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Speaker Biographies

Bengt Arnetz, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., M.Sc.Epi., got involved in stress and performance research thanks to his being awarded an Epilepsy Foundation of American Medical Student Summer Internship. He spent his summer with world-renowned stress researchers Professor John W. Mason and Dr. James Meyerhoff at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, DC. This experience motivated Dr. Arnetz to contact Professor Lennart Levi, one of the foremost stress researchers in the world at the time and director of the Karolinska Institute Stress Research Laboratory. Dr. Arnetz finished his medical school studies at Karolinska Institute at the same time he was working on his Ph.D. in psychophysiology. His thesis was the first that demonstrated the adverse psychophysiological effects of social and mental understimulation. Following his M.D. and Ph.D., he completed his residency in occupational and environmental medicine, as well as his M.S. in epidemiology and M.P.H. at the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. He subsequently was recruited to be the department chair in occupational and environmental medicine at the Karolinska Institute/Huddinge University Academic Hospital, followed by being appointed professor of health care environment and health at the National Institute of Psychosocial Factors and Health. He was appointed chair of social medicine at Uppsala University, Sweden, in 1998. In 2005, he was recruited to become professor and director of the occupational and environmental health division at Wayne State University, Detroit. Since joining Wayne, Dr. Arnetz has expanded his studies into individual and organizational determinants of stress resiliency and sustained performance in first responders and knowledge workers. His studies



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C Speaker Biographies Bengt Arnetz, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., M.Sc.Epi., got involved in stress and performance research thanks to his being awarded an Epilepsy Foundation of American Medical Student Summer Internship. He spent his summer with world-renowned stress researchers Professor John W. Mason and Dr. James Meyerhoff at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, DC. This experience motivated Dr. Arnetz to contact Professor Lennart Levi, one of the foremost stress researchers in the world at the time and director of the Karolinska Institute Stress Research Laboratory. Dr. Arnetz finished his medical school studies at Karolinska Institute at the same time he was working on his Ph.D. in psychophysiology. His thesis was the first that demonstrated the adverse psychophysiological effects of social and mental understimulation. Following his M.D. and Ph.D., he completed his residency in occupational and environmental medicine, as well as his M.S. in epidemiology and M.P.H. at the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. He subsequently was recruited to be the department chair in occupational and environmental medicine at the Karolinska Institute/Huddinge University Academic Hospital, followed by being appointed professor of health care environment and health at the National Institute of Psychosocial Factors and Health. He was appointed chair of social medicine at Uppsala University, Sweden, in 1998. In 2005, he was recruited to become professor and director of the occupational and environmental health division at Wayne State University, Detroit. Since joining Wayne, Dr. Arnetz has expanded his studies into individual and organizational determinants of stress resiliency and sustained performance in first responders and knowledge workers. His studies 211

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212 BUILDING A RESILIENT WORKFORCE involve Iraqi civilians and soldiers, European first responders, and police officers in the city of Detroit. Mark Bates, Ph.D., is the director of the Resilience and Prevention Directorate at DCoE. He is a retired U.S. Air Force lieutenant colonel, clinical psychologist, and former pilot. Prior to joining DCoE, Dr. Bates was assigned as the clinical psychology residency training director at Malcolm Grow Medical Center at Andrews Air Force Base, where he developed a model of community-based psychology with supporting training competencies and metrics. His first assignment after residency was as the mental health flight commander at Hanscom, Massachusetts, which offered excellent opportunities to collaborate with other Uni- formed Services components and Veterans Affairs facilities across New England and New York. Dr. Bates was an airlift pilot for his first 9 years on active duty and his flying experiences included combat support missions during Desert Storm and humanitarian missions in the Philippines and Turkey. During this post he completed a master’s degree in counseling psychology at the University of La Verne extension in Alaska, writing his master’s thesis on stress and performance in aviation. Dr. Bates received his Ph.D. from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and completed a residency in clinical psychology at Malcolm Grow Medical Center. He is a 1988 graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy. Randal Beaton, Ph.D., is research professor emeritus on the faculty of the Schools of Nursing and Public Health at the University of Washington, Seattle. Dr. Beaton has led a two-decade program of research focused on the causes and effects of traumatic and occupational stress in firefighters and paramedics. He has also developed and evaluated the benefits of resiliency training and organizational interventions designed to prevent or deter the harmful effects of stress for fire departments in Puget Sound, Washington, with funding from NIOSH and FEMA. Dr. Beaton has also developed, implemented, and evaluated resiliency training programs for state and local public health disaster personnel, emergency dispatchers, and volunteer rescue worker organizations such as the Medical Reserve Corps. More recently Dr. Beaton’s research efforts have focused on the psychosocial parameters of disasters, disaster behavioral health, and disaster preparedness. Dr. Beaton currently serves as the co-director of the Disaster Emergency Preparedness and Response Graduate Certificate Program at the University of Washington, where he also teaches

