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Appendix K

Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

PAUL R. VOSS (Chair) is fellow and interim director at the Carolina Population Center and senior spatial analyst at the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is also emeritus professor of rural sociology at the University of Wisconsin and was director of the University of Wisconsin Applied Population Laboratory. His research interests are in applied demography, including small-area demographic models of population estimation and projection, as well as human migration, environmental demography, and spatial statistics. He has written extensively on the use and applicability of census and American Community Survey data in small communities. He served on the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Decennial Census Advisory Committee as representative of the Population Association of America as well as the U.S. Census Bureau’s advisory committee of professional associations. At the National Research Council, he chaired the Committee on National Statistics Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census and also served on the Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas. He has an M.A. and a Ph.D. in sociology (demography) from the University of Michigan.

WILLIAM A.V. CLARK is professor of statistics and geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research is focused on demographic change and the nature of the spatial outcomes of population migration flows. He is currently investigating the interaction of class, race, and geography in metropolitan areas. He has published numerous research articles and books. He served on the editorial board of a number of journals, including Popula-,



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Appendix K Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff PAUL R. VOSS (Chair) is fellow and interim director at the Carolina Popula- tion Center and senior spatial analyst at the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is also emeritus professor of rural sociology at the University of Wisconsin and was director of the University of Wisconsin Applied Population Laboratory. His research interests are in applied demography, including small-area demographic models of population estimation and projection, as well as human migration, environmental demography, and spatial statistics. He has written extensively on the use and applicability of census and American Community Survey data in small communities. He served on the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Decennial Census Advisory Committee as representative of the Population Association of America as well as the U.S. Census Bureau’s advisory committee of professional associations. At the National Research Council, he chaired the Committee on National Statistics Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census and also served on the Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geo - graphic Areas. He has an M.A. and a Ph.D. in sociology (demography) from the University of Michigan. WILLIAM A.V. CLARK is professor of statistics and geography at the Uni- versity of California, Los Angeles. His research is focused on demographic change and the nature of the spatial outcomes of population migration flows. He is currently investigating the interaction of class, race, and geography in metropolitan areas. He has published numerous research articles and books. He served on the editorial board of a number of journals, including Popula- 159

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160 SMALL POPULATIONS, LARGE EFFECTS tion, Space and Place, the Journal of Urban Affairs, Population and Environment, and Urban Geography. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has served on a number of National Research Council committees, and he is currently on the Transportation Research Board Executive Committee and the Geographical Sciences Committee. He has a Ph.D. in geography from the University of Illinois. SUSAN COPELLA is director of the Pennsylvania State Data Center at Penn- sylvania State University. She is chair of the Federal State Cooperative Program for Population Projections, state representative to the Federal State Coop - erative Program for Population Estimates, and member of its group quarters subcommittee. Her experience includes working with the U.S. Census Bureau to review population estimates and to coordinate the Local Update of Census Addresses, the Participants Statistical Areas Program, and the 2010 Count Review Program, including a review of housing units and group quarters. Prior to joining the State Data Center, she worked in a number of urban and regional planning agencies. She has a B.A. in urban studies and geography from the University of Pittsburgh. DAVID DOLSON is director of the Social Survey Methods Division at Sta- tistics Canada, where he is responsible for all statistical and survey methods in support of the Census of Population, including the program of postcensal sur- veys, the Geography Division, and the demographic statistics program. He also oversees the Statistical Consultation Group, the Questionnaire Design Resource Centre, and the Data Analysis Resource Centre. He directs the development, testing, evaluation, and implementation of statistical and survey methods, using a variety of data collection modes, including supplementing questionnaire data with information obtained from administrative records. He consulted with the U.S. Census Bureau staff on the Reverse Record Check methodology for cen - sus coverage measurement and participated in expert workshops on the U.S. census coverage measurement program and coverage improvement options for the 2020 U.S. census. He has a master of mathematics degree in statistics from the University of Waterloo. RALPH FOLSOM is chief scientist at RTI International, with expertise in complex sample design and analysis, small-area estimation, missing data impu - tation, and survey weight adjustment. Working on the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), which is based on a sample of individuals living both in households and in group quarters, he initiated innovative weight adjustment methods based on his logistic response propensity and exponential poststratification models. He has also introduced model-based imputations for missing frequency of use and income data items, and he has been an influential collaborator in the development of the NSDUH Predictive Mean Neighbor-

