Appendix E

Committee Biographies

DAN G. BLAZER, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D. (Chair), is the J.P. Gibbons Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and vice chair for Education and Academic Affairs at Duke University Medical Center. Following 9 years in academic administration as chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Dean of Medical Education at Duke University School of Medicine, Dr. Blazer returned to teaching, research, and practice in 1999. In 2002-2003 he was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies of the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. He is the author or editor of 34 books, and author or coauthor of more than 190 published abstracts and over 400 peer-reviewed articles. He is also the author or coauthor of over 180 book chapters. Many of the book chapters and scientific articles are on the topics of depression, epidemiology, and consultation liaison psychiatry, especially with the elderly. Dr. Blazer’s research has focused on the prevalence of physical and mental illness in the elderly. Honors received by Dr. Blazer include a Research Career Development Award from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH); listing in Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in American Men and Women of Science, and The Best Doctors in America; Fellowship in the American College of Psychiatry and Gerontological Society of America (GSA); Distinguished Life Fellowship in the American Psychiatric Association; Distinguished Faculty Member of Duke University School of Medicine; Jack Weinberg Award for research in geriatric psychiatry; Oscar Pfister Award for the integration of religion and psychiatry from the American Psychiatric Association; and the Pioneers in Geriatric Psychiatry Award from the American Association of



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 363
Appendix E Committee Biographies DAN G. BLAZER, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D. (Chair), is the J.P. Gibbons Profes- sor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and vice chair for Education and Academic Affairs at Duke University Medical Center. Following 9 years in academic administration as chair of the Department of Psy - chiatry and Dean of Medical Education at Duke University School of Medicine, Dr. Blazer returned to teaching, research, and practice in 1999. In 2002-2003 he was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies of the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. He is the author or editor of 34 books, and author or coauthor of more than 190 published abstracts and over 400 peer-reviewed articles. He is also the author or coauthor of over 180 book chapters. Many of the book chapters and scientific articles are on the topics of depression, epidemiology, and consultation liaison psychiatry, especially with the elderly. Dr. Blazer’s research has focused on the prevalence of physical and mental illness in the elderly. Honors received by Dr. Blazer include a Research Career Development Award from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH); listing in Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in American Men and Women of Science, and The Best Doctors in America; Fellowship in the American College of Psychiatry and Gerontological Society of America (GSA); Distinguished Life Fellowship in the American Psychiatric Association; Distinguished Faculty Member of Duke University School of Medicine; Jack Weinberg Award for research in geriatric psychiatry; Oscar Pfister Award for the integration of religion and psychiatry from the American Psychiatric Association; and the Pio - neers in Geriatric Psychiatry Award from the American Association of 363

OCR for page 363
364 MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USE WORKFORCE FOR OLDER ADULTS Geriatric Psychiatry. Dr. Blazer is past president of the American Associa- tion of Geriatric Psychiatry and the American Geriatric Society, and past chair of the membership committee of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He is currently the editor of Duke Medicine HealthNews and a member of the editorial board of the Archives of General Psychiatry. Dr. Blazer was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1995. MARGARITA ALEGRÍA, Ph.D., is director of the Center for Multicul- tural Mental Health Research and a professor of psychology in the Depart- ment of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Alegría researches mental health services for Latinos and other ethnic populations. She is currently the principal investigator of the Advanced Center for Mental Health Disparities, and the Latino arm of the National Latino and Asian American Study, as well as the co–principal investigator of the CHA- UPR Excellence in Partnerships for Community Outreach, Research on Health Disparities and Training (EXPORT) Center. Her published works focus on mental health services research, conceptual and methodological issues with minority populations, risk behaviors, and disparities in service delivery. Dr. Alegría received her Ph.D. from Temple University and was elected to the IOM in 2011. MARÍA P. ARANDA, Ph.D., L.C.S.W., is an associate professor at the University of Southern California (USC) School of Social Work. She joined the faculty in 1995 and holds a joint appointment with the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology. She chairs the Scientific Governing Board of the Edward J. Roybal Institute on Aging and the Older Adult Sub - concentration, both at USC. Dr. Aranda’s research and teaching interests address the interplays among chronic medical conditions, psychiatric disorders, and sociocultural diversity among people from low-income, minority populations. Dr. Aranda has served as principal investigator or co-investigator on several key studies funded by and/or in collaboration with the National Institute of Mental Health, National Cancer Institute, the John A. Hartford Foundation/Gerontological Society of America, National Institute of Rehabilitation and Research, Los Angeles Basin Clin- ical and Translational Science Institute, Alzheimer’s Association/Health Resources and Services Administration, Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, Larson Endowment for Innovative Research and Teach- ing, and AltaMed Health Services Corp. She has experience in the eth - nographic study of adherence factors in clinical trials as well as clinical and epidemiological research examining the relationships among health, stress, psychosocial resources, and mental health and service use out- comes. Dr. Aranda has worked specifically on problem-solving therapy with elderly and middle-aged minorities and its efficacy as treatment for