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213 APPENDIX C graduate-level courses in emergency preparedness and response for health professionals. Dr. Beaton has served as a consultant to the CDC, the Associated Schools of Public Health, the Washington State Department of Health, the National Transportation Safety Board, and the International Association of Fire Fighters. Dr. Beaton also participated in TopOff 4 as an HSEEP exercise evaluator. Dr. Beaton has published his research findings widely and currently serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Stress Management and as an associate editor for the International Journal of Traumatology. Dr. Beaton is a licensed clinical psychologist and a volunteer emergency medical technician. Col. Paul Bliese, Ph.D., began his professional career as a behavioral science researcher for the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics in 1991. In 1992, he received a direct commission into the U.S. Army as a Medical Service Corps officer. During his first assignment at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), Col. Bliese was the primary analyst for the Human Dimensions Research Team in Operation Uphold Democracy in Haiti. In 1999, he was appointed chief, Department of Operational Stress Research, at WRAIR. In this capacity, he led a series of studies on stress and performance and worked to advance statistical methods for analyzing complex applied data. From 2003 to 2007, Col. Bliese commanded the U.S. Army Medical Research Unit–Europe (USAMRU-E). During that time, USAMRU-E conducted research that was instrumental in the military’s decision to implement the Post- Deployment Mental Health ReAssessment (PHDRA) program. While at USAMRU-E he also served as the lead analyst for the third Mental Health Advisory Team to Iraq (MHAT III). Since 2007, he has been the Army’s lead for MHATs. In this capacity he has overseen MHAT V (OIF and OEF) and MHAT VI (OIF and OEF), and has led teams into Iraq for both MHAT V in 2007 and MHAT VI in 2009. In 2010, he led the first Joint MHAT into Afghanistan. Col. Bliese has more than 70 peer-reviewed publications and is an associate editor for the Journal of Applied Psychology. He is currently serving as the director for the Center for Military Psychiatry and Neuroscience at WRAIR. Kathryn Brinsfield, M.D., M.P.H., is director of the Workforce Health and Medical Support Division and deputy chief medical officer (acting) within the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS’s) Office of Health Affairs. She began her service with DHS in July 2008. Prior to joining

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214 BUILDING A RESILIENT WORKFORCE DHS, Dr. Brinsfield worked for various organizations including Massachusetts Homeland Security, Boston Emergency Services, Boston Metropolitan Medical Response System, and the del Valle Emergency Preparedness Training Institute. Dr. Brinsfield left Boston as an associate professor at the Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health with 13 years of experience as an attending physician at Boston City Hospital/Boston Medical Center. She graduated with honors from Brown University and received her medical degree from Tufts School of Medicine and her master’s in public health from Boston University. She completed her residency in emergency medicine at Cook County Hospital in Chicago and her EMS fellowship at Boston EMS. She held medical director positions in various organizations, including associate medical director for Boston Emergency Services and director in Research, Training, and Quality Improvement for Boston Homeland Security. She chaired the American College of Emergency Physician’s Disaster Committee, co-chaired the Massachusetts State Surge Committee, assisted in the creation of the Massachusetts Alternate Standards of Care Committee, and was the commander of the Massachusetts-1 Disaster Medical Assistance Team and a supervisory medical officer for the International Medical and Surgical Response Team, which responded to the September 11 attacks. Vicki Brooks is the Deputy Chief Human Capital Officer (CHCO) at the Department of Homeland Security. Ms. Brooks began her federal career in 1981 with the Department of Health and Human Services and has served as a career civil servant for the past 30 years. Ms. Brooks spent the majority of her federal career with the Department of Defense. As the deputy director for human resources at the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), Ms. Brooks led the successful implementation of programs with far-reaching and enduring impact across the agency. She oversaw the implementation of the National Security Personnel System; the knowledge transfer and training of the first enterprise-wide business- system modernization and customer-relationship management transfor- mation initiatives; and the establishment of the DLA Accountability Of- fice (formerly the Office of Investigations and Internal Audits). Ms. Brooks also served in human resources management and executive lead- ership positions at the Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Defense Information Systems Agency, Department of Commerce and the Trans- portation Security Administration. Prior to her selection as the depart- ment’s deputy CHCO, she was the deputy assistant secretary for human

