B

Committee Biographies

CHARLES O. “CHAD” HOLLIDAY [NAE] is former chairman and chief executive officer of DuPont. He became chief executive officer in 1998 and chairman. He started at DuPont in 1970 at DuPont’s Old Hickory site after receiving a B.S. in industrial engineering from the University of Tennessee. He is a licensed professional engineer. Mr. Holliday is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering, and he is past chairman of the Business Roundtable’s Task Force for Environment, Technology, and Economy; the World Business Council for Sustainable Development; The Business Council; and the Society of Chemical Industry—American Section. Mr. Holliday serves on the board of directors of Deere & Co. and is chair of the board of directors of Catalyst. In addition, he is chairman emeritus of the Council on Competitiveness and is a founding member of the International Business Council. He is currently a member of the NRC Committee on America’s Climate Choices and was a member of the Committee on Prospering in the Global Economy of the 21st Century which authored Rising Above the Gathering Storm.

PETER C. AGRE [NAS/IOM] is professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and director of the Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute. In 1970, Dr. Agre earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Augsburg College. He received his medical doctorate from Johns Hopkins in 1974. From 1975 to 1978 he completed his clinical training in internal medicine at Case Western University’s Case Medical Center. In 1981, after post-graduate medical training and then a fellowship at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dr. Agre returned to



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B Committee Biographies CHARLES O. “CHAD” HOLLIDAY [NAE] is former chairman and chief executive officer of DuPont. He became chief executive officer in 1998 and chairman. He started at DuPont in 1970 at DuPont’s Old Hickory site after receiving a B.S. in industrial engineering from the University of Ten- nessee. He is a licensed professional engineer. Mr. Holliday is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering, and he is past chairman of the Business Roundtable’s Task Force for Environment, Technology, and Economy; the World Business Council for Sustainable Development; The Business Council; and the Society of Chemical Industry—American Section. Mr. Holliday serves on the board of directors of Deere & Co. and is chair of the board of directors of Catalyst. In addition, he is chairman emeritus of the Council on Competitiveness and is a founding member of the International Business Council. He is currently a member of the NRC Committee on America’s Climate Choices and was a member of the Com- mittee on Prospering in the Global Economy of the 21st Century which authored Rising Above the Gathering Storm. PETER C. AGRE [NAS/IOM] is professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and director of the Johns Hopkins Malaria Re- search Institute. In 1970, Dr. Agre earned his bachelor’s degree in chemis- try from Augsburg College. He received his medical doctorate from Johns Hopkins in 1974. From 1975 to 1978 he completed his clinical training in internal medicine at Case Western University’s Case Medical Center. In 1981, after post-graduate medical training and then a fellowship at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dr. Agre returned to 195

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196 APPENDIX B Hopkins, where he progressed through the ranks of the departments of medicine and cell biology. In 1993, he was recruited by then-department director Daniel Lane, Ph.D., to become a professor in the department of biological chemistry. He then served as the vice chancellor for science and technology at Duke University Medical Center where he guided the development of Duke’s biomedical research. In 2008, he took his current position at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Agre was elected to membership in the Na- tional Academy of Sciences in 2000, to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2003, and to the Institute of Medicine in 2005. He holds two U.S. patents on the isolation, cloning and expression of aquaporins 1 and 5, and he is the principal investigator on four current National Institutes of Health grants. Dr. Agre was awarded the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemis- try by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. The Academy recognized him for his laboratory’s 1991 discovery of the long-sought “channels” that regulate and facilitate water molecule transport through cell membranes, a process essential to all living organisms. He is a member of the Com- mittee on Human Rights of the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. In February 2009, Dr. Agre was inducted as the 169th President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). ENRIQUETA BOND [IOM] served, from 1994 to 2008, as the first full- time president of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund (BWF), a private, in- dependent foundation dedicated to advancing the medical sciences by supporting research and other scientific and educational activities. During her presidency, Dr. Bond guided BWF in its transition from a corporate to a private independent foundation and its endowment grew from $400 million to $800 million. Prior to joining the BWF, Dr. Bond served as the chief executive officer for the Institute of Medicine. In 1997, Dr. Bond was elected as a full member to the Institute of Medicine. In 2004, she was elected as a fellow to the American Association for the Advancement of Science for her distinguished contributions to the study and analysis of policy for the advancement of the health sciences. Dr. Bond is chairman of the National Research Council’s Board on African Science Academy Development and a member of the Forum on Microbial Threats. She is a past member of the Report Review Committee as well as numerous other study committees. Dr. Bond is the recipient of numerous honors, includ- ing the 2008 Order of the Long Leaf Pine award from the state of North Carolina. This is the highest honor the governor can bestow on a citizen and was awarded to Dr. Bond for her efforts to improve science educa- tion for children of North Carolina. She has also received the Institute of Medicine Walsh McDermott Medal, in recognition of distinguished service to the National Academies, and the National Academy of Sciences