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161 APPENDIX K hoods imputation methodology. For the last decade and a half, he has led RTI’s work in small-area estimation research, including the NSDUH team that develops annual small-area estimates for drug use, dependency, and treatment or treatment need for states and biannual estimates for substate areas. He has an M.S. in statistics from Iowa State University and a Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of North Carolina. RACHEL HARTER is a senior research statistician at RTI International (for- merly a senior fellow and vice president at the National Opinion Research Cen- ter [NORC] at the University of Chicago). She evaluated alternative substate estimators of employment for Illinois and managed the development of a pro- duction small-area estimation system using the Current Employment Statistics survey and related programs of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. She managed the planning stages for NORC’s national sampling frame of addresses for in-person surveys. She recently worked on the Survey of Doctorate Recipients for the National Science Foundation and the Residential Energy Consumption Survey for the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Her current projects focus on address-based sampling and telephone sampling. She is council of sections representative for the Survey Research Methods Section of the American Sta - tistical Association and former program chair for the Survey Research Methods Section of the American Statistical Association. She has an M.S. and a Ph.D. in statistics from Iowa State University. STEVEN HEERINGA is a research scientist in the University of Michigan Survey Methodology Program, director of the Statistical and Research Design Group in the Survey Research Center (SRC), and director of the Summer Institute in Survey Research Techniques at the Institute for Social Research. He is on the faculty of the Michigan Program in Survey Methodology and the Joint Program in Survey Methodology and is an adjunct associate professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Michigan. He has over 25 years of statistical sampling experience, directing the development of the SRC national sample design, as well as sample designs for SRC’s major longitudinal and cross-sectional survey programs. He has contributed as a consulting statisti - cian to a number of international research projects and ongoing data collections and has published on sample design methods and procedures, such as weight - ing, variance estimation, and the imputation of missing data. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and has an M.S. in statistics and a Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of Michigan. KRISZTINA MARTON (Study Director) is senior program officer with the Committee on National Statistics. She is currently serving as study director for the Panel on Redesigning the Commercial Buildings and Residential Energy Consumption Surveys of the U.S. Energy Information Administration and the

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162 SMALL POPULATIONS, LARGE EFFECTS Workshop on the Future of Federal Household Surveys. Previously, she was a survey researcher at Mathematica Policy Research (MPR), where she conducted methodological research and oversaw data collections for the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and other clients. Prior to joining MPR, she was a survey director in the Ohio State University Center for Survey Research. She has a Ph.D. in communica - tion, with an interdisciplinary specialization in survey research, from Ohio State University. JOSEPH SALVO is director of the Population Division at the New York City Department of City Planning. His background includes a year at the U.S. Cen - sus Bureau. He has broad expertise in the application of small-area data for policies and programs, and uses of census data to address the concerns of local government. A past president of the Association of Public Data Users, he has served on various advisory committees to the Census Bureau. He has experi - ence with the Census Bureau’s Master Address File and TIGER geographic database, and he has been involved in the evaluation of the American Com- munity Survey since its inception. At the National Research Council, he served on the Panel on the Functionality and Usability of Data from the American Community Survey and the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods, and he chaired the Local Update of Census Addresses working group. He has an M.A. and a Ph.D. in sociology from Fordham University, is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, and is a recipient of the Sloan Public Service Award from the Fund for the City of New York. RICHARD VALLIANT is a research professor at the Joint Program for Sur- vey Methodology at the University of Maryland, and Survey Research Center, University of Michigan. He was formerly an associate director at Westat and a mathematical statistician with the Bureau of Labor Statistics. His 30 years of applied experience includes survey sampling, estimation theory, and statistical computing for establishment and household surveys. At the National Research Council, he served on the Panel to Review Research and Development Statistics at the National Science Foundation. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, a former member of the Census Advisory Council, and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He has served as associ- ate editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association—Theory and Methods, the Journal of the American Statistical Association—Applications and Case Studies, the Journal of Official Statistics, and Survey Methodology. He has an M.S. in statistics from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in biostatistics from Johns Hopkins University.