Appendix B

Biographies of Speakers

GRACE BOCHENEK

Dr. Grace M. Bochenek was appointed Director of the U.S. Army’s Research, Development and Engineering Command’s (RDECOM’s) Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) in August 2006. TARDEC is located Warren, MI, and is recognized as the ground vehicle center of excellence and the premier laboratory for advanced military automotive technology for ground vehicle systems and logistics support equipment. A recipient of the Meritorious Executive Presidential Rank Award in 2008, Dr. Bochenek brings over 23 years of scientific, technical and managerial experience to this preeminent Army institution. She creates and leads all research, development and engineering strategies for the Department of Defense’s Ground Vehicle Manned and Unmanned systems with military impact worldwide. In this role, she oversees an annual budget of over $500 million in research and development funds as part of the annual $24 billion Department of Army Ground Vehicle and Logistical System investment plan. She manages a workforce of over 1,200 government civilian, military and contractor employees and sets strategic direction for a full range of investments that affect over 270 Army systems.

Prior to this assignment, Dr. Bochenek served as Deputy Program Executive Officer (DPEO) for Combat Support and Combat Service Support (CS&CSS). As DPEO, she led over 400 civilian personnel, 3 Project Management Offices, 18 managers, 250 ACAT III programs in five geographically distributed sites supporting the Army’s tactical wheeled vehicle fleet and force projection commodities. Additionally in this role, Dr. Bochenek provided scientific and technical leadership, developed innovative programs for engineering career development, guided decisions on all milestone decision authority acquisition documents and advised civilian senior leadership on the development of the Army’s Truck Modernization program, the Army’s Long Term Armor Strategy,

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As of July 2010. Appendix includes bios distributed at the symposium.



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Appendix B Biographies of Speakers GRACE BOCHENEK Dr. Grace M. Bochenek was appointed Director of the U.S. Army's Research, Development and Engineering Command's (RDECOM's) Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) in August 2006. TARDEC is located Warren, MI, and is recognized as the ground vehicle center of excellence and the premier laboratory for advanced military automotive technology for ground vehicle systems and logistics support equipment. A recipient of the Meritorious Executive Presidential Rank Award in 2008, Dr. Bochenek brings over 23 years of scientific, technical and managerial experience to this preeminent Army institution. She creates and leads all research, development and engineering strategies for the Department of Defense's Ground Vehicle Manned and Unmanned systems with military impact worldwide. In this role, she oversees an annual budget of over $500 million in research and development funds as part of the annual $24 billion Department of Army Ground Vehicle and Logistical System investment plan. She manages a workforce of over 1,200 government civilian, military and contractor employees and sets strategic direction for a full range of investments that affect over 270 Army systems. Prior to this assignment, Dr. Bochenek served as Deputy Program Executive Officer (DPEO) for Combat Support and Combat Service Support (CS&CSS). As DPEO, she led over 400 civilian personnel, 3 Project Management Offices, 18 managers, 250 ACAT III programs in five geographically distributed sites supporting the Army's tactical wheeled vehicle fleet and force projection commodities. Additionally in this role, Dr. Bochenek provided scientific and technical leadership, developed innovative programs for engineering career development, guided decisions on all milestone decision authority acquisition documents and advised civilian senior leadership on the development of the Army's Truck Modernization program, the Army's Long Term Armor Strategy, As of July 2010. Appendix includes bios distributed at the symposium. 181

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182 U.S. BATTERY INDUSTRY FOR ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLES and the Army's Future Tactical Truck Systems program. Dr. Bochenek's leadership also ensured the alignment of PEO goals with Army goals by developing and implementing the Strategic Readiness System Balanced Score Card metrics to meet organizational and programmatic goals. Prior to PEO CS&CSS, Dr. Bochenek was appointed to the Senior Executive Service as the Executive Director of Research and Technical Director for RDECOM- TARDEC. There, she led programs to align all ground-based systems science and technology research objectives to meet the Army's future warfighting and logistics needs including vehicle survivability, robotics, vehicle electronics, hybrid electric, alternative power and energy, and software engineering. In this dual-hatted role, she also was responsible for Science and Technology strategic planning, program selection, resource management, policy development, professional leadership and organizational liaison with the Director. She was also responsible for developing cooperative programs and agreements with industry, academia and other government agencies that facilitate exchange of technical intelligence. RALPH BRODD Ralph James Brodd is the new Director of the Kentucky-Argonne National Battery Manufacturing Research and Development Center. The center is a partnership among Argonne National Laboratory, the Commonwealth of Kentucky, the University of Louisville and the University of Kentucky. Brodd is also the President of Broddarp of Nevada, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in technology assessment, strategic planning and battery technology, production, and marketing. He received a B.A. degree in chemistry from Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in physical chemistry from the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Brodd began his career at the National Bureau of Standards in Washington, D.C., studying electrode reactions and phenomena that occur in battery operation. He taught physical chemistry in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Graduate School and lectured in electrochemistry at Georgetown University and American University. In the 1960s and 1970s, Dr. Brodd served in a variety of technical and management capacities with a number of battery companies. In 1961, Dr. Brodd joined the L.T.V. research Center of Ling Temco Vought, Inc., in Dallas, Texas, where he established a group in fuel cells and batteries. In 1963, he moved to the Battery Products Technology Center of Union Carbide Corporation, with technical management responsibilities for nickel-cadmium and lead acid rechargeable batteries, alkaline and carbon-zinc product lines, and exploratory R&D. He joined ESB (INCO Electroenergy, Inc.) in 1978, establishing a technology surveillance group, and moving to the position of Director of Technology with oversight and policy responsibility for R&D