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APPENDIX B 197 Professional Staff Award. She received her bachelor’s degree from Welles- ley College, her M.A. from the University of Virginia, and her Ph.D. in molecular biology and biochemical genetics from Georgetown University. C.W. “PAUL” CHU [NAS] is T.L.L. Temple Chair of Science and profes- sor of physics at the University of Houston and served from 2001 to 2009 as president of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Dr. Chu was born in Hunan, China, and received his bachelor of science from Cheng-Kung University in Taiwan. After service with the Nationalist Chi- nese Air Force, he earned his master of science from Fordham University and his doctorate at the University of California at San Diego. All three degrees were in physics. He is a pioneer in the field of high-temperature superconductivity whose groundbreaking research has earned him global recognition. After 2 years of industrial research with Bell Laboratories, Dr. Chu took an academic appointment at Cleveland State University. He stayed there for 9 years. He assumed his appointment at the University of Houston in 1979. At various times, he has served as a consultant and a visiting staff member at Bell Labs, Los Alamos National Lab, the Marshall Space Flight Center, Argonne National Lab, and DuPont. He is the found- ing director of the Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston and serves as the center’s senior science adviser. Dr. Chu is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the American Acad- emy of Arts and Sciences, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Academia Sinica, and the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World. He also was elected a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Engineering. Dr. Chu has received numerous awards, including the 1988 National Medal of Science, the highest honor possible for a scientist in the United States, for his work on high-temperature superconductivity. The White House ap- pointed Dr. Chu to be among 12 distinguished scientists who will evaluate National Medal of Science nominees. He also has been awarded the Bernd Matthias Prize and the John Fritz Medal, which he holds with science and engineering icons such as Alexander Graham Bell and Thomas Edison. FRANCISCO G. CIGARROA [IOM] was appointed the 10th chancellor of The University of Texas (UT) System by the UT System Board of Re- gents on January 9, 2009. He began his service as the UT System’s chief administrative officer on February 2, 2009. As chancellor, Dr. Cigarroa oversees one of the largest public systems of higher education in the na- tion, with nine universities and six health institutions, an annual operat- ing budget of $11.5 billion (FY 2009), including $2.5 billion in sponsored programs funded by federal, state, local and private sources, and more than 194,000 students and 84,000 employees. Dr. Cigarroa also serves as vice chairman for policy on the Board of Directors of The University of

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198 APPENDIX B Texas Investment Management Co. (UTIMCO). A nationally renowned pediatric and transplant surgeon, Dr. Cigarroa served as president of the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio from 2000 until his appointment as chancellor. A native of Laredo, Dr. Cigarroa earned a bachelor’s degree from Yale in 1979 and received his medical degree with highest honors from UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas in 1983. He has com- pleted 12 years of postgraduate training. He was chief resident at Har- vard’s teaching hospital, Massachusetts General in Boston, and completed a fellowship at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. In 1995, he joined the UT Health Science Center faculty in San Antonio. Dr. Cigarroa was on the surgical team that in 1997 split a donor liver for transplant into two recipi- ents; it was the first operation of its type in Texas. In 2000, he headed the team that performed South Texas’ first successful pediatric small bowel transplant. Immediately prior to his appointment as president, he served as director of pediatric surgery. He serves on the medical staffs of Uni- versity Hospital, CHRISTUS Santa Rosa Hospital-Downtown, CHRISTUS Santa Rosa Children’s Hospital, CHRISTUS Santa Rosa Hospital-Medical Center and the Baptist Health System, and as a consultant at Method- ist Children’s Hospital. A member of the Institute of Medicine of The National Academies, Dr. Cigarroa is a fellow of the American College of Surgery and a Diplomate of the American Board of Surgery and has received a certificate in pediatric surgery from the American Board of Surgery. He is an accomplished researcher who has published scientific papers on principles of surgery in infants and children. His many profes- sional affiliations include the American Medical Association, Texas Medi- cal Association and Bexar County Medical Society. He is also a member of the Board of Directors of the Greater San Antonio Chamber of Commerce, the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and United Way of San Antonio and Bexar County. JAMES DUDERSTADT [NAE] is president emeritus and University Pro- fessor of Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan. After a year as an Atomic Energy Commission Postdoctoral Fellow at Caltech, he joined the faculty of the University of Michigan in 1968 in the Depart- ment of Nuclear Engineering, rising through the ranks to full professor in 1975. In 1981, Dr. Duderstadt became dean of the College of Engineering and, in 1986, provost and vice president for Academic Affairs in 1986. He was elected president of the University of Michigan in 1988 and served in this role until July 1996. He currently holds a university-wide faculty appointment as University Professor of Science and Engineering, co-chairing the University’s program in Science, Technology, and Public Policy and directing the Millennium Project, a research center exploring the impact of over-the-horizon technologies on society. During his career,

