SPEAKER BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

JUDE CAPPER is an Assistant Professor of Dairy Sciences in the Department of Animal Sciences at Washington State University. She undertook her undergraduate and graduate degrees at Harper Adams University College (UK) where her post-graduate research focused on the relationship between ruminant nutrition and neonatal behavior. Following a two-year lectureship in Animal Biology at the University of Worcester (UK), her post-doctoral research at Cornell focused on two areas: ruminant lipid metabolism, and modeling the environmental impact of dairy production. At Cornell, Jude worked with Prof. Dale Bauman to develop a deterministic model of the environmental impact of dairy production, based on the NRC (2001) nutrient requirements for dairy cows. At WSU, her program focuses on quantifying the environmental impact of dairy and beef production systems, identifying the factors that contribute to mitigating resource use and greenhouse gas emissions and communicating the results to producers, consumer and policy-makers. Current projects include comparisons of the historical and modern US beef industry; evaluation of the effect of dairy breed on the environmental impact of cheese production; and quantifying the impact of performance-enhancing technologies on resource use and greenhouse gas emissions from beef production.

HARTWIG DE HAEN is retired Professor, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development, University of Göttingen. From 1990 to 2005 he was Assistant Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in Rome. From 1990 to 1994 he was head of FAO’s Agriculture Department and from 1995 until his retirement head of the Economic and Social Department. He has studied at the Universities of Kiel and Göttingen and at Michigan State University/USA. He holds a Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics. During his time in academic institutions he was a member of research and policy advisory bodies, including the Council of Scientific Advisors to the Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (Chair from 1988-1990). He has published books and articles in the fields of production economics, development economics, agricultural policy and environmental economics.

JON FOLEY is the Director of the Institute on the Environment (IonE) at the University of the Minnesota, where he also holds a McKnight Presidential Chair in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior. Dr. Foley’s work focuses on the behavior of complex global environmental systems and their interactions with human societies. In particular, Foley’s research group uses state-of-the-art computer models and satellite measurements to analyze changes in land use, ecosystems, climate and freshwater resources across regional and global scales. Foley joined the University of Minnesota in 2008, after spending 15 years on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin. He has won numerous awards and honors, including the National Science Foundation’s Faculty Early Career Development Award, the Samuel C. Johnson



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SPEAKER BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION JUDE CAPPER is an Assistant Professor of Dairy Sciences in the Department of Animal Sciences at Washington State University. She undertook her undergraduate and graduate degrees at Harper Adams University College (UK) where her post-graduate research focused on the relationship between ruminant nutrition and neonatal behavior. Following a two-year lectureship in Animal Biology at the University of Worcester (UK), her post-doctoral research at Cornell focused on two areas: ruminant lipid metabolism, and modeling the environmental impact of dairy production. At Cornell, Jude worked with Prof. Dale Bauman to develop a deterministic model of the environmental impact of dairy production, based on the NRC (2001) nutrient requirements for dairy cows. At WSU, her program focuses on quantifying the environmental impact of dairy and beef production systems, identifying the factors that contribute to mitigating resource use and greenhouse gas emissions and communicating the results to producers, consumer and policy-makers. Current projects include comparisons of the historical and modern US beef industry; evaluation of the effect of dairy breed on the environmental impact of cheese production; and quantifying the impact of performance-enhancing technologies on resource use and greenhouse gas emissions from beef production. HARTWIG DE HAEN is retired Professor, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development, University of Göttingen. From 1990 to 2005 he was Assistant Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in Rome. From 1990 to 1994 he was head of FAO’s Agriculture Department and from 1995 until his retirement head of the Economic and Social Department. He has studied at the Universities of Kiel and Göttingen and at Michigan State University/USA. He holds a Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics. During his time in academic institutions he was a member of research and policy advisory bodies, including the Council of Scientific Advisors to the Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (Chair from 1988-1990). He has published books and articles in the fields of production economics, development economics, agricultural policy and environmental economics. JON FOLEY is the Director of the Institute on the Environment (IonE) at the University of the Minnesota, where he also holds a McKnight Presidential Chair in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior. Dr. Foley’s work focuses on the behavior of complex global environmental systems and their interactions with human societies. In particular, Foley’s research group uses state-of-the-art computer models and satellite measurements to analyze changes in land use, ecosystems, climate and freshwater resources across regional and global scales. Foley joined the University of Minnesota in 2008, after spending 15 years on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin. He has won numerous awards and honors, including the National Science Foundation’s Faculty Early Career Development Award, the Samuel C. Johnson 79

