Ph.D. Center at the University of Delaware. He started his career at the Exxon Corporate Research Laboratories in 1989 and Morris Bullock is a Laboratory Fellow and the Director of moved to the University of Delaware in 1998. He served as the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis (efrc.pnnl.gov) at the Director of the Center for Catalytic Science and Tech- Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), an Energy nology during 2000-2007 and the Interim Director of the Frontier Research Center (EFRC) funded by the Depart- University of Delaware Energy Institute during 2008-2010. ment of Energy. He received a B.S. from the University of 55

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56 APPENDIX C Joseph Shinar, Ph.D. He has over 240 journal publications and 16 U.S. patents. He is active in serving the catalysis and energy communi- Joseph Shinar is currently a Senior Physicist of the Ames ties, including responsibilities as the Chair of the Gordon Laboratory, USDOE, Professor and Chair of the Department Research Conference on Catalysis in 2002, the Chair of the of Physics and Astronomy, and Professor of Electrical and Philadelphia Catalysis Club in 2004, the Catalysis Secretariat Computer Engineering at Iowa State University (ISU), Ames, of the American Chemical Society in 2007, and the Board of Iowa. He has co-authored over 250 publications, co-edited Directors of the North American Catalysis Society. 3 volumes, co-invented 5 patents, and delivered over 150 invited talks at national and international conferences, Roderick Eggert, Ph.D. research centers, and universities. In 2004 he was awarded Roderick Eggert received his B.A. in earth sciences from the ISU Foundation Outstanding Achievement in Research Dartmouth College (1978); his M.S. in geochemistry and Award and elected Fellow of the American Physical Society. mineralogy from The Pennsylvania State University (1980); James C. Stevens, Ph.D. and his Ph.D. in mineral economics from The Pennsylvania State University (1983). Dr. Eggert is currently the Director Dr. James C. Stevens is a Corporate Fellow in the Core of the Division of Economics and Business at the Colorado Research and Development Department of The Dow Chemi- School of Mines. He is also a professor within the Division cal Company, where he has worked for 32 years. Jim’s of Economics and Business. Dr. Eggert is a member of the primary field of research is in the area of new catalysts, Advisory Committee of the Mineral Economics Research particularly in the area of polyethylene, polypropylene, Program at Catholic University of Chile. He serves as an edi- ethylene/styrene copolymers, and the high-throughput dis- tor for Resources Policy, an international journal of mineral covery of organometallic single-site catalysts. He has been economics and policy published by Elsevier Science (Oxford, involved with the discovery and commercial implementation of Dow’s INSITE™ technology and constrained-geometry UK). Dr. Eggert is also President of the Mineral Economics and Management Society. Dr. Eggert’s full CV can be found catalysts, which are used in the production of over 2 billion at http://econbus.mines.edu/Rod-Eggert-Professor. pounds of polyolefins and elastomers per year. Dr. Stevens is now working to develop solar energy products and is Christine K. Lambert, Ph.D. involved in the development of Dow’s POWERHOUSE Solar Christine Lambert is currently the Technical Leader at Ford Shingle, which is the first building-integrated photovoltaic Research and Advanced Engineering. Dr. Lambert received product that can be installed by regular roofing contractors. her B.S. in chemical engineering from Lamar University Dr. Stevens is an inventor on 92 issued U.S. patents, over in Beaumont, Texas and her Ph.D. in chemical engineer- 1,100 global patents, 18 publications, and 2 books. Jim has ing from Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana. won a Dow “Inventor of the Year” award five times, and was Dr. Lambert’s current responsibilities at Ford Research presented the Dow Central Research “Excellence in Science” and Advanced Engineering consist of diesel aftertreatment Award. In 1994, Jim was a co-recipient of the U.S. “National catalyst development, including diesel oxidation catalysts, Inventor of the Year” Award, presented in the U.S. Con- lean NOx catalysts, and diesel soot filters, as well as gasoline gress. In 2002, The Dow Chemical Company was awarded particulate filtration. Prior to this assignment, Dr. Lambert the National Medal of Technology by President George led a 5-year DOE-funded project to develop selective cata- Bush, based in part on the work of Dr. Stevens in the area lytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with aqueous urea to dem- of olefin polymerization catalysis. Jim is the 2004 recipient onstrate 2007 federal emission standards with a 6,000-lbs of the ACS Delaware Section “Carothers Award,” honoring light-duty diesel truck. In particular, she worked with sup- scientific innovators who have made outstanding advances pliers to develop highly active and durable SCR catalyst and contributions to industrial chemistry. Jim was awarded formulations. Her team’s work led to the development the American Chemical Society “ACS Award in Industrial of the 2011MY Ford Super Duty Diesel catalyst system. Chemistry” in 2006. Dr. Stevens also received the Herbert Dr. Lambert was recognized in 2009 as a “Young Leader” H. Dow Medal, the highest honor Dow awards to the com- by the Automotive Hall of Fame in Dearborn, Michigan, pany’s scientists and researchers. Jim was awarded the 100th and was also recognized in 2005 by Tulane University with presentation of the Perkin Medal in 2007, widely considered a Harold A. Levey Award, which is presented annually to to be the highest honor in American industrial chemistry. recognize an alumna/us of the Tulane School of Engineering Jim was the 2007 recipient of the University of Chicago for professional achievement during the 5- to 10-year period Bloch Medal and the 2011 North American Catalysis Society after graduation. Dr. Lambert holds eight U.S. patents and is “Houdry Award,” the highest honor of this society. Texas co-author of 65 technical publications and presentations in A&M University has recently honored Dr. Stevens with an the areas of supported metal catalysts and emission control Honorary Doctor of Letters Degree for “innovative research systems for diesel vehicles. which has expanded the boundaries of catalysis, polymer