OCR for page 363
365 APPENDIX E depression in community-based settings. Overall, Dr. Aranda’s interests address mental health intervention and services research for underrep- resented populations, psychosocial care of late-life psychiatric disorders, sociocultural adaptations to evidence-based mental health care, and train- ing of interventionists in evidence-based practice. STEPHEN BARTELS, M.D., M.S., is the Herman O. West Professor of Geriatrics and Professor of Psychiatry, professor of Community & Family Medicine at Dartmouth Medical School, and professor of Health Policy at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice. He is director of the Dartmouth Centers for Health and Aging, where he oversees the Dartmouth Center for Aging Research, the Northern New England Geriatric Education Center, and the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Aging Resource Center. His research interests include health care manage- ment and rehabilitation for older persons with serious mental disorders, health promotion, integration of mental health and primary care, self- management, applied use of health management technology, Medicaid and Medicare costs of medical and mental disorders in older adults, shared decision making, community-based implementation research, and evidence-based geriatric psychiatry. He has published more than 130 peer- reviewed articles and book chapters and has served in national leader- ship roles in the field of geriatrics. He is a past president of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry and founding chair of the Geriatric Mental Health Foundation. Dr. Bartels served as the expert consultant and author for the Older Adult Subcommittee Report for the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health. He has also testified before Congress and has participated in congressional briefings on aging and health policy and on funding for research on mental disorders in older persons. Dr. Bartels is the recipient of a 5-year research mentoring award from the National Institutes of Health and is the principal investigator for a multisite, postdoctoral training program in geriatric mental health ser- vices research. He also serves on the Executive Committee and faculty for the NIMH-sponsored Summer Research Institute and Advanced Research Institute in Geriatric Psychiatry. He has numerous research and training grants, including funding from NIMH, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Health Resources and Services Administration, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and foundation support, and served on the NIMH Interventions Review Committee from 2003 to 2009. He was the lead expert and author for the SAMHSA Action Plan for Behavioral Health Workforce Development for Older Adult Mental Health Services. He also served as the scien - tific co-director for SAMHSA’s Older Americans Substance Abuse and Mental Health Technical Assistance Center and is currently the scientific

OCR for page 363
366 MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USE WORKFORCE FOR OLDER ADULTS lead for SAMHSA’s National Technical Assistance Center for the Older Adult Targeted Capacity Grant Program for Evidence-Based Practice Implementation. He was selected for the Health Services Research Senior Career Award by the American Psychiatric Association in 2003, the Mental Health and Aging Award by the American Society on Aging in 2005, and the Riverbend Rainbow Award and the Outstanding Psychiatrist Award from the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill of New Hampshire in 2010. CHRISTINE E. BISHOP, Ph.D., is the Atran Professor of Labor Econom- ics at the Heller School of Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. She is a health economist who applies microeconomics to policy-related problems in health services supply, demand, and financing. Her studies in long-term services and supports (LTSS) have addressed provider and recipient behavior, considering costs, production efficiency, payment, financing, and use of nursing homes and home health services. Her current research on the LTSS workforce builds on her training as a labor economist and previous research on nursing labor markets. Because population health and disability are at the root of demand for LTSS, and because preventive interventions may save future health and LTSS costs, Dr. Bishop has undertaken investigations of the role of access to pre- scription drugs in affecting need for health services and thus trends in disability in the elderly. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University. FREDERIC C. BLOW, Ph.D., is professor and director of the Mental Health Services Outcomes and Translation Section in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Michigan Medical School, and director of the National Serious Mental Illness Treatment Resource and Evaluation Center for the Department of Veterans Affairs, Ann Arbor, Michigan. His areas of research expertise include alcohol screening and diagnosis for older adults, serious mental illness and concurrent substance abuse, alco - hol brief interventions in health care settings, and geriatric mental health services research. He is a national expert in mental health and substance abuse services research and policy, with a focus on evidence-based prac- tices. Dr. Blow has been the principal investigator on numerous federal, state, and foundation grants, and has published extensively in the areas of substance abuse and alcoholism among the elderly, substance abuse screening/treatment, and mental health. From 1996 to 1998, Dr. Blow was panel chair for the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment’s Treat- ment Improvement Protocol on Substance Abuse Among Older Adults. Additionally, he is the first Huss/Hazelden Research Chair for the Butler Center for Research at the Hazelden Center in Center City, Minnesota. Dr. Blow maintains an active role in both graduate and undergraduate

