• National HIV Surveillance System
  • Medical Monitoring Project
  • Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program
  • Medicaid and Medicare
  • Veterans Health Administration
  • Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS
  • North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design
  • CFAR Network of Integrated Clinical Systems
  • HIV Research Network
  • Private insurers

As the committee concluded in its first report with respect to the estimation of its recommended indicators for clinical HIV care and supportive services, combining data from multiple data systems presents a range of analytic and logistical challenges that will change over time and need to be revaluated periodically. To that end, the committee reiterates its recommendation from the first report pertaining to periodic reevaluation of mechanisms for combining relevant data elements and identification of and approaches to addressing barriers to the efficient analysis of data, including relevant statistical methodologies (IOM, 2012, p. 315).

Question (c) from the committee’s statement of task asks about how to regularly obtain data from a nationally representative sample of people with HIV to monitor the impact of the ACA on health care coverage and utilization after 2014. The committee saw this as an opportunity to recommend a dynamic strategy for capturing data from a nationally representative sample of people with diagnosed HIV. Given the challenges discussed in the committee’s first report of collecting and combining data from disparate systems to generate an overall picture of the care experiences of people with HIV in the United States (IOM, 2012, Chapters 4-6), development of a unique mechanism for capturing relevant information would simplify the collection and analysis of data and provide more detailed and representative data than currently exist to monitor the impact of the ACA on health care coverage and utilization for people with HIV.

After reviewing multiple data systems, the committee concluded that the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) is a promising resource for the generation of nationally representative estimates of health care coverage and utilization for people with diagnosed HIV. Since people with HIV comprise less than 1 percent of the U.S. population, it is unlikely that national population-based health surveys will include a sufficient sample of people with HIV to generate nationally representative data on the care experiences of this population. In contrast, MMP focuses specifically on people with HIV. MMP was designed by the Centers for Disease Control



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