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57 APPENDIX C chemistry and underlying disciplines, and resulted in large- tion of a novel scalable energy storage device. In 2008 he scale commercial processes.” He is a member of the National founded Aquion Energy, a company that has grown to over Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the AAAS. Jim has 60 employees. He is currently on leave from CMU to serve invented or contributed significantly to the commercializa- as full-time CTO for Aquion as it scales a pilot manufactur- tion of a large number of products, including AFFINITY™ ing plant in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Professor Whitacre has polyolefin plastomers, ENGAGE™ polyolefin elastomers, over 50 peer-reviewed papers and patents. ELITE™ enhanced polyethylene resins, NORDEL™-MG Ken Zweibel, Ph.D. EPDM rubber, NORDEL™-IP elastomers, Dow XLA-fibers, INDEX™ ethylene/styrene copolymers, VERSIFY™ propyl- Ken Zweibel has almost 30 years experience in solar photo- ene copolymers, INFUSE™ Olefin Block Copolymers, and voltaics. He was at the National Renewable Energy Labora- the Dow POWERHOUSE Solar Shingle. There is hardly a tory (Golden, Colorado) much of that time and was the pro- car produced in the world or a grocery store anywhere that gram leader for the Thin Film PV Partnership Program until does not contain a polymer that was invented by Dr. Stevens’ 2006. The Thin Film Partnership worked with most U.S. par- group. Jim received a B.A. in chemistry from The College of ticipants in thin-film photovoltaics (PV) (companies, univer- Wooster in 1975. He obtained a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry sities, scientists) and is often credited with being important from The Ohio State University in 1979. Jim is an advisor to the success of thin-film PV in the United States. Corporate to the National Science Foundation Center for Chemical participants in the Partnership included First Solar, UniSolar, Innovation, Solar Fuels based at Caltech. Global Solar, Shell Solar, BP Solar, and numerous others. Zweibel subsequently co-founded and became President Jay Whitacre, Ph.D. of a thin-film CdTe PV startup, PrimeStar Solar, a majority Jay Whitacre received a PhD. from the University of share of which was purchased by General Electric. Zweibel Michigan in 1999. He held various positions at Caltech and became the founding Director of The George Washington the Jet Propulsion Lab before taking his current professor- University Solar Institute at its formation in 2008. Zweibel is ship at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) in 2007. There frequently published and known worldwide in solar energy. he develops functional materials systems and performs He has written two books on PV and co-authored a Scientific economic/environmental impact assessment for energy American article (January 2008) on solar energy as a solution technologies. His early work at CMU resulted in the concep- to climate change and energy problems.

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