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215 APPENDIX C resources management at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Ms. Brooks completed 3 years of undergraduate work at Miami University (Oxford, Ohio) and graduated with a B.A. in education from Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio. In 1999, she completed the Federal Ex- ecutive Institute’s Leadership for a Democratic Society program. Ms. Brooks’ work in public service has earned her the DLA Deputy Director Coin, the DLA Director Coin, a Superior Civilian Service Award and Exceptional Civilian Service Award. Sean J. Byrne was named Assistant Administrator for Human Capital in December 2010. He joins the TSA after a distinguished, 36-year career in the U.S. Army. A major general, he most recently served as Commanding General of the Army Human Resources Command (HRC) at Fort Knox, Kentucky, where he was responsible for Army-wide human capital programs. Mr. Byrne’s military service includes five command postings at both international and national locations, and staff assignments at the Pentagon and the White House, where he served as the Vice President’s military assistant, and later as the President’s military aide. In 2003, as the commanding general of the 3rd PERSCOM, his command was part of the initial force going into Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom. In 2005, under the Base Realignment and Closure program, Congress directed the Army to consolidate and move the HRC’s three major operational elements to Fort Knox. Mr. Byrne led the HRC’s reorganization, transformation, and movement. The HRC is responsible for providing a full range of human capital support to a population of nearly 1.2 million active duty, reserve, and National Guard service members and retirees. Mr. Byrne has led workforces ranging in size from 100 to nearly 5,000, and in support of populations ranging from 4,000 to more than 1.2 million soldiers and civil servants. He is known for his collaboration skills, in-depth experience in managing outsourced human resources services, hiring a large volume of personnel annually, and building and enhancing development programs and career paths. After graduating from the ROTC program at the University of Detroit, he received his B.S. and was commissioned as a second lieutenant. He is a graduate of the U.S. Marine Corps Command and Staff College, where he was designated a Distinguished Graduate. He also attended the U.S. Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, and was awarded an M.B.A. from the University of Utah.

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216 BUILDING A RESILIENT WORKFORCE Col. Carl Castro, Ph.D., was most recently appointed director of mili- tary operations, Medicine Research Program, Headquarters, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, Maryland. He formerly served as the chief of military psychiatry at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, and was the commander of the U.S. Army Medical Research Unit–Europe in Heidelberg, Germany. In addition to serving in multiple deployments to Bosnia, he has been chief and program manager of several different medical research programs. Col. Castro is the author of over 50 scientific publications, including a major study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study, which involved 6,200 soldiers and Marines and was conducted by a team at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, is the first attempt to understand the psychological effects of a U.S. war while it is ongoing. He is a graduate of Wichita State University and holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Colorado. Sheila Clark currently serves as the Chief Component Human Capital Officer (CCHCO) for FEMA. As the CCHCO, she is responsible for strategically aligning the agency’s workforce to its mission through effective management of human capital policies and programs, as well as providing day-to-day oversight and assistance on the selection, development, performance management, and recognition of the men and women who serve in our nation’s emergency management agency. During her 26 years with the federal government, she has had the opportunity to develop and apply executive leadership skills across a wide spectrum of organizations and assignments. Her experiences in leadership positions affirm her commitment to public service wherein she has demonstrated the ability to strategize, develop, and execute unique human resource programs at the department, headquarters, and field office levels. She holds a B.S. in human resource management from the University of Maryland and has continued her education completing a human resources certificate program. George S. Everly, Jr., Ph.D., ABPP, is associate professor of psychiatry (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine), professor of psychology (Loyola University), and executive director of Resiliency Science Institutes at UMBC Training Centers, and is the International Critical Incident Stress Foundation (ICISF) NGO representative to the United Nations. Dr. Everly is an award-winning author and researcher. The author of more than 150 papers and 15 texts, including Health Promotion at the

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217 APPENDIX C Workplace (1985), The Nature and Treatment of the Human Stress Response (2002), Resilient Leadership (2010), and Fostering Human Resilience in Crisis (2011), Dr. Everly’s book The Resilient Child (2009) won the Gold Medal as ForeWord Magazine’s Book of the Year. After completing a fellowship at Harvard University, Dr. Everly served as senior research advisor to His Highness The Amir of Kuwait in the wake of the Gulf War. After the attacks of September 11, 2001, he served as a consultant to the Port Authority Police of New York and New Jersey, as well as the New York City Police Department. He was formerly a member of the CDC Mental Health Collaboration Committee (having chaired the mental health competency development subcommittee) and the Infrastructure Expert Team within DHS, and currently he is an advisor to the Hospital Authority of Hong Kong, as well as the U.S. Federal Air Marshals. Brian Flynn, Ed.D., is a consultant, writer, trainer, and speaker specializing in preparation for, response to, and recovery from, the psychosocial aspects of large-scale emergencies and disasters. He has served as an advisor to many federal departments and agencies, states, and national professional organizations. Dr. Flynn is recognized internationally for his expertise in large-scale trauma and has served as an advisor to practitioners, academicians, and government officials in many nations. Dr. Flynn currently serves as an associate director of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, adjunct professor of psychiatry, department of psychiatry, Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, in Bethesda, Maryland. He is retired from federal service where he served as a rear admiral/assistant surgeon general in the U.S. Public Health Service. He has directly operated and supervised the operation of the federal government’s domestic disaster mental health program (including terrorism). Alexander Garza, M.D., M.P.H., is the Assistant Secretary for Health Affairs and chief medical officer of the Department of Homeland Security. He manages the department’s medical and health security matters; oversees the health aspects of contingency planning for all chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear hazards; and leads a coordinated effort to ensure that the department is prepared to respond to biological and chemical weapons of mass destruction. Prior to joining the department in August 2009, Dr. Garza spent 13 years as a practicing physician and medical educator. He most recently served as the director

