APPENDIX A

COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

PER PINSTRUP-ANDERSEN (Chair) is the H.E. Babcock Professor of Food, Nutrition and Public Policy, the J. Thomas Clark Professor of Entrepreneurship, and Professor of Applied Economics at Cornell University and Professor of Agricultural Economics at Copenhagen University. He is past Chairman of the Science Council of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) and Past President of the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). He has a B.S. from the Danish Agricultural University, a M.S. and Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University and honorary doctoral degrees from universities in the United States, United Kingdom, Netherlands, Switzerland and India. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the American Agricultural Economics Association. He served 10 years as the International Food Policy Research Institute’s Director General and seven years as department head; seven years as an economist at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, Colombia; and six years as a distinguished professor at Wageningen University. He is the 2001 World Food Prize Laureate and the recipient of several awards for his teaching, research and communication of research results. His research and teaching include economic analyses of food and nutrition policy, globalization and poverty, agricultural development, the interaction between the food system and human health and nutrition, and agricultural research and technology policy.

MIKE BUSHELL is based at Jealott’s Hill International Research Centre in the United Kingdom. Dr. Bushell has recently taken up a new role in global R&D as principal scientific adviser and is also secretary to Syngenta’s Science and Technology Advisory Board. Dr. Bushell graduated with a B.Sc. in organic chemistry from Liverpool and a Ph.D. from Liverpool/University of California at Davis. Dr. Bushell came to Jealott’s Hill in 1980 as a team leader in insecticide research, following postdoctoral work in Cambridge. Since 1990, Dr. Bushell has held various management positions in chemistry and bioscience and has also worked within Zeneca Specialties in Manchester. He returned to Jealott’s Hill in 1999 as sector leader for insect and fungal control. Within Syngenta he has previously been head of R&T projects, head of discovery, head of strategy and technology, head of external partnerships, and head of Jealott’s Hill International Research Centre.

JASON CLAY is Senior Vice-President of Market Transformation in the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). Over the course of his career Jason Clay has worked on a family farm, taught at Harvard and Yale, worked in the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and spent more than twenty-five years working with human rights and environmental organizations. In 1988, Clay invented Rainforest Marketing, one of the first fair-trade ecolabels in the United States, and helped create Rainforest Crunch. From 1999-2003, Clay co-directed a consortium with WWF, World Bank,



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APPENDIX A COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION PER PINSTRUP-ANDERSEN (Chair) is the H.E. Babcock Professor of Food, Nutrition and Public Policy, the J. Thomas Clark Professor of Entrepreneurship, and Professor of Applied Economics at Cornell University and Professor of Agricultural Economics at Copenhagen University. He is past Chairman of the Science Council of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) and Past President of the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). He has a B.S. from the Danish Agricultural University, a M.S. and Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University and honorary doctoral degrees from universities in the United States, United Kingdom, Netherlands, Switzerland and India. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the American Agricultural Economics Association. He served 10 years as the International Food Policy Research Institute’s Director General and seven years as department head; seven years as an economist at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, Colombia; and six years as a distinguished professor at Wageningen University. He is the 2001 World Food Prize Laureate and the recipient of several awards for his teaching, research and communication of research results. His research and teaching include economic analyses of food and nutrition policy, globalization and poverty, agricultural development, the interaction between the food system and human health and nutrition, and agricultural research and technology policy. MIKE BUSHELL is based at Jealott’s Hill International Research Centre in the United Kingdom. Dr. Bushell has recently taken up a new role in global R&D as principal scientific adviser and is also secretary to Syngenta’s Science and Technology Advisory Board. Dr. Bushell graduated with a B.Sc. in organic chemistry from Liverpool and a Ph.D. from Liverpool/University of California at Davis. Dr. Bushell came to Jealott’s Hill in 1980 as a team leader in insecticide research, following postdoctoral work in Cambridge. Since 1990, Dr. Bushell has held various management positions in chemistry and bioscience and has also worked within Zeneca Specialties in Manchester. He returned to Jealott’s Hill in 1999 as sector leader for insect and fungal control. Within Syngenta he has previously been head of R&T projects, head of discovery, head of strategy and technology, head of external partnerships, and head of Jealott’s Hill International Research Centre. JASON CLAY is Senior Vice-President of Market Transformation in the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). Over the course of his career Jason Clay has worked on a family farm, taught at Harvard and Yale, worked in the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and spent more than twenty- five years working with human rights and environmental organizations. In 1988, Clay invented Rainforest Marketing, one of the first fair-trade ecolabels in the United States, and helped create Rainforest Crunch. From 1999-2003, Clay co-directed a consortium with WWF, World Bank, 243