OCR for page 363
367 APPENDIX E teaching and the mentoring of pre- and postdoctoral students and junior faculty. KATHLEEN C. BUCKWALTER, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, is codirector of the National Health Law and Policy Resource Center, University of Iowa Col- lege of Law and formerly Sally Mathis Hartwig Professor of Gerontologi - cal Nursing Research. She served as associate provost for Health Sciences at the University of Iowa from 1997 to 2004; and director of the John A. Hartford Center for Geriatric Nursing Excellence from 2005 to 2011; and deputy director of the University’s Center on Aging. She held secondary appointments in the College of Medicine Departments of Psychiatry and Internal Medicine, College of Public Health, and College of Law at the University of Iowa. Dr. Buckwalter is recognized for her research in psy - chiatric nursing, aging, and long-term care, and has a sustained record of private and federal support related to the evaluation of clinical nursing interventions for geropsychiatric populations. Her particular interest is in behavioral management strategies for rural caregivers of persons with dementia and the effectiveness of community programs to prevent, mini- mize, and treat psychiatric problems in the rural elderly. With support from the NIMH and Administration on Aging, Dr. Buckwalter headed the Mental Health of the Rural Elderly Outreach Project and served as prin - cipal investigator of the Progressively Lowered Stress Threshold (PLST) Model: Effectiveness for Rural Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders (ADRD) Caregivers funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). She was the first recipient of the National Gerontological Nurs- ing Association Board of Directors Award, and in 2007 she received New York University College of Nursing’s Distinguished Scholar in Nursing Award. She was honored by the Iowa Association of Homes and Services for Aging Advocacy Award and the Gerontological Society of America Distinguished Mentorship in Gerontology Award. In 2010 she received the American Psychiatric Nurses Association Psychiatric Nurse of the Year award, the GSA Doris Schwartz Gerontological Nursing Research award, and the Iowa Department on Aging Lifetime Achievement award. Dr. Buckwalter serves on numerous review committees, editorial boards, and advisory groups. She has authored more than 250 articles, more than 85 book chapters, 8 health policy and commission papers, more than 50 monographs/videos/media, and more than 90 editorials/reviews/com - mentaries. In addition, she has edited eight books on topics such as geri- atric mental health, memory, aging, and dementia. CHRISTOPHER M. CALLAHAN, M.D., is the Indiana University Cor- nelius and Yvonne Pettinga Professor of Medicine. His research, educa- tion, and clinical interests are in primary care geriatrics. He is a research

OCR for page 363
368 MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USE WORKFORCE FOR OLDER ADULTS scientist in the Regenstrief Institute and the founding director of the Indiana University Center for Aging Research. In 1999-2000 he was a visiting scholar in the History and Psychopathology Research Program in the Department of Psychiatry at Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. Dr. Callahan has received a Paul B. Beeson Physician Faculty Scholar in Aging Award from the American Federation for Aging Research and a Midcareer Mentorship Award from the National Institute on Aging. He is the Principal Investigator of the Indiana University Roybal Center. His research has also been supported by the John A. Hartford Foundation and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. He also received the Teaching Excellence Recognition Award at Indiana University and the Tony and Mary Hulman Health Achievement Award for Excellence in Health Sciences Research. Dr. Callahan’s research focuses on strategies to improve the care of older adults in primary care. This research explores systems-level interventions to enable primary care physicians to deliver excellent care to older adults. His specific research interests include the recognition and treatment of late-life depression and the care of older adults with dementia. Dr. Callahan graduated from St. Louis University School of Medicine in 1985. He completed his internal medicine residency at Baylor College of Medicine in 1988 and completed a fellowship in health services research at Indiana University School of Medicine in 1991. He has a Certificate of Added Qualifications in Geriatric Medicine. ANNI CHUNG, M.S.W., has been the president and CEO of Self-Help for the Elderly (SHE) since 1981. She completed the Leadership America Pro- gram in 2007. In 1997, she graduated from the Gallup Leadership Institute and was a National Fellow with the Asian Pacific American Women Lead- ership Institute. She oversees and manages a community-based organiza - tion that provides a comprehensive range of health, educational, social, and recreational services to more than 35,000 seniors a year. SHE employs over 500 staff with an annual budget of approximately $18 million, serving seniors in San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, and Alameda counties. Ms. Chung is currently on the Board of Directors of St. Mary’s Medical Center and the No Health Without Mental Health Foundation. She was on the San Francisco Alzheimer’s Task Force, a group charged by Mayor Newsom to develop a long-range plan for San Francisco’s aging popula- tion. She is a member of the University of California Community Part - nership Council and also serves on the American Diabetes Association’s Asian and Pacific American Diabetes Action Council. Since 1998, she has been a member of AT&T’s Community Partnership Agreement Com- mittee and Verizon’s Community Citizen’s Collaborative, which make technology grants to community groups. She was chair of San Francisco’s Digital Inclusion Task Force from 2006 to 2008. In addition to her commu-