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218 BUILDING A RESILIENT WORKFORCE of Military Programs at the ER One Institute at the Washington Hospital Center, and has served as the associate medical director of the emergency medical services (EMS) for the state of New Mexico, and director of EMS for the Kansas City, Missouri, Health Department. While practicing medicine he also served as a professor at leading medical institutions including Georgetown University, the University of New Mexico, and the University of Missouri–Kansas City. Dr. Garza served in the U.S. Army Reserve and was a battalion surgeon and public health team chief during Operation Flintlock in Dakar, Senegal. He also served as a public health team chief during Operation Iraqi Freedom and as a special investigator and medical expert for Major General Raymond Odierno. He coordinated the development of a website that facilitated the donation of more than 1 million medical books to Iraq. Dr. Garza earned over a dozen awards including the Bronze Star and Combat Action Badge. Dr. Garza holds an M.D. from the University of Missouri, Columbia School of Medicine, an M.P.H. from the Saint Louis University School of Public Health, and a B.S. in biology from the University of Missouri–Kansas City. Prior to earning his M.D., he served as a paramedic and an emergency medical technician. He is a fellow in the American College of Emergency Physicians and a member of the American Public Health Association and other health organizations. He is a senior editor for the Oxford Handbook in Disaster Medicine and has authored numerous chapters in medical texts and published multiple articles and peer- reviewed publications. He has lectured nationally and internationally about emergency care and disaster medicine. He is a recipient of the American Heart Association’s Young Investigator Award and a White House Commendation for Drug Demand Reduction, and he has received numerous awards for his work in emergency medicine. Alisa Green, M.S., develops policy, guidance, and programs related to employee assistance programs, employee work/life, and resilience for the Department of Homeland Security. Prior to joining DHS, Ms. Green was a Work/Life Program Specialist in the Strategic Human Resources Policy Division of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, and before that, she spent several years managing the Work/Life Center at the National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Before joining the federal government, Ms. Green worked in an academic setting coordinating admissions, internships, and professional development for graduate students, and she also worked as an information specialist for a community-based substance abuse prevention

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219 APPENDIX C program. Ms. Green holds a bachelor’s degree in Comparative Area Studies and French from Duke University, and a master’s degree in Health/Fitness Management from American University. Additionally, she has earned the Work/Life Certificate from Boston College and is a Work-Life Certified Professional. Keith Hill was appointed assistant director of the United States Secret Service, Office of Human Resources and Training, in October 2010. With the responsibility of overseeing both human resources and training for the Secret Service, Mr. Hill coordinates and implements all policies and programs associated with the recruitment, development, retention, strategic planning, and training of its workforce. In this role he supports the agency’s dual mission of protection and investigations. With over 25 years of government service and as a member of the Senior Executive Service, Mr. Hill has served in numerous positions within the investiga- tive, intelligence, and protection arenas. Having managed in both field and headquarter divisions, he most recently served as the deputy assistant director over training and development, recruitment, and the security clearance division for the agency. Joseph J. Hurrell, Ph.D., is the current editor of the American Psychological Association’s Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, an adjunct professor of psychology at St. Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and an affiliate of the Canadian National Center for Occupational Health and Safety. Dr. Hurrell holds bachelor’s and doctor of philosophy degrees in psychology from Miami University and a master’s degree in clinical psychology from Xavier University. He was affiliated with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for many years and was a pioneer in the study of psychosocial factors in occupational health. Dr. Hurrell has authored more than 100 scientific publications on the topic of job stress and health and has edited 8 books on this topic. He is a co-founder of the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology and a founding member of the Society for Occupational Health psychology. He has been internationally recognized for his work and is the recipient of numerous awards. Lieutenant Colonel Daniel T. Johnston, M.D., M.P.H., is board certified by the American Board of Preventive Medicine with a specialty in aerospace medicine and currently serves as medical director for the U.S. Army Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program at the Pentagon. Lt.