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APPENDIX B 183 laboratories serving product areas ranging from primary and secondary batteries to uninterruptible power supplies and small electric motors. He was a member of the INCO Long Range Technology Committee and the technical advisory panel for North America Capital Venture Fund. In 1982, Dr. Brodd established Broddarp, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in battery technology, strategic planning, and technology planning. A consultancy with Amoco led to his moving to Amoco Research Center as project manager of a rechargeable lithium sulfur dioxide battery project. He subsequently moved to Gould, Inc., to establish their Lithium Powerdex Battery Venture and then to Valence Technology, a venture group developing a solid polymer electrolyte battery system for rechargeable batteries for portable consumer devices. He served as staff consultant/marketing director and then Vice President, Marketing. Dr. Brodd was elected President of The Electrochemical Society in 1981 and Honorary Member in 1987. He was elected National Secretary of the International Society of Electrochemistry, 1977-1982, and Vice President, 1981- 1983. He is past chairman of the Board of Directors of the International Battery Materials Association. Dr. Brodd was President of the Pi chapter of Phi Lambda Upsilon. Dr. Brodd has served on numerous technical advisory and review committees for the National Research Council, International Electrotechnic Commission, DOE, NASA, and NIH government laboratories and technical programs, most recently as a member of the 1999 and 2004 Review Committee for the Environmental Energy Technologies Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr. Brodd has over 100 publications and patents. PATRICK DAVIS Patrick Davis is the Program Manager of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program Office at the U. S. Department of Energy. The Vehicle Technologies Program supports over $200 million in annual research funding for hybrid drivetrains, advanced batteries, lightweight materials, advanced combustion and fuels, vehicle systems integration, and deployment activities. He is responsible for two major government industry partnerships, the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership and the 21st Century Truck Partnership. He also serves on the Board of Directors of the American National Standards Institute. Formerly he served as a senior advisor for transportation technologies in the office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and as DOE coordinator of the President's 20-in-10 Initiative to reduce gasoline usage in the United States by 20 percent in the next 10 years. He previously served as the Acting Program Manager of the Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies, Team Leader for Hydrogen Production, Team Leader for Fuel Cell Technology, co-chair for two FreedomCAR and Fuel

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184 U.S. BATTERY INDUSTRY FOR ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLES Partnership Technical Teams, and the U.S. representative to the International Energy Agency's Hydrogen Implementing Agreement. Mr. Davis is a Chemical Engineer with 25 years of experience in the development of vehicle, alternative fuel, and electrochemical technologies. JASON FORCIER Jason Forcier has served as Vice President of our Automotive Solutions Group since August 2009. Prior to A123 Systems Mr. Forcier was named VP and GM of Lear's Global electronics business in August, 2008. Mr. Forcier served as regional president, automotive electronics for Robert Bosch LLC since April of 2007. In this position, Forcier was responsible for operations of Bosch's North American automotive electronics business. He previously held the position of president and CEO of ETAS, Inc., a Bosch subsidiary. Mr. Forcier joined ETAS in 1997, where he was manager of engineering service. He has held various other assignments at ETAS, including a product line manager, manager of customer value teams and vice president of automotive embedded control tools. Prior to joining ETAS, Mr. Forcier worked in marketing at DSP Technologies and as a systems engineer at Delphi Automotive. Mr. Forcier earned his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the GMI Engineering & Management Institute (now Kettering University) and a master's degree in business administration from the University of Michigan. He has been a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers since 1990 and has participated in two previous panels at the SAE AVL Theater. Additionally, he has participated in A World in Motion, sponsored by the SAE Foundation. LINDA GAINES Linda Gaines is a Systems Analyst at the Center for Transportation Research at Argonne National Laboratory. She holds a B.A. in Chemistry and Physics from Harvard and a Ph.D. in Physics from Columbia. Her primary interest is in problem solving, applied to efficient use of resources. She began her 30+ years at Argonne by writing a series of handbooks of energy and material flows in the petroleum refining, organic chemicals, and copper industries that provided background for studies of technical and institutional issues involved in recycling discarded tires, packaging, and other energy-intensive materials. Dr. Gaines has examined the costs and impacts on energy use and the environment of production and recycling of advanced-design automobiles, trucks, and trains, and batteries. She has also examined the potential growth of electricity demand by industry and performed technical and economic analysis of alternative fuels,

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APPENDIX B 185 including hydrogen and biofuels. Her most recent work has involved studying ways to reduce petroleum use and other impacts from transport by recycling of batteries and also by reducing vehicle idling. NANCY GIOIA Nancy Lee Gioia is Ford Motor Company's Director of Global Electrification. Appointed to this position Oct. 9, 2009, Gioia directs strategy and planning for the next generation of Ford's global electric vehicle portfolio, touching all aspects of electrified transportation, including product planning, supplier partnerships and collaboration with the energy industry and government. Prior to taking her current role, Gioia was Ford's director of Sustainable Mobility Technology and Hybrid Vehicle Programs for North America, overseeing research, development and ultimately deployment of other sustainable mobility technologies such as hydrogen internal combustion engines and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. Earlier in her career with Ford, Gioia was director of Current Model Vehicle Quality for North America where she was responsible for overall current model quality performance. Gioia has held several key management and executive positions within Ford Product Development, including valuable experience in electronics architecture design and integration in vehicles. She also was chief engineer for the Ford Aeromax class-8 truck line and the 2002 Ford Thunderbird program. She went on to direct engineering for all Ford, Lincoln and Mercury passenger cars in North America before taking on her current assignment. Gioia joined Ford Motor Company in 1982 as a graduate trainee in the Electronics division. From 1983 to 1986, she held various positions in the division's Powertrain Business unit. In June 1986, she became manufacturing and quality engineer at the Engine Control Electronics facility in Lansdale, Pa. Her manufacturing experience continued in management positions in the organization, including the launch of Ford's new facility in Cadiz, Spain in 1989. In June 1991, Gioia was named alliance manager for the Electronics division, responsible for the management, development and growth of more than 18 strategic alliances. In February 1993, she became Manufacturing and Materials Planning and Logistics manager, and, later that year, manager of assembly operations in the Climate Control division at Ford's Plymouth, Mich. plant. Beginning in August 1994, Gioia took on a number of key assignments as engineering chief for several vehicle nameplates and platforms. She was named chief engineer Commercial Truck, Automotive Components division and in