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80 A SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGE: FOOD SECURITY FOR ALL Distinguished Faculty Fellowship, the J.S. McDonnell Foundation's 21st Century Science Award, and the Sustainability Science Award from the Ecological Society of America. In 1997, President Bill Clinton awarded him the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. He has also been named an Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow. JAMES FOSTER is Professor of Economics and International Affairs at The Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University. Professor Foster received his Ph.D. in economics from Cornell University where he received the Selma Fine Goldsmith Award for his dissertation. He held positions at the Krannert School of Management at Purdue University and Department of Economics at Vanderbilt before joining the Elliott School. He received the Unilever Fellowship (UK) and the Robert Wood Johnson Investigator Award in Health Policy, and holds a Doctorate Honoris Causa, from Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo (Mexico). Professor Foster’s research focuses on welfare economics — using economic tools to evaluate the well-being of people. His joint 1984 Econometrica paper is one of the most cited papers on poverty; it introduced the FGT Index, which has been used in thousands of studies and was the basis for targeting the Progresa/Oportunidades program in Mexico. Other work includes a book project on economic inequality with Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen; a paper on poverty and growth in a recent issue of the International Economic Review with Miguel Szekely, Undersecretary of Education in Mexico; and a paper measuring multidimensional poverty with Sabina Alkire, Director of Oxford’s Poverty and Human Development Initiative. PIETRO GENNARI is the Director of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Statistics Division since the beginning of 2009. He has over 25 years of experience in the main areas of official statistics and in managing statistical programmes, both at the national and international level. He began his professional career in 1986 working in the National Planning Commission for the System of Wholesale Food Markets, and subsequently served for five years as Senior Statistician at the Institute for Studies and Economic Analyses (ISAE), a public research Institute that conducts analyses and forecasts in support of the economic policy decisions of the Italian government. Between 1993 and 2003, he worked for the Italian National Institute of Statistics, first as Head of the Labour Force Survey Division and then in the Directorate for Short-Term Business Statistics. From August 2003 to November 2005, Mr. Gennari was Adviser on Economic Statistics for the UN Regional Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), assisting the National Statistics Offices of the Region in improving basic data sources for the compilation of the main economic indicators. At the end of 2005 he became the Director of ESCAP Statistics Division, where he launched a new programme of statistical capacity building and redesigned the statistical dissemination strategy. STEPHAN KLASEN is professor of development economics and empirical economic research at the University of Göttingen, where he also heads the Ibero-American Institute. Previously he was professor of economics at the University of Munich as well as a fellow at King’s College in Cambridge and an economist at the World Bank in South Africa. His research interests are in population, labor, welfare, and development economics. He holds a BA, MA, and Ph.D. from Harvard University. His current research interests include an assessment of the relation between labor market events and demographic decisions at the household level, an analysis of the

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SPEAKER BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION 81 determinants of undernutrition and child mortality in developing countries, the linkages between inequality, growth, and well-being, and the causes and consequences of gender inequality in developing countries. PETER McCORNICK is the Director of Water Policy at Duke University’s Nicholas Institute. In this capacity he focuses on critical water resources management issues, with on-going activities in North East Africa, South East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, and the US. He has approximately three decades of experience in addressing the challenges in the water resources, agriculture and environment sectors, that has included research, policy development, planning, implementation, teaching and capacity building. Prior to joining Duke in 2008, Dr. McCornick was the Director for Asia for the International Water Management Institute. Previously he was assigned as water resources and irrigation specialist to the water and coastal resources team of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). In addition, he has advised and provided input to a number of other bilateral, multi-lateral and private entities including the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the World Health Organization, the State Department and the United States. He has a PhD and MS in water resources and irrigation engineering from Colorado State University, and a BSc in agricultural engineering from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in the UK. He is a registered Civil Engineer in Colorado, and a member of the American Academy of Water Resources Engineers (AAWRE). LYNNETTE NEUFELD is a technical expert in international nutrition and has 25 years of experience researching diverse nutritional and health-related issues that affect the world’s most vulnerable populations. As Chief Technical Advisor at the Micronutrient Initiative (MI), Dr. Neufeld helps maintain the integrity of the organization’s programs by providing technical support to ensure up-to-date evidence-based design and strong monitoring for program improvement. She also contributes to the generation of new evidence by active maintenance of a research portfolio related to many aspects of nutrition and micronutrients, using diverse methodologies from surveys and other observational methods to randomized controlled trials and rigorous program effectiveness evaluations. Her areas of expertise include: nutritional factors affecting fetal and early childhood growth and development, causes, consequences and strategies to control anaemia and micronutrient malnutrition during pregnancy and early childhood and women’s nutritional status during pregnancy. Dr. Neufeld received her Ph.D. and M.Sc. in International Nutrition from the Cornell University. ADELHEID ONYANGO is a technical officer in the Department of Nutrition for Health and Development at the World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva. Dr. Onyango is a key member of team that developed the WHO child growth standards and associated application tools. Her functions include planning and managerial oversight for global and regional level capacity building for the implementation of growth standards; country-level advocacy for appropriate policies and technical support for integration of the WHO growth assessment tools into national child health programs and the establishment/maintenance of nutrition surveillance systems. Dr. Onyango holds a Master’s degree and Ph.D. in Nutrition, both from McGill University, Canada.