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244 A SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGE: FOOD SECURITY FOR ALL UN Food and Agriculture Organization, and National Aquaculture Centres of Asia/Pacific to identify better management practices for shrimp. He has convened multi-stakeholder roundtables to reduce the impacts of producing salmon, soy, sugarcane, cotton and palm oil. Clay leads WWF’s efforts to work with private sector companies to improve their supply chain management, particularly ingredient sourcing and carbon and water neutrality. Clay is the author of 15 books (most recently, World Aquaculture and the Environment (in press), Exploring the Links between International Business and Poverty Reduction: A Case Study of Unilever in Indonesia (2005) and World Agriculture and the Environment (2004) and more than 250 articles and 500 invited presentations. Clay studied at Harvard and the London School of Economics before receiving his Ph.D. at Cornell University in 1979 in anthropology and international agriculture. BERT DRAKE is a former plant physiologist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Maryland and the leader of two major ecosystem projects on the impacts of rising atmospheric CO2 and climate change. The Chesapeake Bay wetland study is now in the 23rd year making it the longest running experiment of its type ever undertaken. In collaboration with NASA, the CO2 study was expanded in 1996 to include similar studies of a nutrient and water limited dwarf oak forest on Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. These studies have resulted in more than 100 publications and involved collaborators, post doctoral fellows and graduate students from many foreign countries and the US. A popular lecturer, he has been invited to speak on the impact of global warming on terrestrial ecosystems to a wide range of educational and professional organizations. In 2005, he was designated the Distinguished Research Lecturer by the Smithsonian Institution for his long record of research and public outreach. WILLIAM JURY (NAS) is Distinguished Professor of Soil Physics & Soil Physicist, Emeritus at the University of California, Riverside. His principal research interests are: measurement and modeling of organic and inorganic chemical movement and reactions in field soils; development and testing of organic chemical screening models; characterization volatilization losses of organic compounds. At present, Dr. Jury is conducting research in field measurement and modeling of preferential flow of chemicals, chemical transport at low water content, unstable flow of water in soil, global water management, and sequential reuse of agricultural drainage water. He is a Fellow of the Soil Science Society of America, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Geophysical Union. In 1999 he was presented in Washington, DC with the USDA Secretary’s Honor Award for Environmental Protection, and in 2000 was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Recently, he has been identified by the Institute for Scientific Information as among the 100 most highly cited researchers in the world in both the fields of Engineering and Environment/Ecology. Dr. Jury earned his Ph.D. and MS in Physics from the University of Wisconsin and his BS in Physics from the University of Michigan. PHILIP PARDEY is Professor of Science and Technology Policy in the Department of Applied Economics and Director of the International Science and Technology Practice and Policy (InSTePP) center at the University of Minnesota. Previously he was a senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, DC where he led the institute’s Science and Technology Policy Program, and prior to 1994 at the International Service for

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APPENDIX A 245 National Agricultural Research in The Hague, Netherlands. He is a graduate of the University of Adelaide, Australia, and obtained a doctoral degree in agricultural and applied economics from the University of Minnesota. His research deals with the finance and conduct of R&D globally, methods for assessing the economic impacts of research, and the economic and policy (especially intellectual property) aspects of genetic resources and the biosciences. Dr. Pardey is a Fellow of the American Agricultural Economics Association and a Distinguished Fellow of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society. JULES PRETTY is Professor of Environment and Society at the University of Essex, UK and designate Pro-Vice-Chancellor (from August 2010). His 16 books include This Luminous Coast (in press, 2011), The Earth Only Endures (2007), and Agri-Culture (2002). He is a Fellow of the Society of Biology and the Royal Society of Arts, former Deputy-Chair of the government’s Advisory Committee on Releases to the Environment (ACRE), and has served on advisory committees for a number of government departments. He received an OBE in 2006 for services to sustainable agriculture, and an honorary degree from Ohio State University in 2009. His website is at www.julespretty.com. MARIE RUEL is Director of the Poverty, Health, and Nutrition Division, International Food Policy Research Institute, a position she has held since 2004. She has worked for more than 20 years on issues related to policies and programs to alleviate poverty and child malnutrition in developing countries. She has published extensively in nutrition and epidemiology journals on topics such as maternal and child nutrition, agricultural strategies to improve diet quality and micronutrient nutrition with a focus on women's empowerment, urban livelihoods, food security and nutrition; in the past years, she also led a global process to develop universal indicators of child feeding practices with the World Health Organization. She has served on various international expert committees, such as the National Academy of Sciences, the International Zinc in Nutrition Consultative Group, and the Society for International Nutrition Research. Her current research focuses on the evaluation and strengthening of social protection programs and targeted nutrition interventions to foster human capital formation. She also coordinates a Platform on Agriculture and Health Research, a global initiative aimed at promoting and coordinating policy research on the 2-way linkages between agriculture and health to foster synergies between the two sectors and enhance program and policy and program effectiveness in reducing livelihood, food, health and nutrition insecurity. Before joining IFPRI in 1996, she was head of the Nutrition and Health Division of the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama/Pan American Health Organization (INCAP/PAHO) in Guatemala, where she worked for six years. She earned her PhD in international nutrition at Cornell University. EMMY SIMMONS is currently an independent consultant on international development issues, with a focus on food, agriculture, and Africa. She serves on the boards of several organizations engaged in international agriculture and global development more broadly: the Partnership to Cut Hunger and Poverty in Africa, the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA), the Washington chapter of the Society for International Development (SID), and the Africa Center for Health and Human Security at George Washington University. Ms. Simmons co-chairs the Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability at the National Academies of Science and leads a Roundtable working group on Partnerships for Sustainability. She completed a career of nearly 30 years with