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186 U.S. BATTERY INDUSTRY FOR ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLES February 1996 was appointed chief program engineer for the Louisville/Aeromax truck line. She then served as chief program engineer for the all-new 2002 Ford Thunderbird, delivering the vehicle from concept to production. Gioia combines her hands-on and management experience in electronics architectures, manufacturing, vehicle engineering, vehicle program management, quality engineering systems and executive direction to the Sustainable Mobility Technology and Hybrid Vehicle Programs group. This position includes direction of scientists working in Ford's Research and Innovations Center developing tomorrow's propulsion solutions and direction of a product engineering group applying and integrating new technologies into products for consumers today and in the future. Gioia received her bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan and her master of sciences in manufacturing systems engineering from Stanford University. While studying with the assistance of a Ford Advanced Education Fellowship, she received the Outstanding Service Award from the Stanford Institute for Manufacturing and Automation. In July 2001, she received the All Star Award from Automotive News and in 2005 she was named one of Automotive News' "100 Leading Women in the Auto Industry." She remains an active member of the Stanford University Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing (former chair) and is a board member of Auto Alliance International. MARY GOOD Dr. Mary L. Good, founding Dean and Donaghey Professor, is well known for her distinguished career. She has held many high-level positions in academia, industry, and government. The 143,000-member American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) elected Dr. Good to serve as the president, following Dr. Stephen Jay Gould. In 2004, Dr. Good was recipient of the National Science Foundation's highest honor, the Vannevar Bush Award. She was also the first female winner of the AAAS's prestigious Philip Hogue Abelson prize for outstanding achievements in education, research and development management, and public service, spanning the academic, industrial, and government sectors. Two of her more than 27 awards include the National Science Foundation Distinguished Service medal and the esteemed American Chemical Society Priestly Medal. She is also the 6th Annual Heinz Award Winner. During the terms of Presidents Carter and Reagan, Dr. Good served on the National Science Board and chaired it from 1988-1991. She was the Undersecretary for Technology in the U.S. Department of Commerce and Technology during President Clinton's first term. This agency assists American industry to advance productivity, technology, and innovation in order to make

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APPENDIX B 187 U.S. companies more competitive in the global market. Dr. Good has received 21 honorary degrees. Her undergraduate degree in chemistry is from the University of Central Arkansas. She earned her doctoral degree in inorganic chemistry from the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, at age 24. Dr. Good spent 25 years teaching and researching at Louisiana State University and the University of New Orleans before becoming a guiding force in research and development for Allied Signal. Dr. Good was voted one of Arkansas' Top 100 Women by Arkansas Business. WILLIAM HARRIS Dr. Harris is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Science Foundation Arizona (SFAz). Prior to joining SFAz, Dr. William C. Harris was in Ireland serving as director general of Science Foundation Ireland (SFI), a new Irish agency that helped facilitate tremendous growth in Ireland's R&D sector during Harris' tenure. Immediately prior to going to Ireland, Dr. Harris was vice president of research and professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of South Carolina (USC). There, he oversaw research activities throughout the USC system, several interdisciplinary centers and institutes, the USC Research Foundation and sponsored research programs. Dr. Harris served at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) from 1978 to 1996, including as the director for mathematical and physical sciences (1991- 1996). He was responsible for federal grants appropriation of $750 million. He also established 25 Science and Technology Centers to support investigative, interdisciplinary research by multi-university consortia. Earlier in his career, he catalyzed the Research Experience for Undergraduates program in the chemistry division and it became an NSF-wide activity. In 2005, Dr. Harris was elected a member of the Irish Royal Academy, and received the Wiley Lifetime Achievement Award from California Polytechnic State University. He has authored more than 50 research papers and review articles in spectroscopy and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Harris earned his undergraduate degree at the College of William and Mary, and received his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of South Carolina. DAVID HOWELL Mr. Dave Howell is the Team Lead for the Hybrid Electric Systems Team at the Office of Vehicle Technologies Program, U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters, in Washington DC. Earlier, he was Manager, Electrochemical Energy Storage Research and Development, a position that he had been in since