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82 A SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGE: FOOD SECURITY FOR ALL RICHARD PERRIN is the Jim Roberts Professor of Agricultural Economics at University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Dr. Perrin is an agricultural economist who specializes in the economics of ethanol production. His recent work has focused on biofuel economics, including the environmental impacts of corn ethanol, the potential of switchgrass for cellulosic ethanol and the potential for crop residues as energy crops. His recent findings have been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences; Energy Policy; Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining; and BioEnergy Research. He also has studied the relationship between grain ethanol production and food prices, both in the United States and in food-insecure areas of the world. He has a long history of examining agricultural productivity issues in the developing world. Before joining the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 1993, Perrin was a faculty member at North Carolina State University and Iowa State University and was an economist for the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) in Mexico. He has a doctorate in agricultural economics and a bachelor’s degree in agricultural business from Iowa State University. STEPHEN POLASKY (NAS) is a Fesler Lampert Professor of Ecological/Environmental Economics and an interdisciplinary chair in the Departments of Applied Economics and Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, University of Minnesota. He joined the University of Minnesota in 1999 after serving professor positions at Boston College and Oregon State University. Dr. Polasky’s research interests include ecosystem services; natural capital; biodiversity conservation; endangered species policy; integrating ecological and economic analysis; renewable energy; environmental regulation; and common property resources. As an Institute on the Environment resident fellow, he is working to expand current integrated models showing the impact of land use on ecosystem services. In addition, he seeks to engage public and private sector groups to improve land use planning. He holds a Ph.D. from University of Michigan. MARTIN RAVALLION is Director of the Development Research Group of the World Bank. He has held various positions in the Bank, since he joined as an Economist in 1988. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from the London School of Economics, and has taught economics at L.S.E., Oxford University, the Australian National University, and Princeton University. His main research interests over the past 25 years have concerned poverty and policies for fighting it. He has advised numerous governments and international agencies on this topic, and he has written extensively on this and other subjects in economics, including three books and over 180 papers in scholarly journals and edited volumes. He currently serves on the Editorial Boards of ten economics journals, is a Senior Fellow of the Bureau for Research in Economic Analysis of Development and a Founding Council Member of the Society for the Study of Economic Inequality. BENJAMIN SENAUER is a Professor in the Department of Applied Economics at the University of Minnesota. He served as Director of the Center for International Food and Agricultural Policy at the University from 1993-1999 and served as Co-Director of The Food Industry Center from 2001-2007. He received his Ph.D. in 1974 from Stanford University. During 1984-1985 and again in 1999-2000, he was a visiting research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute. He was a visiting scholar at Cambridge University in Spring

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SPEAKER BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION 83 1990, at the World Health Organization in Spring 1998, and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in 2004. His primary areas of expertise are consumer behavior, food marketing, household economics, and food and nutrition policy. He has taught courses in consumption economics, food marketing, microeconomic theory, world food problems, and agricultural development. He has co-authored two influential books: Food Trends and the Changing Consumer and Ending Hunger in Our Lifetime: Food Security and Globalization, which received the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association (AAEA) Quality of Communication Award. SHAHLA SHAPOURI is senior economist at the Economic Research Service (ERS), U.S. Department of Agriculture. Shahla started working in the ERS in 1979 and has Ph.D. in agricultural economics from Washington State University and M.S. from Cornell University. She leads research on issues related to factors affecting food market of low-income food-deficit countries, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. Current work includes coordination of ERS research on food security and research on agricultural policy issues relevant to low-income developing countries. She coordinates the Agency’s annual publication of Food Security Assessment report that is mandated by the U.S. Congress and has been distributed widely. She has numerous awards including Service Award for drafting the U.S. position paper for the World Food Summit. Shahla has authored and coauthored numerous technical reports, research monographs, book chapters, and popular reports. Most of her international experience is in Africa and more recently in Central America. JENNIFER SHAW is Head of Sustainability in North America for Syngenta where she leads initiatives to align Syngenta businesses with emerging trends in sustainability. Prior to this, Jennifer led teams and programs for Syngenta and its legacy companies in various areas including Pesticide Regulatory Policy & Issues Management, Environmental Stewardship, Sustainable Agriculture and Ecological Risk Assessment. Jennifer has had several leadership and expert roles in industry and government multi-stakeholder initiatives focused on major environmental challenges for U.S. agriculture. She began her career with ICI Plant Protection in the U.K. as an ecologist, then went on to manage agro-ecosystem field programs in the U.S. and established an Aquatic Ecosystem research facility for collaborative research between industry and academia. Jennifer was educated in Scotland and has a B.Sc. with 1st Class Honors in Agricultural Zoology from the University of Glasgow. She also has a Ph.D. in Ecology and Epidemiology from the University of Aberdeen and the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology. GREG THOMA is has been on the faculty at the University of Arkansas since receiving his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Louisiana State University, and is a Registered Professional Engineer in the state of Arkansas. He has held the Ray C. Adam Chair in Chemical Engineering and is currently the Bates Teaching Professor in Chemical Engineering. He has served as the Quality Assurance Officer for the Integrated Petroleum Environmental Consortium, and as a Director for the Environmental Division of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. His research, including 33 journal publications, focuses on the application of chemical engineering