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220 BUILDING A RESILIENT WORKFORCE Col. Johnston is certified as a Master Resiliency Trainer through the University of Pennsylvania/U.S. Army Resiliency Training program. He also worked at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute where he was the lead instructor for the medical effects of ionizing radiation course. He currently sits on the Department of Defense Nutritional Supplement Committee and is an adjunct assistant professor at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Lt. Col. Johnston helped to build the first Army Resiliency Center in combat during his time as the Brigade Surgeon for the 1st Combat Aviation Brigade during his deployment to Iraq from March 2010 to March 2011 in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn. During his time in Iraq, Lt. Col. Johnston also conducted a clinical trial examining the role of omega-3 (EPA/DHA) in cognitive performance and mood resilience and the use of biofeedback in a combat setting. Ellen Ernst Kossek, Ph.D., is University Distinguished Professor at Michigan State University’s School of Human Resources & Labor Relations. Dr. Kossek is associate director of the Center for Work, Family Health, and Stress of the National Institutes of Health Work, Family, and Health Network. A popular keynote speaker both in the United States and internationally, Dr. Kossek has trained, conducted research, and consulted on workplace issues related to the changing workplace and organizational effectiveness with managers and organizations. She was elected to the Board of Governors of the National Academy of Management, is division chair of Gender and Diversity in Organizations, and is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology. Her research involves managing organizational change on workplace flexibility, work and family/nonwork and employment relationships, and work processes; international human resources management: workplace inclusion; and gender and diversity. She has won awards for her research on advancing understanding of gender and diversity in organizations. She has received major funding from foundations, governments, and employers. She has authored or edited nine books, including CEO of Me: Creating a Life That Works in the Flexible Job Age, on work-life patterns, which has been recently translated into Korean. Recently she has published a work- life flexibility assessment for training employees and managers on how to manage work-life boundaries and implement flexible working with the Center for Creative Leadership.

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221 APPENDIX C Mary Kruger joined the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in 2008 and serves as chief of staff for the Office of Operations Coordination and Planning (OPS). The mission of OPS is to integrate information concerning the operations, activities, and requirements of all DHS components with other federal, state, local, tribal, private-sector, and international partners to facilitate a coordinated and efficient effort to secure the homeland against all threats and hazards. Through the National Operations Center, OPS serves as the national hub for incident management and sharing homeland security information. OPS includes representatives from all DHS operational components, including Customs and Border Protection, Secret Service, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Coast Guard, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Transportation Security Administration, and Citizenship and Immigration Services. Ms. Kruger has been in the Senior Executive Service for 12 years, and in prior assignments she served as policy director in the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’s) Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. She was responsible for implementation of public health and preparedness legislation dealing with medical countermeasures, the National Disaster Medical System, and the Strategic National Stockpile. She led the implementation of various Homeland Security Presidential Directives regarding public health preparedness, chemical defense, pandemic flu, and disaster response. She served as liaison to the White House Homeland Security Council on numerous issues related to biodefense. Prior to joining HHS, Ms. Kruger served as the first director of the Office of Homeland Security for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). She focused primarily on water security, decontamination, emergency response, and research and development; and she served three EPA administrators in this leadership role. In her many years with EPA, Ms. Kruger also served as deputy director of the Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, where she led the agency’s radiological emergency response teams, development and implementation of defense-related waste disposal regulations and programs, and voluntary indoor air health efforts. Before joining the federal government, she was a consultant to NASA, the Department of Defense, and the Department of Energy, as well as state health and environmental programs. She has more than 25 years of professional experience and holds a master’s degree in public policy from the University of Maryland and a bachelor’s degree in animal science and biology from Virginia Tech.

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222 BUILDING A RESILIENT WORKFORCE Kimberly Lew is chief of the Personnel Security Division (PSD) for the Department of Homeland Security in the Office of the Chief Security Officer. She is responsible for the formulation and promulgation of personnel security and suitability policies and procedures DHS-wide. She represents DHS and serves on many interagency committees such as the Security Executive Agent Advisory Committee affecting federal personnel security policies and chairs the DHS Personnel Security Working Group. As chief, Ms. Lew leads a staff of more than 75 employees and plans, directs, and coordinates the personnel security operations for DHS Headquarters. The HQ PSD is responsible for the background investigation process. This includes the preappointment and final adjudicative determinations of more than 10,000 cases yearly as well as granting security clearances to employees and state and local partners. Ms. Lew’s organization is also responsible for all aspects of the personnel security program such as the coordination of the security appeals process, polygraphs, and customer service. Ms. Lew has more than 18 years of federal service and 15 years in the personnel security field. Ms. Lew previously held positions at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the Office of Personnel Management, the Drug Enforcement Administration, and the Department of Navy. Kevin Livingston has been the deputy assistant director of the Washington Operations since February 2009. Prior to this assignment he served as the chief of the Physical Techniques Division at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) since June 2004. In September 2003, Mr. Livingston was selected as the chief of the Counterterrorism Division. Mr. Livingston also served as the assistant chief (February 2001) and as a detailed lead instructor (August 1998) in the Counterterrorism Division. Prior to joining the FLETC, Mr. Livingston spent more than 15 years as a federal police officer with the U.S. Secret Service (USSS), Uniformed Division. The FLETC trains the majority of federal officers and agents. It services more than 80 federal agencies; provides training to state, local, and international police in selected advanced programs; graduates approximately 50,000 students annually; and is the largest law enforcement training operation in the country. Headquartered on approximately 1,600 acres at Glynco, near Brunswick, Georgia, the FLETC also operates facilities in Artesia, New Mexico; Charleston, South Carolina; and Cheltenham, Maryland. The FLETC also has oversight responsibilities on behalf of DHS for the International Law Enforcement Academies at Gaborone, Botswana, and