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188 U.S. BATTERY INDUSTRY FOR ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLES 2003. For the past 6 years he has also served as the DOE Co-Chair of the FreedomCAR Electrochemical Energy Storage Tech Team. Dave was a member of the research staff of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee for 12 years prior to joining DOE. At ORNL, he served as Project Manager for Aerospace Technologies. His primary focus was the development of advanced materials and processing techniques for aerospace structures. Dave served on active duty for 6 years at Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio. Dave was assigned as the Program Manager for Advanced Materials for Space Structures at the Air Force Materials Laboratory. In that role, he managed the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization's Advanced Materials for Space Structures Program supporting advanced materials R&D for spacecraft structures and mechanisms. Dave received a Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering in 1985 from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. ROBERT KAMISCHKE Robert Kamischke serves the Ener1 team as EnerDel's CFO, Controller, and CIO. His financial leadership and strategic planning acumen has played an instrumental role in EnerDel's rapid transformation from technology start-up firm to a full commercial volume producer of Lithium Ion Battery Energy Storage Systems. Kamischke brings a breadth of experience from an award winning career where he led high performance teams for several leading automotive organizations. Most recently, Robert had a distinguished career at General Motors where his range of assignments were as diverse as leading all finance activities at the Pontiac, MI, full-size truck assembly plant to creating and implementing the GM Service Parts Accessory Distributor network. Robert notably served as Director of Finance and Strategy for the storied GM EV1 components business unit which developed the Electric Drive Train and Battery Energy Storage Systems in the mid 1990s. Whether it is operations, manufacturing, treasury, information systems, venture development, sales, marketing or distribution; Robert has continuously been on the leading edge of innovation while seamlessly employing sound management principals and common sensibility to drive organization success. Robert holds a Bachelor's degree in Accounting from Northern Michigan University and an MS in Manufacturing Management from Kettering University.

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APPENDIX B 189 SRIDHAR KOTA Dr. Sridhar Kota is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor where he has been involved in teaching and research in Design and Manufacturing area for 23 years. He is currently on leave from the U of M serving as the Assistant Director for Advanced Manufacturing at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. He has authored over 200 technical papers, holds 25 patents and served as an engineering consultant to numerous organizations in manufacturing, automotive, aerospace and MEMS fields. He is the recipient of the ASME Machine Design Award and the ASME Leonardo Da Vinci award. He is the founding President and CEO of FlexSys Inc. a small business engaged in bio-inspired design of aircraft wings, wind turbine blades and automotive systems. Kota's research was featured in New York Times, Discovery Channel, Science News, Aviation Week, Popular Science, and other popular press. In his current role at OSTP, Dr. Kota coordinates Federal advanced manufacturing R&D across agencies and addresses issues related to R&D funding gaps, manufacturing competitiveness, technology development and commercialization. BOB KRUSE Bob Kruse is the Founding Principal of EV Consulting LLC and the former Executive Director of global vehicle engineering for hybrids, electric vehicles and batteries at General Motors. As part of GM's commitment to fuel diversity, Kruse's division addresses strategic national interests and climate change risk by developing innovative vehicle design, reshaping the workforce and forging partnerships both inside and outside the automotive industry. He and his team have played a key role in developing the Volt, an electric hybrid vehicle being developed by GM. Kruse holds a bachelor's degree from Missouri University of Science and Technology and a master's in management from MIT's Sloan School. He led the development of all parts and subsystems for vehicles and general assembly engineering, as well as global powertrain integration, where he was responsible for the first hybrid powertrain developed for full-size trucks. Kruse went on to direct vehicle integration engineering, which created some the best automobiles in GM's history, such as the new Chevy Malibu, Buick Enclave, Cadillac CTS and the current generation of full-size trucks. He also led the performance division that executed award-winning vehicles during his tenure, including the second-generation Cadillac CTS-V, the Chevy Cobalt and HHR turbo SS.

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190 U.S. BATTERY INDUSTRY FOR ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLES Kruse's team has also developed the largest automotive advanced technology battery lab in the world in Warren, Mich., and helped establish the Advanced Battery Coalition of Drivetrains laboratory at the University of Michigan. Together, the two facilities partner in a wide range of work, including addressing critical workforce shortage issues. Under Kruse, GM also partners with the University of Michigan to offer master's-level online distance learning for engineers studying electrification technologies. ANDY LEVIN As a Department of Labor & Economic Growth Deputy Director and Chief Workforce Officer for the State of Michigan, Andy Levin oversees a number of bureaus, including: Workforce Programs, Career Education, Labor Market Information & Strategic Initiatives, Michigan Rehabilitation Services, the Michigan Commission for the Blind and Michigan Commission on Disability Concerns. Levin has brought a wealth of experience in workplace and labor-management programs and policy to DLEG. At the national AFL-CIO, the U.S. Department of Labor, and the Presidential Commission on the Future of Worker- Management Relations, Levin helped create programs and lead innovative policy campaigns to improve economic security for working families and create business-labor partnerships. In addition, Levin's experience studying and working in Haiti, India, and China has brought additional strength to the Governor's efforts to attract business to Michigan from all over the world. Levin started his career advocating for nursing home workers throughout Michigan, and he has extensive experience in the fast-growing health care industry, where the need to match workers to good jobs is acute. He is currently Of Counsel at the Southfield law firm of Klimist, McKnight, Sale, McClow, and Canzano, P.C. Levin is a long-time champion for diversifying Michigan's economy, greatly increasing production and use of renewable energy, and providing excellent education and health care for all. Andy Levin is the son of U.S. Representative Sander Levin and the nephew of U.S. Senator Carl Levin. A Berkley native, he currently lives in Bloomfield Township with his wife, Mary Freeman, and their four young children. He earned a Bachelor's degree from Williams College, a Masters degree in Asian Languages and Cultures from the University of Michigan's Rackham Graduate School and a Law degree from Harvard University.