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84 A SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGE: FOOD SECURITY FOR ALL principles to find solutions to environmental problems. Dr. Thoma is currently lead investigator for a number of life cycle initiatives in the food and agriculture sector including studies on fluid milk, cheese, milk delivery systems, and swine. RICARDO UAUY is a professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and at the University of Chile, and has directed the Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), as well as INTA’s training programs, Clinical Research Center, Division of Human Nutrition and Medical Sciences, and UN University activities. He served as president of the Chilean Nutrition Society and the International Union of Nutritional Sciences council; as expert on many WHO/FAO nutrition committees; as chairman of the UN Administrative Committee on Coordination and Subcommittee on Nutrition Advisory Group; and a member of the NIH (USA) Nutrition Study Section and the Novartis Foundation Scientific Advisory. Ricardo has contributed to over 280 scientific publications, has co-edited three books, and is on the editorial boards of four journals. He received the American Society for Nutritional Sciences McCollum award and is a member of the Chilean Academy of Medicine. He received his M.D. from the University of Chile, completed residency training in Pediatrics at Harvard University and a Neonatology fellowship at Yale University. He obtained his doctoral degree in Nutritional Biochemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. PAUL VLEK (Committee Member), a Soil Scientist, is Professor and Director of the Department of Ecology and Natural Resources of the Center for Development Research at the University of Bonn, a federally funded multidisciplinary research and teaching institute concerning sustainable development issues. Prior to accepting this post, he was a Professor and Director at the Institute of Agronomy in the Tropics at Georg-August University in Goettingen. Dr. Vlek is Editor-in-Chief of “Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems,” and Editor of “Applied Botany” and “Basic and Applied Ecology.” Dr. Vlek’s research interests include the world’s soil resources, agricultural use of land, and the evidence of ongoing degradation and desertification of the soil in many food-producing regions. DIRK VOESTE is Head of Sustainability and Product Stewardship for Crop Protection at BASF SE, Limburgerhof. In this position he is heading also the eco-efficiency analysis in agricultural processes as well as the development of new indicators for this application. He graduated with a Ph.D. in biotechnology and agricultural botany from University Bonn in Germany and a M.Phil. in Post Harvest Technology from the Cranfield Institute of Technology in England. After his studies he was the responsible scientist for the development of a closed equilibrated aquatic ecosystem in cooperation with NASA, USA. Since 1998 he has held various positions in the field of biotechnology, breeding and crop protection. At BASF SE Dirk Voeste previously had responsibilities in research as well as marketing functions. Among others he led the global Plant Health and Seed Treatment Research and was Head of the BASF SeedSolutions Business Development.

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SPEAKER BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION 85 STANLEY WOOD is a senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Washington, DC. He joined IFPRI in 1995 and until 1997 was outposted to the Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT) in Cali, Colombia working on impact assessment studies for regional agricultural research. Since then he has been based at IFPRI headquarters, where he led IFPRI’s research on spatial analysis in a policy context. Wood is a co-principal investigator, HarvestChoice. HarvestChoice is a project funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation that generates knowledge products to help guide strategic investments in improving the productivity and profitability of cropping systems in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Before joining IFPRI, Wood served as an independent consultant to multilateral and bilateral development organizations on natural resource, land use and agricultural systems modeling, based in Libya, Italy and Indonesia. Wood earned his M.Sc. in water resources development from the University of Birmingham, and his M.Sc. in agricultural development from the University of London. Wood received his Ph.D. in Economics, also with the University of London.

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