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APPENDIX B 199 Dr. Duderstadt has received numerous national awards for his research, teaching, and service activities, including the E. O. Lawrence Award for excellence in nuclear research, the Arthur Holly Compton Prize for out- standing teaching, the Reginald Wilson Award for national leadership in achieving diversity, and the National Medal of Technology for exemplary service to the nation. He has been elected to numerous honorific societies including the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Phi Beta Kappa, and Tau Beta Pi. Dr. Duderstadt is a past chair of the National Science Board and was a member of the National Commission on the Future of Higher Education (The “Spell- ings Commission”). He is chair of the NRC’s Policy and Global Affairs Committee and a former member of Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP). He chaired a series of COSEPUP studies providing observations on the President’s annual federal science and technology budgets and chaired or served on numerous other Academies’ committees. Dr. Duderstadt received a B.Eng. in electrical engineering with highest honors from Yale University in 1964 and a M.S. and Ph.D. in engineering science and physics from the California Institute of Technol- ogy in 1967. RONALD G. EHRENBERG is the Irving M. Ives Professor of Industrial and Labor Relations and Economics at Cornell University and a Stephen H. Weiss Presidential Fellow, the highest award for undergraduate teach- ing that exists, at Cornell. He also is Director of the Cornell Higher Educa- tion Research Institute. He was an elected member of the Cornell Board of Trustees from July 2006 to June 2010 and currently serves as a member of the Board of Trustees for the State University of New York (SUNY). From July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1998 he also served as Cornell’s Vice President for Academic Programs, Planning, and Budgeting. Ehrenberg is a founding member of the National Academy of Social Insurance (Unemployment Insurance section), a National Associate of the National Academies, a member of the National Academy of Education, a fellow of the Society of Labor Economists, a fellow of the TIAA-CREF Institute, and a fellow of the American Education Research Association. He is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a research fellow at IZA (Berlin), was a member of the Executive Committee of the American Eco- nomic Association, chaired the AAUP Committees on Retirement and the Economic Status of the Profession, and is past president of the Society of Labor Economists. He also chaired the NRC’s Board of Higher Education and Workforce, served on its committee on Gender Differences in the Ca- reers of Science, Engineering and Mathematics Faculty, and serves on its committee studying the measurement of productivity in higher education. He is the author of Tuition Rising: Why College Costs So Much (Harvard

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200 APPENDIX B University Press, 2002); a coauthor of Educating Scholars: Doctoral Educa- tion in the Humanities (Princeton University Press, (2010), the editor of American University: National Treasure or Endangered Species (Cornell University Press, 1997), Governing Academia (Cornell University Press, 2004), What’s Happening to Public Higher Education? (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007), and the co-editor of Science and the University (University of Wisconsin Press, 2007) and Doctoral Education and the Faculty of the Future (Cornell University Press, 2008). Dr. Ehrenberg has supervised the dissertations of 44 Ph.D. students and served on com- mittees for countless more. He is also passionate about undergraduate education, involves undergraduate students in his research, and has co- authored papers with a number of these undergraduates. In 2003, ILR- Cornell awarded him the General Mills Foundation Award for Exemplary Undergraduate Teaching. Dr. Ehrenberg received a B.A. in mathematics from Harpur College (State University of New York-Binghamton) in 1966, M.A. and Ph.D. in economics from Northwestern University in 1970, an Honorary Doctor of Science from SUNY in 2008, and an Honorary Doctor- ate of Humane Letters from Pennsylvania State University in 2011. WILLIAM FRIST, JR., is both a nationally recognized heart and lung transplant surgeon and former U.S. Senate Majority Leader. He is cur- rently University Distinguished Professor of Health Care at Vanderbilt University and a partner at Cressey & Company LP, a private invest- ment firm focused on the healthcare industry. He recently served as the Frederick H. Schultz Class of 1951 Visiting Professor of International Economic Policy at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Dr. Frist majored in health policy as an undergraduate at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Pub- lic and International Affairs before graduating with honors from Harvard Medical School and completing surgical training at Massachusetts Gen- eral Hospital and Stanford. As the founder and director of the Vanderbilt Multi-Organ Transplant Center, he has performed more than 150 heart and lung transplants. He has authored more than 100 peer-reviewed medical articles and chapters, over 400 newspaper articles, and 7 books on topics such as bioterrorism, transplantation, and leadership. He is board certified in both general and heart surgery. Dr. Frist represented Tennes- see in the U.S. Senate for 12 years where he served on both committees responsible for writing health legislation (Health and Finance). He was elected Majority Leader of the Senate, having served fewer total years in Congress than any person chosen to lead that body in history. His lead- ership was instrumental in passage of prescription drug legislation and funding to fight HIV in the United States and globally.