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APPENDIX B 191 CARL LEVIN Carl Levin is the senior US Senator from Michigan. In an editorial about Carl Levin, the Detroit News wrote, "He has been above reproach personally and has stuck to his principles, even when they were unpopular. Principled leadership, no matter what political ideology it comes from, is sorely needed in Washington." TIME Magazine recently named Carl Levin one of "America 's 10 Best Senators," noting that "the Michigan Democrat has gained respect from both parties for his attention to detail and deep knowledge of policy." Carl Levin has worked to strengthen Michigan's industrial economy. Levin proposed the American Manufacturing Initiative to ensure that our government aggressively fights for manufacturing in America so our manufacturers and workers can compete globally on a level playing field. American manufacturers are not competing against foreign companies; they are competing against foreign governments. As a co-chair of the Senate Auto Caucus and the Senate Auto Parts Task Force, Levin has been one of the most insistent voices in Washington calling for strong action to open the world's markets to American goods. Levin has been a longtime advocate of programs that provide for joint government-industry partnerships in development of advanced vehicle technologies. These efforts led to the growth of the Army's National Automotive Center in Warren, Michigan, which has played an important role in developing advanced technologies for military use, often in conjunction with the private sector. As co-chair of the Senate Great Lakes Task Force, Levin has fought to protect the environmental treasures of "the Great Lakes State," an irreplaceable natural resource for Michigan and the country. In 1990, Levin authored the Great Lakes Critical Programs Act to create new standards of environmental protection for Great Lakes waters. Levin also helped win passage of the Great Lakes Legacy Program in 2002 to clean up contaminated sediments, and he worked to secure funding to deal with foreign aquatic invasive species including zebra mussels, milfoil and Asian carp. A strong advocate for the creation of the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, Levin has obtained significant funding for it and introduced legislation in 2009 to expand the boundaries of the sanctuary to more than eight times its current size. The expansion would help preserve "Shipwreck Alley" for divers and historians, where dozens of ships sank in the waters of Lake Huron. Carl Levin is the Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, where he has earned a reputation as a strong supporter of our national defense, a tireless advocate on behalf of our service men and women, and an effective fighter against wasteful government spending. Senator Levin has championed efforts to reduce the threats to our nation and the world from the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the threats posed by terrorism. He supports the efforts of

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194 U.S. BATTERY INDUSTRY FOR ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLES the enactment of legislation to detect and stop money laundering and terrorist financing. Levin is also a member of the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee and an ex officio member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. Carl Levin believes we must expand educational opportunities for all Americans if our nation is to remain strong and productive. He has fought for increased funding for the Head Start preschool program, Title I for educationally disadvantaged students, and Pell Grants and loans for college and vocational school students. Senator Levin has been a strong advocate for the effective use of technology in K-12 schools and helped create the Consortium for Outstanding Achievement in Teaching with Technology, a groundbreaking Michigan partnership helping teachers master technology skills. He has been an enthusiastic supporter of School to Work programs, which have created a public-private partnership to prepare students for the demands of the modern workplace. He has won critical federal support for the Focus: HOPE Center for Advanced Technology, a world-class manufacturing training facility in Detroit. Addiction to illegal drugs continues to plague our society. Senator Levin authored a provision in the Drug Abuse and Treatment Act of 2000 to enable qualified physicians to prescribe and dispense from their private offices - rather than centralized clinics revolutionary, new anti-addiction medications such as buprenorphine that suppress the craving for heroin. Carl Levin was born in 1934 in Detroit, where he graduated from Central High School. In 1956, he graduated with honors from Swarthmore College and graduated from Harvard University Law School in 1959. He practiced and taught law in Michigan until 1964 when he was appointed an assistant attorney general of Michigan and the first general counsel for the Michigan Civil Rights Commission. He then helped establish the Detroit Public Defender's Office and led the Appellate Division of that office, which has become the State Appellate Defender's Office. He won election to the Detroit City Council in 1969, becoming its president in 1973 by winning the most votes citywide. In 1978, he won an upset victory over the number two Republican in the U.S. Senate. He was reelected in 1984, 1990, 1996, 2002 and 2008. GREG MAIN Greg Main is President and CEO of the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, the State of Michigan's lead economic development agency, and is responsible for executing Governor Granholm's economic development strategy. From 2003 through June 2008, Mr. Main served as President and CEO

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APPENDIX B 195 of i2E, Inc. of Oklahoma City, a leading technology commercialization program, with responsibility for directing efforts to assist start-up companies in attracting risk capital and securing private equity funding. From 1998 to 2002, he was a general partner with Chisholm Private Capital Partners, a $66 million venture capital firm in Oklahoma City and beginning in 1994, a partner in Intersouth Partners of Research Triangle, N.C. Appointed as Oklahoma Secretary of Commerce in 1991 after a national search to lead the state's recovery from the oil bust, Mr. Main served as the state's chief economic development officer, administering a $90 million budget encompassing 180 employees. He designed and implemented initiatives including the award-winning Oklahoma Quality Jobs program and Quality Jobs Investment Act. In addition, he was instrumental in establishing the Alliance for Manufacturing and the launch of the Oklahoma Capital Investment Board Venture Investing program. Mr. Main, a Michigan native, began his economic development career as executive director and chief planner for the six-county, nonprofit Central Upper Peninsula Planning and Development Regional Commission (CUPPAD) in Escanaba for 13 years beginning in 1970. He joined the Michigan Department of Commerce as director of the Upper Peninsula office in 1983. From 1985 to 1990, his duties as director of the manufacturing development group included responsibility for marketing Michigan as a location for manufacturing investment. In that capacity, he directed State of Michigan offices in Brussels, Tokyo, Toronto and Lagos, Nigeria. He was deputy director of economic development in 1991 when he relocated to Oklahoma. Mr. Main was born in Belding, Michigan and grew up in Lansing. He graduated summa cum laude from Michigan State University in 1970 with a degree in urban planning. He has extensive training and post-graduate studies in general management, marketing management, business and real estate finance, sales and quality management. He is past chairman and president of the Oklahoma Venture Forum; Science Museum Oklahoma board member; Oklahoma Academy executive committee member; and Creative Oklahoma board member. JOHN PELLEGRINO Dr. John M. Pellegrino is the Director of the Sensors & Electron Devices Directorate (SEDD) of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL). Dr. Pellegrino holds a bachelor's degree in Physics from Gordon College, Boston, MA and Master's and a Doctoral degree in Physics from the University of Wisconsin Madison. Prior to his appointment in September 1998 to the Director, SEDD, Dr. Pellegrino was the Chief, Electro-Optics and Acoustics Division and Associate Director for Sensors Research. He also served as Chief, ARL Signal and Information Processing Division, and Chief, Optical Processing Branch, Harry