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223 APPENDIX C San Salvador, El Salvador. Mr. Livingston’s assignment with the USSS included the Office of Protective Operations from 1985 until 2001. As a police officer, Mr. Livingston performed duties in various assignments, including the uniformed patrol at the Foreign Missions in Washington, DC, and protective assignments at the White House and around the world. He was also assigned as a supervisor with the Counter Sniper Support Team responsible for the protection of the President and Vice President of the United States and their immediate families. Mr. Livingston served in the Marine Corps from 1982 to 1985. He was assigned as a Marine security guard at the Marine barracks in Washington, DC, and Camp David, the presidential retreat, in Thurmont, Maryland. Stephanie Lombardo joined the Office of the Chief Human Capital Of- ficer Leader Development in January 2011 as program manager for the new DHS Senior Executive Service Candidate Development Program (SES CDP). In this role, Ms. Lombardo is responsible for leading the department’s effort to implement and manage a single SES CDP for all components and headquarters organizations. Prior to joining the Depart- ment of Homeland Security, Ms. Lombardo spent nearly 8 years with the Department of Veterans Affairs, first as an education specialist with the Veterans Health Administration and then as the education and training officer for the VA’s National Cemetery Administration, where she was responsible for all staff development and training for 133 national ceme- teries across the United States and in Puerto Rico. Before becoming a leader in the federal government, Ms. Lombardo was employed as a staff development specialist by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ms. Lombardo has B.A. in English and French from Willamette University and an M.A. in comparative literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Elizabeth Merrick, Ph.D., is senior scientist at the Institute for Behavioral Health at Brandeis University’s Heller School for Social Policy and Management. She is trained as a clinical social worker and has a Ph.D. in health policy. Dr. Merrick has conducted research on behavioral health services for the past 15 years with a focus on workplace programs, including EAPs. Her research has investigated access to care, utilization patterns, quality of care, and stakeholder perspectives. For the past 6 years she has led a study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse through the Brandeis/Harvard Research

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224 BUILDING A RESILIENT WORKFORCE Center that examined substance abuse treatment access and the role of EAPs. Ann Mirabito, Ph.D., is assistant professor of marketing at Baylor University. Her health and wellness research focuses on ways stakeholders can act to improve outcomes and value. Her other research examines how consumers make complex decisions related to value (quality evaluations, price fairness, and risk perception). Her work has appeared in Harvard Business Review, MIT Sloan Management Review, and medical journals, including Annals of Internal Medicine and Mayo Clinic Proceedings. She holds a Ph.D. from Texas A&M University, an M.B.A. from Stanford University, and a B.A. in economics from Duke University. She has 15 years of executive responsibility in large (Frito- Lay, Time Warner) and small organizations; in consumer, business-to- business, and nonprofit (chamber of commerce) settings; and earlier experience in government (Federal Reserve Board). Fran H. Norris, Ph.D., is a community psychologist and a research professor in the department of psychiatry at Dartmouth Medical School, where she is affiliated with the National Center for PTSD and the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START). She is also the director of the NIMH-funded National Center for Disaster Mental Health Research. Her research interests include post-traumatic stress, post-disaster mobilization of social support, and community resilience. Rebecca Pille, Ph.D., is the director of Health Promotion & Wellness at the National Security Agency (NSA), where she has more than 33 years of federal service. She received a B.A. in Russian language/Soviet area studies from the University of Texas/Arlington in 1977, an M.S. in applied behavioral science from Johns Hopkins University in 1999, and a postgraduate certificate in Wellness Counseling and Body-Mind Consciousness from the Institute of Transpersonal Psychology in 2007. She is currently a Ph.D. student at Northcentral University, where she is specializing in health psychology and behavioral medicine; projected graduation is spring 2013. Before she became director of Health Promotion & Wellness, Ms. Pille was on the team as a health educator specializing in whole-person approaches to health and wellness, to include complementary and alternative medicine. She spearheaded the development of the Full Engagement Program (a program recognized by