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APPENDIX B 201 WILLIAM GREEN is chairman and chief executive officer of Accenture, a U.S. $21.6 billion global management consulting technology services and outsourcing company. In addition to chairing the board of directors, Mr. Green is responsible for managing the company, formulating and execut- ing long-term strategies and for all interactions with clients, employees, investors and other stakeholders. Mr. Green is Accenture’s primary deci- sion maker and policy maker, setting the tone for the company’s values, ethics, and culture. He has served on Accenture’s board of directors since its inception in 2001. Mr. Green joined Accenture in 1977 and became a partner in 1986. Mr. Green represents Accenture in a number of external venues, including the Business Roundtable, where he serves as chairman of its Education, Innovation and Workforce Initiative, and as chairman of The Springboard Project, an independent commission on workforce issues. He is a member of the Business Higher Education Forum. He attended Dean College and is a member of its Board of Trustees. He received a bachelor of science degree in economics and a master of busi- ness administration from Babson College, as well as an honorary doctor of laws. JOHN L. HENNESSY [NAS/NAE] is president of Stanford University. He joined Stanford’s faculty in 1977 as an assistant professor of electrical engineering. He rose through the academic ranks to full professorship in 1986 and was the inaugural Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Profes- sor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from 1987 to 2004. From 1983 to 1993, Dr. Hennessy was director of the Computer Systems Laboratory, a research and teaching center operated by the Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science that fosters research in computer systems design. A pioneer in computer architecture, in 1981 Dr. Hennessy drew together researchers to focus on a computer architecture known as RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer), a technology that has revolutionized the computer industry by increasing performance while reducing costs. In addition to his role in basic research, Dr. Hennessy helped transfer this technology to industry. In 1984, he cofounded MIPS Computer Systems, now MIPS Technologies, which designs micropro- cessors. In recent years, his research has focused on the architecture of high-performance computers. He served as chair of computer science from 1994 to 1996 and, in 1996, was named dean of the School of Engi- neering. In 1999, he was named provost, the university’s chief academic and financial officer. As provost, he continued his efforts to foster inter- disciplinary activities in the biosciences and bioengineering and oversaw improvements in faculty and staff compensation. In October 2000, he was inaugurated as Stanford University’s 10th president. In 2005, he became

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202 APPENDIX B the inaugural holder of the Bing Presidential Professorship. Dr. Hennessy is a recipient of the 2000 IEEE John von Neumann Medal, the 2000 ASEE Benjamin Garver Lamme Award, the 2001 ACM Eckert-Mauchly Award, the 2001 Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award, a 2004 NEC C&C Prize for lifetime achievement in computer science and engineering and a 2005 Founders Award from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Na- tional Academy of Sciences, and he is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He is currently a member of the NRC’s Board on Global Science and Technology and the Co-Chair of the Committee on Scientific Communication and National Security. Dr. Hennessy earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Villanova University and his master’s and doctoral degrees in computer science from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. WALTER E. MASSEY is president of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, the former president of Morehouse College, and recently retired chairman of the board of Bank of America. Immediately prior to More- house, Massey was provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at the University of California. In this position, the second most senior position in the UC system, he was responsible for academic and research planning and policy, budget planning and allocations, and programmatic oversight of the three national laboratories the University manages for the Department of Energy: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Earlier, Massey held a range of administrative and academic positions. He is former director of the National Science Foundation, a position to which he was appointed by former President George H.W. Bush. Massey also served as vice president for research and professor of physics at the University of Chicago, as director of the Argonne National Laboratory, dean of the College and professor of physics at Brown University and as assistant professor of physics at the University of Illinois. Massey is a past chair of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) and a former member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technol- ogy. He is a fellow and past president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a fellow and past vice president of the American Physical Society, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society and the Council on Foreign Relations. Massey’s research has involved the study of quantum liquids and solids. His written work has also addressed science and math educa- tion, the role of science in a democratic society, and university-industry interactions and technology transfer in national and international settings.