OCR for page 363
369 APPENDIX E nity involvement, she is the producer and host of a weekly public affairs program called Chinese Journal for KTSF-TV 26. She graduated from the School of Social Work at San Francisco State University. GARY L. GOTTLIEB, M.D., M.B.A., is the president and CEO of Partners HealthCare. He is a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and was appointed to the IOM in 2010. He has served as president of Brigham and Women’s/Faulkner Hospitals; as president of North Shore Medical Center; and as chair of Partners Psychiatry. Before moving to Boston, he spent 15 years in Philadelphia. He arrived at the University of Pennsylvania as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar. He later established Penn Medical Center’s first program in geriatric psy- chiatry and he rose to become executive vice chair and interim chair of Penn’s Department of Psychiatry and the Health System’s associate dean for managed care. He went on to become director and CEO of Friends Hospital in Philadelphia. He has published in geriatric psychiatry and health care policy. He is a past president of the American Association of Geriatric Psychiatry. He received his B.S. cum laude from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and his M.D. from the Albany Medical College of Union University in a 6-year accelerated biomedical program. He com- pleted his internship and residency and served as chief resident at New York University/Bellevue Medical Center. Dr. Gottlieb currently serves as chair of the Private Industry Council, the city’s workforce develop- ment board. He is also a member of the Boards of Directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and Partners in Health. MICHAEL A. HOGE, Ph.D., is a professor and director of Clinical Train- ing in Psychology within the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale Uni- versity School of Medicine. He also serves as Director of Yale Behavioral Health, which provides a broad array of mental health and addiction services to adolescents and adults. He is a founding member of the Annapolis Coalition on the Behavioral Health Workforce, which initiated a national, interprofessional effort to improve the recruitment, retention, and training of individuals who provide prevention and treatment ser- vices for persons with mental illnesses and substance use disorders. Dr. Hoge serves as the senior science and policy advisor for the Coalition and was the senior editor of the national Action Plan on Behavioral Health Workforce Development which was commissioned by SAMHSA. He is also the senior editor of the Alaskan Core Competencies for Direct Care Workers in Health and Human Services, which details essential cross-sector skills for frontline staff. He has consulted on behavioral health workforce issues to the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, the IOM, and many states and organizations. He now directs the Yale Group on

OCR for page 363
370 MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USE WORKFORCE FOR OLDER ADULTS Workforce Development and the Yale Program on Supervision, and is chair of the Connecticut Workforce Collaborative on Behavioral Health. Dr. Hoge is the past chair of the Behavioral Health Professional and Tech- nical Advisory Committee of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) and a recipient of the Moffic Award for Ethical Practice in Public Sector Managed Behavioral Healthcare. He received his doctorate from Kent State University. OCTAVIO N. MARTINEZ, M.D., M.P.H., M.B.A., is the fifth executive director and the first Hispanic to lead the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health since it was created in 1940. The foundation’s grants and programs support mental health services, research, policy analysis, and public edu- cation projects in Texas. As CEO, he oversees the vision, mission, goals, strategic planning, and day-to-day operations of the Foundation. He is a clinical professor with an appointment at the University of Texas at Aus- tin in the School of Social Work. His academic interests include minority health, health disparities, and workforce issues. Prior to joining the Foun - dation, Dr. Martinez was a clinical psychiatrist at the Albemarle Mental Health Center and an affiliate associate professor at the Brody School of Medicine in North Carolina. He was part of a team that created a 23-Hour Crisis Unit at Albemarle Hospital in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, to serve a 10-county catchment area. Before that he was an assistant profes - sor and psychiatrist at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) and a faculty associate with the Center for Medi- cal Humanities and Ethics. In San Antonio he served as director of Psy - chiatric Consultation/Liaison Services for two major teaching hospitals and codirector of behavioral sciences for the UTHSCSA medical school. He developed two community psychiatric clinics for underserved areas of San Antonio. He is a Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and a member of the Texas Society for Psychiatric Physicians, American College of Mental Health Administration, National Hispanic Medical Association, and Harvard Faculty Club. From 2002 to 2006, he served as a Special Emphasis Panel Member for the National Institutes of Health, National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities. He is also a recipient of the Adolph Meyer, M.D., Research Award in recognition of contributions in minority health and efforts to improve the mental health of all citizens regardless of socioeconomic status. Dr. Martinez is licensed to practice medicine in Texas and North Carolina and is a diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. He has bachelor’s and mas- ter’s degrees in business administration with a concentration in finance from the University of Texas at Austin, an M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health, and an M.D. from Baylor College of Medicine. He also