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196 U.S. BATTERY INDUSTRY FOR ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLES Diamond Laboratories. He began his professional career as a Physicist in September 1981 at the Harry Diamond Laboratories. Dr. Pellegrino serves as the Chair of the RDECOM Sensors and Power & Energy Technology Focus Teams. He regularly serves by invitation as conference chair, technical consultant for various programs, and as a member of various advisory boards and committees. These include serving as a member of the SPIE Board of Directors, Chair of the SPIE Symposia Committee, Chair of the Office of Secretary of Defense Energy and Power Technologies Initiative, Army member of the Defense Department Advisory Group on Electron Devices, and conferences and studies on sensors and sensor networking. Dr. Pellegrino is a fellow of the International Optical Engineering Society (SPIE), and a Senior Member of the IEEE; he also a member of AAAS, Sigma Xi, and the Optical Society of America. He is recipient of the 2009 Meritorious Presidential Rank Award; twice recipient of the U.S. Army Research and Development Achievement Award (1994 & 1997), and a recipient of the Harry Diamond Laboratories Hinman Award for Technical Achievement (1986). He has authored and co-authored more than two dozen technical papers and reports, and is co-editor of the book Acousto-Optic Signal Processing. MICHAEL REED Michael "Mike" Reed joined Magna in April, 2009 as General Manager Battery Divisions with responsibility for the start-up of Magna's North American lithium ion battery cell and pack manufacturing. He has over 40 years experience in the battery industry in various technical, operational and general management roles. His international experience includes transitioning advanced technology products and manufacturing from research and development to commercialization. Prior to joining Magna, Mike served as President, Chief Executive Officer and member of the Board of Directors of Electro Energy Inc. an advanced battery technology company serving military and aerospace markets with significant R&D funding from the US Department of Defense and Department of Energy. Earlier at EaglePicher, he served as Chief Operating Officer of EaglePicher Horizon Batteries, LLC, where he directed the start-up of an advanced technology battery facility in Beijing, China. At Johnson Controls, Mike served as Director of Engineering for the Battery Group and then expatriate General Manager of South American Battery Operations headquartered in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Before that, Mike held several technical, operations and general management positions at Exide Corporation and Delco Remy Division of General Motors Corporation.

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APPENDIX B 197 Mike holds a BSChE in chemical engineering from Purdue University and a MBA from Indiana University. ANN MARIE SASTRY With expertise in numerical simulation and advanced materials characterization and design, Dr. Ann Marie Sastry's teams work in applied energy technologies, and on fundamental problems in applied mathematics, biology, and electrochemistry. In education and workforce issues, Sastry has led development of novel curricula to address critical national energy needs. Sastry and her collaborators have published over 60 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters, and she has delivered over 50 invited seminars at academic institutions and organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences and the National Institute of Health. Her work has featured in Nature, Business Week, and other publications. In energy technologies, her laboratory has developed new materials, invented techniques for the manufacture and optimization of batteries, and algorithms for optimization of power systems. Her laboratory's projects, sponsored by General Motors, the DoE, the Army Research Office, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, NSF, the Keck Foundation, and the Ford Motor Company, include numerical simulation of performance of Li batteries for electric vehicles, design of microbatteries for implantable systems, creation of biological batteries comprised of cellular organelles coupled with engineered substrates, and modeling of fully integrated structural batteries for realization of multifunctional, composite materials. Sastry's laboratory partners with university, national laboratory, and industrial workers to address problems of societal significance. These strategic partnerships include the GM/UM Advanced Battery coalition for Drivetrains, a center founded to speed technology insertion of storage technologies into electric vehicles, using advanced simulation, experimentation, optimization, and controls of batteries. Sastry holds MS and PhD degrees from Cornell University, and a BS from the University of Delaware, all in Mechanical Engineering. She is the recipient of numerous honors for her work, including the 2007 ASME Gusts Larson Award, the University of Delaware Presidential Citation for Outstanding Achievement (2004), the UM college of Engineering 1938E (2000), the University of Michigan Harry Russel Award (1999), and NSF's Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and engineers (1997). In 2005, she was honored with a University of Michigan Faculty Recognition Award, acknowledging outstanding contributions as a senior faculty member in research, teaching and service. She has served on three Editorial Boards: the ASME Journal of Engineering