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APPENDIX B 203 He is the recipient of more than 30 honorary degrees from institutions such as Yale University, Northwestern University, Amherst, and the Ohio State University. Dr. Massey holds a bachelor of science in physics and mathematics in 1958 from Morehouse and a master’s and doctorate in physics in 1966 from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. BURTON J. MCMURTRY has been a Silicon Valley venture capital in- vestor since 1969. He co-founded several venture capital partnerships, including Technology Venture Investors (TVI) and Institutional Venture Associates. Portfolio companies included Adaptec, Altera, Compaq, In- tuit, KLA-Tencor, Linear Technology Corporation, Microsoft, NBI, Nellcor, PMC Sierra, Quantum, ROLM Corporation, SpectraLink, Sun Microsys- tems, Synopsys, Triad Systems Corporation, VeriFone, and Visio. Mr. McMurtry formerly chaired the board of trustees of Stanford University and served as a trustee of Rice University and of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. He served as chairman of the National Venture Capital Association and of the Western Association of Venture Capitalists. From 1957 until 1969 he worked for GTE-Sylvania in microwave and laser research and engineering. A native of Houston, Texas, he holds B.A. and BSEE degrees from Rice University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electri- cal engineering from Stanford University. ERNEST MONIZ is the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems, director of the Energy Initiative, and director of the Laboratory for Energy and the Environment at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has served on the faculty since 1973. Dr. Moniz served as Under Secretary of the Department of Energy from 1997 until January 2001 and, from 1995 to 1997, as associate director for Science in the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President. At DOE, he had oversight of the science and energy programs, led a comprehensive review of nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship, and served as the Secretary’s special negotiator for Russian nuclear ma- terials disposition programs. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and received the 1998 Seymour Cray HPCC Industry Recogni- tion Award for vision and leadership in advancing scientific simulation. He has served on several NRC committees, including the Committee on Evaluation of Quantification of Margins and Uncertainty (QMU) Meth- odology Applied to the Certification of the Nation’s Nuclear Weapons Stockpile and the Committee on Transportation of Radioactive Waste. Dr. Moniz received a Bachelor of Science degree summa cum laude in phys- ics from Boston College, a doctorate in theoretical physics from Stanford University, and honorary doctorates from the University of Athens, the University of Erlangen-Nurenberg, and Michigan State University.

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204 APPENDIX B HEATHER MUNROE-BLUM became 16th principal (president) and vice-chancellor and senior officer of McGill University in 2003. An ac- complished scholar in the fields of epidemiology and public policy and a distinguished administrator, Professor Munroe-Blum is a member of McGill’s Faculty of Medicine and a professor in the Department of Epi- demiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health. She is the author of the report “Growing Ontario’s Innovation System: The Strategic Role of Uni- versity Research” that led to the creation of a new framework of science policies and programs in Ontario. Among her main objectives as principal of McGill is a commitment to strengthen the university’s leadership at the world level with respect to research, graduate education, student experi- ence, and positive societal contribution. Professor Munroe-Blum serves on numerous not-for-profit and private boards. Prior to assuming the position of principal at McGill, she served at the University of Toronto as a professor, a governor, dean of Social Work, and as vice-president of Research and International Relations (1994-2002). She has also been a professor at York University and McMaster University. She serves on the board and the Internationalization Committee of the Association of American Universities, and chairs the Association of Universities and Col- leges of Canada’s Standing Advisory Committee on University Research (SACUR). She is a member of the Science, Technology, and Innovation Council (STIC) of Canada, Canada Foundation for Innovation, Trilateral Commission, and is the co-chair of the Private Sector Advisory Committee of the Ontario-Quebec Trade and Co-operation Agreement. She serves on the boards of the Sir Mortimer B. Davis Jewish General Hospital, Trudeau Foundation, Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPPIB), Conférence de Montréal, and the Yellow Media Inc. She is the past president of the Conférence des recteurs et des principaux des universités du Québec (CREPUQ) and was a founding director of the Medical and Related Sci- ences Discovery District (MARS) and Genome Canada, where she also served as vice-chair of the Board. She has served on the boards of the Council of Canadian Academies, the former Medical Research Council of Canada, Neurosciences Canada, Conference Board of Canada, Montreal Chamber of Commerce, Alcan, Canada Forum of Rio Tinto Alcan, Four Seasons Hotel, and Hydro One, among others. Named an Officer of the Order of Canada for her outstanding record of achievements in science, innovation and higher education policy, Professor Munroe-Blum holds numerous honorary degrees from Canadian and international universi- ties and is a Specially Elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. She is a senior fellow of Massey College. In 2008, she was named a Grande Montréalaise, Montréal’s highest honor and in June 2009 was named an officer of the National Order of Quebec. Professor Munroe-Blum holds a Ph.D. with distinction in epidemiology from the University of North