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246 A SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGE: FOOD SECURITY FOR ALL the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) in 2005, having served since 2002 as the Assistant Administrator for Economic Growth, Agriculture, and Trade, a Presidentially- appointed, Senate-confirmed position. Prior to joining USAID, she worked in the Ministry of Planning and Economic Affairs in Monrovia, Liberia and taught and conducted research at Ahmadu Bello University in Zaria, Nigeria. She began her international career as a Peace Corps volunteer in the Philippines from 1962-64. She holds an M.S. degree in agricultural economics from Cornell University and a B.A. degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. KOSTAS STAMOULIS is the Chief of Agricultural Sector in Economic Development Service (ESAE) and Agricultural and Development Economics Division (ESA), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Dr. Stamoulis’s major focuses include: the potential of the rural economy for growth and poverty reduction; changes in food systems and commercialization with effects on smallholders, rural development and rural poverty; analysis of trends in rural development analysis and practice; seed markets as a means of promoting the sustainable utilization of crop genetic resources; introducing food security objectives and policies in Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers; and behavioral economics and development policy. His field activities include: introducing food security and agriculture-related objectives and strategies in the Poverty Reduction Strategy Processes in Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania, Bhutan, Laos and Cambodia; and constraints facing small farmers in supply supermarkets in Honduras and El Salvador. Dr. Stamoulis holds a Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from the University of California, Berkeley and MS in Agricultural Economics from the University of Georgia. DENNIS TREACY is Senior Vice President, Corporate Affairs and Chief Sustainability Officer, Smithfield Foods, Inc. As Senior Vice President, Mr. Treacy oversees and directs the company’s sustainability and corporate affairs programs, including corporate communications and government relations. Since his arrival at Smithfield, he has helped enhance Smithfield’s environmental, community and sustainability policies and initiatives to become a meat industry leader in Corporate Social Responsibility programs. Mr. Treacy has more than 30 years of experience in both the public and private sectors, having previously served as: Director, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality; Manager of Government Affairs, Browning-Ferris Industries; Assistant Attorney General of Natural Resources, Office of the Attorney General of Virginia; and Advisor for regulatory and policy issues at the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources and West Virginia Assistant Attorney General, Environmental and Energy Division. Mr. Treacy received his law degree from the Northwestern School of Law at Lewis and Clark College in Portland, Oregon, and his Bachelor’s Degree in Fisheries and Wildlife from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia. Mr. Treacy is a member of the Virginia State Bar and West Virginia State Bar. He serves or has served as a member on dozens of statewide and national boards and commissions. LAURIAN UNNEVEHR is Director of the Food Economics Division, Economic Research Service (ERS), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Laurian has published over 60 journal articles and book chapters on topics in consumer demand and food policy as well as numerous other publications and outreach reports. She is recognized for original contributions in measuring the consumer benefits from agricultural research, the changing structure of U.S. food demand, and the cost-benefit trade-offs in food health regulation. With coauthors, she has received the

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APPENDIX A 247 American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA) awards for Quality of Communication and for Publication of Enduring Quality, recognizing contributions in food policy and food demand. Laurian was inducted as a fellow of AAEA in July 2009. Prior to coming to ERS to lead the Food Economics Division, Laurian was on the faculty of the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) from 1985 to 2008. Laurian received her Ph.D. and M.A. from the Food Research Institute, Stanford University and her B.A. in economics from the University of California at Davis. PAUL VLEK, a Soil Scientist, is Professor and Director of the Department of Ecology and Natural Resources of the Center for Development Research at the University of Bonn, a federally funded multidisciplinary research and teaching institute concerning sustainable development issues. Prior to accepting this post, he was a Professor and Director at the Institute of Agronomy in the Tropics at Georg-August University in Goettingen. Dr. Vlek is Editor-in-Chief of “Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems,” and Editor of “Applied Botany” and “Basic and Applied Ecology.” Dr. Vlek’s research interests include the world’s soil resources, agricultural use of land, and the evidence of ongoing degradation and desertification of the soil in many food- producing regions.

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