OCR for page 363
371 APPENDIX E completed The Commonwealth Fund/Harvard University Fellowship in Minority Health Policy at Harvard Medical School. WILLARD MAYS, M.A., has extensive experience at the state (Indiana) and national levels in aging, health, mental health, and substance use with a specialty in older adult public policy. He is past chair of the National Coalition on Mental Health and Aging, which includes more than 80 fed - eral agencies, national organizations, and state and local mental health and aging coalitions. He currently chairs the Indiana Mental Health and Aging Coalition. He is past chair of the Older Persons Division of the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors, and was founding president of the National Association of PASRR Professionals. He is chair of the Mental Health and Aging Network of the American Society on Aging (ASA) and was recipient of the 2005 ASA Mental Health and Aging Award. He gave invited testimony to the President’s New Free- dom Commission on Mental Health and was a congressionally appointed Delegate to the 2005 White House Conference on Aging. He was coeditor and coauthor of the SAMHSA publication “Community Integration for Older Adults with Mental Illnesses: Overcoming Barriers and Seizing Opportunities.” He is a consultant for the Centers for Medicare & Med - icaid PASRR Technical Assistance Center and the SAMHSA Older Adult Mental Health Targeted Capacity Expansion Grant Technical Assistance Center. In 2012 he played a lead role in forming the Aging and Mental Health Advocacy Network to coordinate advocacy efforts for older adult mental health and addiction. PETER V. RABINS, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor and the Richman Family Professor for Alzheimer’s and Related Disease in the Department of Psy - chiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is also the director, Division of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neuropsychiatry. Dr. Rabins has joint appointments in the Department of Medicine and the departments of health policy & management and men - tal health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Rabins has focused his career on the study of psychiatric disorders in the elderly. His current research focuses on the measurement of quality of life in persons with Alzheimer’s disease, the care of patients with late-stage dementia, autism in the elderly, and phenotypic variation in frontotem - poral dementia. Because diseases and disabilities that are prevalent in the elderly commonly cross traditional disciplinary and training boundaries, Dr. Rabins has championed the use of care providers with differing train- ing backgrounds as a necessary component of care for the elderly.

OCR for page 363
372 MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USE WORKFORCE FOR OLDER ADULTS MARK SNOWDEN, M.D., M.P.H., is an associate professor in the Uni- versity of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He is medical director for geriatric psychiatry services at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. In this capacity he provides and supervises geriatric psychiatry services to several community-based nurs - ing homes and clinics, as well as inpatient treatment and consultations at Harborview Medical Center. He supervises clinical training for geriatric psychiatry fellows and general psychiatry residents who work with him in his clinic service in the nursing home and geriatric medicine primary care clinics. His research focuses on delivery of evidence-based mental health services to community-dwelling older adults and nursing home residents. He has led several expert panels in the review of the literature and in formulating recommendations for the dissemination of evidence- based practices for depression and other mental health conditions. He has received funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, NIMH, and CDC. He received his M.D. from the University of Washington, where he also completed psychiatric residency training and the geriatric psychiatry fellowship. He worked as a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar from 1994 to 1996. During that time he received an M.P.H. from the University of Washington School of Public Health. ROBYN STONE, Dr.PH., is executive director of the LeadingAge Center for Applied Research (formerly the Institute for the Future of Aging Ser- vices) and senior vice president for research at LeadingAge (formerly the American Association of Homes and Services for the Aging). The center is an applied research organization dedicated to bridging the worlds of policy, practice, and research to advance the development and diffusion of high-quality aging and long-term care services and supports. Prior to joining LeadingAge, Dr. Stone was executive director and chief operat - ing officer of the International Longevity Center–USA in New York City. She has also worked for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Policy and served the White House as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Disability, Aging, and Long-Term Care Policy and as Assistant Secretary for Aging in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in the Clinton Administration. She is an internationally recognized expert in long-term care and aging services policy and has published extensively in the areas of quality, workforce development, financing, and organization of long- term care and senior housing with services. Dr. Stone holds a doctorate in public health from the University of California, Berkeley.