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APPENDIX B 205 Carolina at Chapel Hill, in addition to M.S.W. (Wilfrid Laurier University) and B.A. and B.S.W. degrees (McMaster University). CHERRY MURRAY [NAS/NAE] is dean of Harvard University’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) a position to which she was appointed on July 1, 2009. She also holds the John A. and Elizabeth S. Arm- strong Professorship of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Previously, Dr. Murray served as principal associate director for science and technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, where she led 3,500 employees in providing core science and technology support for Lawrence Livermore’s major programs. Before joining Law- rence Livermore in 2004, Murray had a long and distinguished career at the famed Bell Laboratories, home to creative researchers who went on to win numerous Nobel Prizes, garner tens of thousands of patents, and invent revolutionary technologies such as the laser and the transistor. She joined Bell Labs in 1978 as a staff scientist, marking the beginning of a career that culminated in her position as senior vice president for physi- cal sciences and wireless research. Dr. Murray is the current president of the American Physical Society (APS). She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1999, to the American Academy of Arts and Sci- ences in 2001, and to the National Academy of Engineering in 2002. She has served on more than 80 national and international scientific advisory committees, governing boards, and the visiting committee for Harvard’s Department of Physics (from 1993 to 2004.) Dr. Murray serves as chair of the Division Committee on Engineering and Physical Sciences (DEPS) and is a member of the Committee on International Security and Arms Control and the U.S. National Committee on Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (ex officio). She was previously a member of the Committee on Prospering in the Global Economy of the 21st Century that authored Rising Above the Gathering Storm. HUNTER R. RAWLINGS, a classics scholar, is president of the Asso- ciation of American Universities. He was appointed Cornell University’s 10th president by the Board of Trustees on December 10, 1994. He took office on July 1, 1995, before the start of Cornell’s 130th year, prior to that he was president of the University of Iowa from 1988 to 1995. Dr. Rawlings was a 1966 graduate of Haverford College, with honors in clas- sics, and received his Ph.D. degree from Princeton University in 1970. His scholarly publications include a book, The Structure of Thucydides’ History (Princeton University Press, 1981). A national spokesperson for higher education, he has served as chair of the Ivy Council of Presidents and of the Association of American Universities, and was a member of the American Council on Education board. He is a member of the American

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206 APPENDIX B Academy of Arts and Sciences and serves on the board of managers of his alma mater, Haverford College, and on the National Advisory Com- mittee of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. He also serves on the boards of the National Humanities Center and the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. JOHN S. REED was born in Chicago, but raised in Argentina and Brazil. He graduated from Washington and Jefferson College and the Massachu- setts Institute of Technology in 1961 under a joint degree program earning both a B.A. and a B.S. degree. He served as a Lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers, United States Army, from 1962 to 1964 and then returned to MIT for his M.S. degree. Mr. Reed spent 35 years with Citibank/Citicorp and Citigroup, the last 16 as chairman. He retired in April of 2000. Mr. Reed returned to work as chairman of the New York Stock Exchange from September 2003 until April 2005 and is currently serving as chairman of the Corporation of MIT. Mr. Reed is a Trustee of MDRC, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, and the NBER. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Philosophical Soci- ety. He is the former chairman and chief executive officer of Citicorp and Citibank. After Citicorp merged with the Travelers Group Inc., in 1998, Mr. Reed served as chairman and co-chief executive officer of the new company, Citigroup. He retired in 2000 after 35 years with the company. He served as chairman of the New York Stock Exchange from September 2003 until April 2005 and is currently a member of the MIT Corporation, the Institute’s governing body, and he is on the board of directors at Al- tria. He is chairman and a trustee of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and he is a trustee of MDRC, a nonprofit, nonpartisan social policy research organization. A fellow of both the American Acad- emy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Philosophical Society, Mr. Reed is also a member of The Presidents’ Circle and a former member of the Committee on a Strategic Education Research Plan: Bridging Research and Practice and of the Advisory Board of Issues in Science and Technol- ogy. He earned joint S.B. and B.A. degrees from MIT and Washington and Jefferson College. He received his S.M. from the MIT Sloan School of Management. He also spent two years as an officer in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. TERESA A. SULLIVAN was elected eighth president of the University of Virginia, effective August 1, 2010. Ms. Sullivan is currently provost and executive vice president for Academic Affairs at the University of Michi- gan. She is also Professor of Sociology in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Prior to coming to the University of Michigan, Dr. Sullivan was executive vice chancellor for Academic Affairs for the University of