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225 APPENDIX C two 2011 RAND studies as a best practice for resiliency), reinvigorated the weekly meditation group, and expanded the way the agency’s worldwide workforce receives programs and services. She now leads a small but mighty team of health professionals whose overarching goal is population health management. This year, her work experience, leadership, and academic strength in the wellness field earned Ms. Pille the designation of Certified Wellness Practitioner by the National Wellness Institute. Dennis Reber, M.A., Ph.D., is the managing director of Global Learning and Development at FedEx. He focuses on how HR initiatives can have a positive effect on a company’s bottom line. Since assuming his role in 2009, Dr. Reber has played a key role in incorporating loyalty, an integral FedEx value, into employee measurement indices. Employee loyalty results in improved customer loyalty and retention. Under Dr. Reber’s direction, FedEx has further strengthened its focus on its employees. This takes its form in everything from revised performance reviews to performance measurements to training, which has shifted toward a more experiential and recurrent basis. Dr. Reber has been instrumental in establishing the FedEx Talent Management Program to recognize and assess high talent in employees. In all his undertakings, he has kept an operations focus, which enables him to see and understand the realities of the big picture and the measurable effect that employees and programs have on the bottom line. Since joining FedEx as package handler in 1974, Dr. Reber has consulted in a myriad of different areas of the company. These experiences have afforded him the opportunity to develop a comprehensive overview of FedEx and its operations and services. Additionally, Dr. Reber has an extensive background in management in human resource development, specializing in organization design and development, strategic planning, mergers and acquisitions, high-performance teams, talent and performance management, leadership development, and large-scale change efforts. Reber is a recipient of the FedEx Five Star Award, the company’s most prestigious award for recognizing outstanding achievements. Dr. Reber received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in organization development from the University of Memphis. He then went on to receive his Ph.D. in human resource development from Vanderbilt University. Dori Reissman, M.D., M.P.H., has been with the U.S. Public Health Service, based within CDC, since 1997. She provides leadership and

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226 BUILDING A RESILIENT WORKFORCE expertise in the integration of behavioral health and resilience into occupational safety and health policy and practice. Dr. Reissman has provided expertise in a variety of topics surrounding emergency preparedness and response and workforce health studies through involvement in expert workshops, federal advisory panels, emergency response work, field scientific research, public health program operations, and national policy formulation. She serves as a senior medical advisor to the director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and is the medical director of the newly authorized World Trade Center Health Program, which serves 50,000 people adversely impacted by the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Nancy Rothbard, Ph.D., is the David Pottruck Associate Professor of Management at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. She received her A.B. from Brown University and her Ph.D. in organizational behavior and human resource management from the University of Michigan. Prior to joining the Wharton School in 2000, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University. Her research focuses on how factors outside the workplace influence people’s motivation and engagement with their work. She has studied the enriching and depleting effects of the spillover of mood and emotion between work and nonwork roles and how people cope with these potential spillovers by segmenting work and nonwork roles. Her recent work on start-of-workday positive and negative mood shows that these factors affect two aspects of performance: productivity and quality. Her work on boundary management has also led to a recent examination of how online social networking affects the ways people interact with their leaders, peers, and subordinates in the workplace. She is a senior editor at Organization Science and is on the editorial boards of Academy of Management Review and Administrative Science Quarterly. Kimberly Smith-Jentsch, Ph.D., is currently an associate professor in the department of psychology at the University of Central Florida (UCF). Dr. Smith-Jentsch received her Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from the University of South Florida in 1994. From that time until 2003 she was a research psychologist for the Navy. Dr. Smith-Jentsch joined the faculty at UCF in the fall of 2003. Her research focuses on team performance and training in stressful environments such as military and commercial aviation, law enforcement, and most recently long-duration space flight. Throughout her career, Dr. Smith-Jentsch has been awarded

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227 APPENDIX C more than $6 million in contracts and grants to study these topics. She has also earned a number of awards for her work, including the M. Scott Myers Award for Applied Research in the Workplace (2001), the Dr. Arthur E. Bisson Award for Naval Technology Achievement (2000), and the NAVAIR Senior Scientist Award (2000). Dr. Smith-Jentsch’s research has been published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Journal of Vocational Behavior, and Human Factors. Her research has been cited more than 1,000 times to date. She is currently a member of the editorial boards for the Journal of Applied Psychology and the Journal of Business and Psychology. Rear Admiral Mark J. Tedesco, M.D., M.P.H., is the Coast Guard’s chief medical officer and director of Health, Safety and Work-Life. Rear Adm. Tedesco is trained and board certified in family medicine and preventive medicine (aerospace) and a designated Coast Guard flight surgeon. Rear Adm. Tedesco graduated with a B.S. degree from Tufts University in 1980 and received his M.D. from Tufts University in 1986. He completed his family practice residency at Ft. Belvoir, Virginia, in 1989. He received a M.P.H. in health care management from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1994 and completed his aerospace medicine residency at Brooks Air Force Base in 1995. Prior to his current assignment, Rear Adm. Tedesco served as the chief of the Coast Guard’s Operational Medicine and Medical Readiness Division at Coast Guard headquarters in Washington, DC. Prior to that, he was the Medical Readiness Branch Chief at Coast Guard headquarters. Preceding his transfer to the Public Health Service and Coast Guard in 1997, he served as an Army physician. His assignments included chief of the Primary Care Department and acting deputy commander for the Army’s Aeromedical Center and hospital at Ft. Rucker, Alabama, as well as serving as the flight surgeon for the 224th Army Military Intelligence (Aerial) Battalion and the Coast Guard’s Air Station Savannah at Hunter Army Airfield in Savannah, Georgia. He also served as the Treatment Platoon Leader in the 24th Infantry Division (Mech) in Saudi Arabia and Iraq during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. His Coast Guard experience includes underway support aboard Coast Guard Cutter Barque Eagle, medical support during MEDEVAC operations, patrol boat mishap response operations, and clinical support to numerous Coast Guard clinics and sick bays. Rear Adm. Tedesco also served as medical director of operations for federal disaster response teams at the World