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198 U.S. BATTERY INDUSTRY FOR ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLES Materials and Technologies, Journal of Composite Materials, and as a Founding Associate Editor of the Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials. SUJAI SHIVAKUMAR Dr. Sujai Shivakumar is a Senior Program Officer at the National Academies Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy. He conducts a portfolio of research on national policies that advance science, technology, and innovation. This includes a review of high technology public-private partnerships in the United States, an analysis of the drivers of productivity growth in the New Economy, and an assessment of national innovation policies in both developed and emerging economies. Before joining the National Academies, Dr. Shivakumar conducted post- doctoral research at Indiana University's Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis. He participated in a major study led by Elinor Ostrom on the role of incentives in the structure of development aid. An expert in the field of Constitutional Political Economy, Dr. Shivakumar has also advised the governments of Somaliland and Nepal on institution building and the development of sustainable national constitutions. Dr. Shivakumar is the author of The Constitution of Development, Crafting Capabilities for Self-Governance, published by Macmillan, and The Samaritans' Dilemma, The Political Economy of Development Aid, coauthored with Elinor Ostrom, Clark Gibson, and Krister Andersson, and published by Oxford University Press. He is also co-editor with Charles Wessner of a National Research Council report on India's Changing Innovation System. DANIEL SPERLING Daniel Sperling is Professor of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science and Policy, and founding Director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California, Davis (ITS-Davis). The Institute is staffed by over 150 faculty, staff, and student researchers. He is also Acting Director of the UC Davis Energy Efficiency Center. In February 2007, Governor Schwarzenegger appointed Dr. Sperling to the "automotive engineering" seat on the California Air Resources Board. His appointment was confirmed by the California Senate in January 2008. His chief responsibilities are oversight and design of the state's climate change, alternatives fuels, vehicle travel and land use, and zero emission vehicle programs. He also served as co-director of the California Low Carbon Fuel Standard study, requested in the Governor's January 2007 Executive Order.

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APPENDIX B 199 In 2008 he was appointed chair of the "Future of Mobility" Council of the Davos World Economic Forum. Dr. Sperling has led ITS-Davis to international prominence by building strong partnerships with industry, government, and the environmental community, integrating interdisciplinary research and education programs, and connecting research with public outreach and education. ITS-Davis won the 2006 Robert M. Zweig Public Education Award of the National Hydrogen Association, 2005 TRANNY award for Organization of the Year by the California Transportation Foundation, 1998 Employer of the Year Award of the Women's Transportation Seminar of Sacramento, and was selected as a finalist for the 2003 World Technology Energy Award. Dr. Sperling is recognized as a leading international expert on transportation technology assessment, energy and environmental aspects of transportation, and transportation policy. He has testified ten times to the US Congress and state legislatures, and provided keynote presentations and invited talks in recent years at international conferences in Asia, Europe, and North America. In the past 25 years, he has authored or co-authored over 200 technical papers and 11 books, including Two Billion Cars (Oxford University Press, 2009). He was "lead author" of the transportation chapter in the 2007 IPCC report, "Mitigation of Climate Change," (IPCC won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2008) and a recent member of 13 National Academies committees on Energy Efficiency, Gasoline Taxes, Hydrogen, Transport in China, Biomass Fuels R&D, Sustainable Transportation, and related topics. He was founding chair of standing committees for the U.S. Transportation Research Board on Alternative Transportation Fuels (1989-'96), and Sustainability and Transportation (2006- 08). He is the founding organizer of the premier conference on transportation and energy policy, bringing together every two years since 1988 the leaders from industry, government, academia, and the environmental community. He serves on many advisory committees and advises senior executives of many automotive and energy companies, environmental groups, and national governments, including review committees at three DOE national laboratories. He is widely cited in leading newspapers, has been interviewed many times on NPR radio, including Science Friday, Talk of the Nation, and Fresh Air, and in February 2009 he was featured on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. He received the following awards: 2009 Robert Zweig Public Education Award of the National Hydrogen Association, National Associate member of the National Academies in 2004, 2002 Carl Moyer Memorial Award for Scientific Leadership and Technical Excellence by the Coalition for Clean Air, 1997 "Clean Air Award" by the American Lung Association of Sacramento, 1996 Distinguished Public Service Award by the University of California, Davis, and 1993 Gilbert F. White Fellowship by Resources for the Future (Washington, D.C.). Prior to obtaining his Ph.D. in Transportation Engineering from the

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200 U.S. BATTERY INDUSTRY FOR ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLES University of California, Berkeley (with minors in Economics and Energy & Resources), Professor Sperling worked two years as an environmental planner for the US Environmental Protection Agency and two years as an urban planner in the Peace Corps in Honduras. He has an undergraduate degree in engineering and urban planning from Cornell University. During 1999-2000, he was on leave as a visiting scholar at OECD (European Conference of Ministers of Transport). DEBBIE STABENOW Born and raised in Michigan, United States Senator Debbie Stabenow knows what matters to Michigan. She made history in 2000 when she became the first woman from the State of Michigan elected to the United States Senate. From the County Commission to the State Legislature to the halls of Congress, she is a respected national leader on health care and manufacturing issues and champion for Michigan. She has risen in Senate leadership as Senate Conference Secretary and now Chair of the Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee. A nationally recognized leader, Senator Stabenow is respected for her ability to build coalitions to get things done for Michigan and our nation. Her recent appointment to the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, and membership on the Senate Finance, Agriculture and Budget Committees, has given her a powerful and unique role to play in shaping our nation's health care, manufacturing and energy policies, so critical to our future. Senator Stabenow is fighting for new laws to crack down on countries violating our trade laws and to reduce health care costs. She is a recognized leader in the fight to make prescription drugs more affordable and to bring innovative technology to the health care system. Her proposed Green Collar Jobs Initiative would retool older manufacturing facilities and invest in the newest energy technologies, including advanced batteries, to reduce our dependence on foreign oil and create jobs here at home. She is also delivering for Michigan as a member of the Senate Agriculture Committee. Her leadership in rewriting our nation's farm bill has brought about an historic new focus on Michigan's specialty crops and victories for Michigan in alternative energy production, Great Lakes preservation, land conservation, research, food safety, nutrition, and rural development. Senator Stabenow also wrote a new law to assist families facing foreclosure by eliminating the IRS rule that unfairly taxed homeowners who had a portion of their original mortgage loan forgiven by the bank. She is a strong advocate for higher education working to pass recent increases in college financial aid and securing millions in cutting-edge research dollars for Michigan's colleges and universities. She is a champion for Michigan's Great Lakes and waterways, and author of the Michigan Lighthouse and Maritime Heritage Act to promote tourism and help