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APPENDIX B 207 Texas System, a position she held from 2002 until May 2006. In that role, she was the chief academic officer for the nine academic campuses within the University of Texas System. Her responsibilities included develop- ing tuition-setting procedures, initiating and supporting educational and research collaborations among the various campuses, and developing external collaborations. Dr. Sullivan first joined the University of Texas at Austin in 1975 as an instructor and then assistant professor in the Department of Sociology. From 1977 to 1981, she was a faculty member at the University of Chicago. She returned to Texas in 1981 as a faculty member in Sociology. In 1986 she was named to the Law School faculty as well. Dr. Sullivan also held several administrative positions at Texas including: vice president and graduate dean (1995-2002), vice provost (1994-1995), chair of the Department of Sociology (1990-1992), and direc- tor of Women’s Studies (1985-1987). Dr. Sullivan’s research focuses on labor force demography, with particular emphasis on economic margin- ality and consumer debt. The author or co-author of six books and more than 50 scholarly articles, her most recent work explores the question of who files for bankruptcy and why. Ms. Sullivan has served as chair of the U.S. Census Advisory Committee. She is past secretary of the American Sociological Association and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. A graduate of James Madison College at Michigan State University, Dr. Sullivan received her doctoral degree in sociology from the University of Chicago. SIDNEY TAUREL is chairman emeritus of Eli Lilly and Company. Born a Spanish citizen in Casablanca, Morocco, Mr. Taurel became an Ameri- can citizen in November 1995. After graduating from Ecole des Hautes Etudes Commerciales, in Paris, France in 1969, he received a master of business administration degree from Columbia University in 1971. Mr. Taurel joined Eli Lilly and Company in 1971 as an international marketing associate. His 37-year career included 15 years in Brazil, France, Eastern Europe, and the United Kingdom. He became president of Lilly Inter- national in 1986, president of the Pharmaceutical Division in 1993, chief operations officer in 1996, chief executive officer in 1998, and chairman of the board in 1999. He retired as chairman and chief executive officer in 2008. Mr. Taurel is chairman of the Strategic Advisory Committee for Capital Royalty, LLC. He is also a member of the boards of IBM Corpora- tion, McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., and BioCrossroads. He serves on the board of overseers of the Columbia Business School, is a member of the Business Council, and a trustee at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Mr. Taurel is a past president of Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) and a former member of the board of ITT Industries. He received three Presidential appointments: to the Homeland Security

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208 APPENDIX B Advisory Council (2002-2004), the President’s Export Council (2002-2007), and the Advisory Committee for Trade Policy and Negotiations (2007- 2009). He is an officer of the French Legion of Honor. Mr. Taurel is fluent in English, French, Spanish, and Portuguese. LEE T. TODD, JR. became the 11th president of the University of Ken- tucky (UK) on July 1, 2001, a post he continued until his retirement on June 30, 2011. He is a native of Earlington, Kentucky and a graduate of UK and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Todd is the sixth UK alumnus to hold the presidency. He is a former UK engineering profes- sor; a successful businessman who launched two worldwide technology companies, both based in Kentucky; and a public advocate for research, technology, and an entrepreneurial economy in the Commonwealth. Dr. Todd serves as chair of the Advisory Board for the National Science Foun- dation’s Directorate for Education and Human Resources Committee. He is immediate past chair of the Board of Directors for the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities and is presently chair of the APLU Science Math Teacher Imperative. He is president of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) Executive Committee and represents the SEC as a mem- ber of the NCAA Division I Board of Directors as well as on the Bowl Championship Series Committee. Dr. Todd is a member of the Executive Committee of the Business Higher Education Forum. He serves on the Eq- uitable Resources Board of Directors and is chair of the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education’s STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Task Force. He is chair of the National Consortium for Continuous Improvement in Higher Education’s Leveraging Excellence Award selection panel. LAURA D’ANDREA TYSON is the S.K. and Angela Chan Professor of Global Management at the Haas School of Business, at the University of California, Berkeley. She served as dean of London Business School from 2002 to 2006, and as dean of the Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley from 1998 to 2001. Since 2007, Dr. Tyson has served as a senior adviser to the McKinsey Global Institute and the Center for American Progress. She is a member of the Brookings Institution Hamil- ton Project Advisory Council and a member of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Corporation. Dr. Tyson is an advisory board member of Newman’s Own Advisory Board; Generation Investment Management; The Rock Creek Group; and H&Q Asia Pacific. She is a director at LECG (Law and Economics Consulting Group) and she serves on the Board of Directors of Eastman Kodak Company; Morgan Stanley; AT&T, Inc.; the Peter G. Peterson Institute of International Economics; the New America Foundation; and Silver Spring Networks. Dr. Tyson is a member of Presi-