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228 BUILDING A RESILIENT WORKFORCE Trade Center disaster site in September 2001. Rear Adm. Tedesco’s awards and decorations include the Meritorious Service Medal (3rd award), Coast Guard, Public Health Service, and Army Commendation Medals and the Department of Transportation’s 9-11 Medal. He was selected as the U.S. Army Aerospace Medicine Specialist of the Year in 1997 and as the U.S. Public Health Service Physician Executive of the Year in 2005. He is designated as both a Coast Guard flight surgeon and an Army senior flight surgeon and has been awarded the Army’s Expert Field Medic Badge and Paratrooper Wings. Robert J. Ursano, M.D., is professor of psychiatry and neuroscience and the chairman of the department of psychiatry at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. He is founding director of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress. In addition, Dr. Ursano is editor of Psychiatry, the distinguished journal of interpersonal and biological processes, founded by Harry Stack Sullivan. Dr. Ursano completed 20 of years service in the Air Force medical corps and retired as a colonel in 1991. He was educated at the University of Notre Dame and the Yale University School of Medicine and did his psychiatric training at Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center and Yale University. Dr. Ursano served as the Department of Defense representative to the National Advisory Mental Health Council of the National Institute of Mental Health and is a past member of the Veterans Affairs Mental Health Study Section and the National Institute of Mental Health Rapid Trauma and Disaster Grant Review Section. He is a Distinguished Life Fellow in the American Psychiatric Association. He is a fellow of the American College of Psychiatrists. Dr. Ursano was the first chairman of the American Psychiatric Association’s Committee on Psychiatric Dimensions of Disaster. This work greatly aided the integration of psychiatry and public health in times of disaster and terrorism. Dr. Ursano was an invited participant to the White House Mental Health Conference in 1999. He has received the Department of Defense Humanitarian Service Award and the highest award of the International Traumatic Stress Society, the Lifetime Achievement Award, for “outstanding and fundamental contributions to understanding traumatic stress.” He is the recipient of the William C. Porter Award from the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States, and he is a frequent advisor on issues surrounding psychological response to trauma to the highest levels of the U.S. government and specifically to Department of Defense leadership. Dr. Ursano has served as a member

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229 APPENDIX C of the National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine, Committee on Psychological Responses to Terrorism, Committee on PTSD and Compensation, and the Committee on Nuclear Preparedness; and the National Institute of Mental Health Task Force on Mental Health Surveillance After Terrorist Attack. In addition, he is a member of scientific advisory boards to the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Ursano has more than 300 publications. He is co-author or editor of 8 books. Bryan Vila, Ph.D., is professor of criminal justice at Washington State University (WSU) and director of the Simulated Hazardous Operational Tasks lab in its Sleep and Performance Research Center. Prior to joining WSU in 2005, he was director of Crime Control and Prevention Research at the U.S. National Institute for Justice for 3 years. He earned a Ph.D. in 1990 from the University of California, Davis, and previously was a tenured professor at the University of California and the University of Wyoming. Prior to becoming an academic, Dr. Vila served as a law enforcement officer and executive from 1969 to 1986. He has published more than 50 articles based on his research, as well as 4 books, including Tired Cops: The Importance of Managing Police Fatigue (2000) and Micronesian Blues (2009). David Woods, Ph.D., is a professor at Ohio State University in the Insti- tute for Ergonomics and past president of the Human Factors and Ergo- nomics Society. From his initial work following the Three Mile Island accident in nuclear power, to studies of coordination breakdowns be- tween people and automation in aviation accidents, to his role in today’s national debates about patient safety, he has studied how human and team cognition contributes to success and failure in complex, high-risk systems. Dr. Woods received his B.A. in psychology from Canisius Col- lege and his M.S. in experimental psychology and Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Purdue University.

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