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APPENDIX B 201 preserve some of Michigan's greatest historical treasures. She is also the author of the first ever federal ban on drilling for oil and gas in our Great Lakes. As a State Legislator, Stabenow was acclaimed one of Michigan's most passionate advocates for children and an expert in family law and small business issues. Her influence as a State Legislator is evident throughout Michigan law from Michigan's historic property tax cut and small business reforms, to nationally acclaimed legislation to protect children and families. DAVID STIEREN David Stieren is the Manager of Technology Acceleration for the Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Mr. Stieren is responsible for the development and deployment of the processes used by the National MEP System to accelerate the many different ways by which U.S. manufacturers can leverage technology to their competitive advantage. MEP operates 59 Centers and over 440 service locations in all 50 U.S. states and Puerto Rico, providing assistance to approximately 30,000 U.S. manufacturers on an annual basis. Mr. Stieren has extensive knowledge of the operations, systems, and technologies used by a broad array of U.S. manufacturing industries, from defense and aerospace, to automotive, shipbuilding, semiconductor electronics, heavy equipment, fuel cell, and many others. He has significant experience developing and managing strategic and technical partnerships involving U.S. industry, government agencies, and academia. Mr. Stieren has a Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering, a Master's Degree in Technology Management, and he completed the coursework for a Doctorate Degree in Engineering Management. BILL VAN AMBURG Bill Van Amburg is Senior Vice President for WestStart-CALSTART, a non- profit, fuel-neutral and member-supported consortium of more than 145 companies worldwide. It focuses on helping companies and agencies develop and produce clean and efficient vehicles, advanced and renewable fuels and new systems for transit and personal mobility, serving as a strategic broker to the industry. Bill oversees teams in five program areas at the consortium: Heavy hybrids; New Fuels; Technology commercialization; Fleet analysis and consulting; and industry services. Responsibilities include the Hybrid Truck Users Forum (HTUF), a national program to speed the production and commercialization of

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202 U.S. BATTERY INDUSTRY FOR ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLES heavy-duty hybrid trucks, operated in a partnership with the U.S. Army's National Automotive Center (NAC), with support from the Hewlett Foundation and the Department of Energy (DOE). Hybrid trucks and buses reduce fuel use and emissions, saving users money while contributing to reductions in foreign oil importation and global warming emissions. He is also involved with WestStart-CALSTART projects focused on overall greenhouse gas reduction and energy security strategies. Van Amburg brings more than 25 years of experience in marketing and market development, technology commercialization, communications and environmental markets, including emission credit trading. Previously, Van Amburg was senior vice president with the first electronic emission credit exchange, has operated his own environmental marketing consulting practice, The Ardent Group, as well as serving previously as a vice president with WestStart-CALSTART from 1993-2000. Prior to that he had a nearly two decade career as an Emmy award winning broadcast journalist focusing on science, technology and environmental issues. He is a graduate of the Executive Management Program at the UCLA Anderson School of Management and has a certificate in Brand Management from the Stanford Alumni Association, as well as a bachelor's degree in Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley. CHARLES WESSNER Charles Wessner is a National Academy Scholar and Director of the Program on Technology, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship. He is recognized nationally and internationally for his expertise on innovation policy, including public-private partnerships, entrepreneurship, early-stage financing for new firms, and the special needs and benefits of high-technology industry. He testifies to the U.S. Congress and major national commissions, advises agencies of the U.S. government and international organizations, and lectures at major universities in the U. S. and abroad. Reflecting the strong global interest in innovation, he is frequently asked to address issues of shared policy interest with foreign governments, universities, research institutes, and international organizations, often briefing government ministers and senior officials. He has a strong commitment to international cooperation, reflected in his work with a wide variety of countries around the world. Dr. Wessner's work addresses the linkages between science-based economic growth, entrepreneurship, new technology development, university-industry clusters, regional development, small-firm finance and public-private partnerships. His program at the National Academies also addresses policy

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APPENDIX B 203 issues associated with international technology cooperation, investment, and trade in high-technology industries. Currently, he directs a series of studies centered on government measures to encourage entrepreneurship and support the development of new technologies and the cooperation between industry, universities, laboratories, and government to capitalize on a nation's investment in research. Foremost among these is a congressionally mandated study of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, reviewing the operation and achievements of this $2.3 billion award program for small companies and start-ups. He is also directing a major study on best practice in global innovation programs, entitled Comparative Innovation Policy: Best Practice for the 21st Century. Today's meeting on "Clustering for 21st Century Prosperity" forms part of a complementary analysis entitled Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State & Regional Innovation Initiatives. The overarching goal of Dr. Wessner's work is to develop a better understanding of how we can bring new technologies forward to address global challenges in health, climate, energy, water, infrastructure, and security. SONYA ZANARDELLI Sonya Zanardelli is the US Army RDECOM-TARDEC Ground Vehicle Power & Mobility, Energy Storage Team Leader & DOD Power Sources Member. Sonya Zanardelli received her B.S. from Wayne State University and M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from University of Michigan - Dearborn, in 2002 and 2005, respectively. She is currently working at US Army Tank Automotive Research Development Engineering Center (TARDEC) in Warren, MI and holds the position of Energy Storage Team Leader in the Research Business Group under the Ground Vehicle Power & Mobility Directorate and has worked at TARDEC for 9.5 years. Her research fields of interest include bidirectional converters and control and advanced energy storage research for military ground vehicle applications.

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