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APPENDIX B 209 dent Obama’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board (PERAB). She served in the Clinton Administration from January 1993 to December 1996. Be- tween March 1995 and December 1996 she served as President Clinton’s National Economic Adviser. Prior to her appointment as National Eco- nomic Adviser, Dr. Tyson served as the sixteenth chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, the first woman to hold that post since the Council’s establishment in 1946. She was responsible for provid- ing the President with advice and analysis on all economic policy matters, for preparing the Administration’s economic forecasts and for the annual Economic Report of the President. In January 2003, the United Kingdom’s Department of Trade and Industry appointed Dr. Tyson chair of a special Task Force on Non-Executive Directors, and in June 2003, The Tyson Report on the Recruitment and Development of Non-Executive Direc- tors was submitted to the United Kingdom government. Dr. Tyson has written opinion columns for many publications including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and the Financial Times. She was a monthly columnist for Business Week between 1998 and 2005 and has made numerous television appearances on economic issues. She is the author of numerous reports, academic papers and books on competitiveness, industrial policy and international trade, including the influential book Who’s Bashing Whom? Trade Conflict in High Technol- ogy Industries. Dr. Tyson has a summa cum laude undergraduate degree from Smith College and a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. PADMASREE WARRIOR is Cisco Systems’ Chief Technology Officer. As CTO, she is responsible for helping drive the company’s technologi- cal innovations and strategy and works closely with its senior executive team and board of directors to align these efforts with Cisco’s corporate goals. Dr. Warrior joined Cisco in 2007. Prior to that, she was the CTO at Motorola, where she led a team of 26,000 engineers and directed Motorola Labs, with an annual R&D budget of $3.7 billion. Over the course of her 23 years at that company, she served in a broad range of roles, including as corporate vice president and general manager of Motorola’s Energy Systems Group, and as corporate vice president and chief technology officer for its Semiconductor Products Sector. Under Dr. Warrior’s lead- ership, Motorola was awarded the 2004 National Medal of Technology by the President of the United States, the first time the company had received this honor. Recently, the Economic Times ranked her as the 11th Most Influential Global Indian, and the United States Pan Asian Ameri- can Chamber of Commerce recognized her with its prestigious Excel- lence Award. Warrior is also a strong and vocal advocate for women and minorities in math, science and engineering. In 2007, she was inducted

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210 APPENDIX B into the Women in Information Technology International Hall of Fame, and received the YWCA Metropolitan Chicago Outstanding Woman of Achievement Award. She has been recognized as a role model by many organizations, including the Girl Scouts Illinois Crossroads Council, Notre Dame Girls High School, the South Asian Women Leadership Forum and as a Science Spectrum Trailblazer. In 2001 she was one of six women na- tionwide selected to receive the “Women Elevating Science and Technol- ogy” award from Working Woman magazine. Dr. Warrior has served on the boards of Chicago’s Joffrey Ballet and Museum of Science and Industry, the Singapore Agency for Science, Technology and Research (ASTAR), the Chicago Mayor’s Technology Council, Cornell University Engineering Council, and advisory council of Indian Institute of Technology. She pre- viously served on the Texas Governor’s Council for Digital Economy, the White House Fellowships Selection Board, and the Technology Advisory Council for the FCC and on the Advisory Committee for the Computing and Information Science and Engineering of the National Science Foun- dation (NSF). Dr. Warrior holds a M.S. degree in chemical engineering from Cornell University and a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in New Delhi, India. In 2007 she was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Engineering from New York’s Polytechnic University.