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Biographical Sketches of Moderators and Speakers

GINA ADAMS, M.A., is a Senior Fellow at the Urban Institute focusing on policies and programs affecting the affordability, quality, and supply of child care and early care and education, and the ability of low-income and at-risk families to use these services. Her interests include efforts to integrate work benefit systems with the Child Care and Development Fund, child care and family stability patterns, contextual factors affecting the quality of child care providers, barriers to prekindergarten for non-Latino-immigrant and English-language-learner families, child care providers and the subsidy system, policies to support access to and retention of subsidies for low-income families, and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families–child care interconnections. She has worked on numerous other projects, including the National Head Start Impact Study, an evaluation of the Enhanced Home Visiting Project of Early Head Start, and analyses of child care data from the National Survey of America’s Families. Earlier positions include Assistant Director of the Child Care and Development Division at the Children’s Defense Fund, policy analyst at the Congressional Budget Office, and working directly with low-income children and families. She has an M.A. in public policy from Duke University.

SARA BENJAMIN NEELON, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Community and Family Medicine at Duke University Medical Center, with secondary appointments in Global Health and Pediatrics. She is also a Faculty Fellow in the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University and a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Centre for



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B Biographical Sketches of Moderators and Speakers GINA ADAMS, M.A., is a Senior Fellow at the Urban Institute focusing on policies and programs affecting the affordability, quality, and supply of child care and early care and education, and the ability of low-income and at-risk families to use these services. Her interests include efforts to integrate work benefit systems with the Child Care and Development Fund, child care and family stability patterns, contextual factors affecting the quality of child care providers, barriers to prekindergarten for non-Latino- immigrant and English-language-learner families, child care providers and the subsidy system, policies to support access to and retention of subsidies for low-income families, and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families– child care interconnections. She has worked on numerous other projects, including the National Head Start Impact Study, an evaluation of the En- hanced Home Visiting Project of Early Head Start, and analyses of child care data from the National Survey of America’s Families. Earlier positions include Assistant Director of the Child Care and Development Division at the Children’s Defense Fund, policy analyst at the Congressional Budget Office, and working directly with low-income children and families. She has an M.A. in public policy from Duke University. SARA BENJAMIN NEELON, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D., is an Assistant Profes- sor in the Department of Community and Family Medicine at Duke Uni- versity Medical Center, with secondary appointments in Global Health and Pediatrics. She is also a Faculty Fellow in the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University and a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Centre for 83

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84 RESEARCH METHODS TO ASSESS DIETARY INTAKE Diet and Activity Research at the University of Cambridge in England. Her research interests include nutrition and physical activity as they relate to obesity prevention in young children. Her current research focuses on envi- ronmental- and policy-based approaches to obesity prevention in a number of settings where young children spend time. In addition to a number of domestic studies, she is engaged in observational and intervention research on childhood obesity in Mexico and England. She is also in the process of developing a fruit- and vegetable-garden-based intervention study in Kenya. She completed her doctoral degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and postdoctoral training at Harvard Medical School. A. RUPA DATTA, Ph.D., is a Vice President and Senior Fellow at NORC at the University of Chicago. For nearly 20 years, Datta has held leadership roles on a wide variety of projects, such as the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE), the Census Integrated Communications Program Evaluation, the Qatar National Education Data Systems project, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) cohort. Datta is currently Project Director for the NSECE, a multimode survey that employs both address-based sampling and a sampling frame built from administrative data; earlier, she served as Project Director for its design phase. The NSECE samples 100,000 households and 30,000 providers of various types for five different questionnaire and sample types. Datta has also served as Deputy Project Director on the 2010 Census Integrated Com- munications Program Evaluation, the official federal evaluation of the com- munication and partnership efforts to improve cooperation with the 2010 Decennial Census. Datta’s longest-running contribution to human capital research is through the NLSY97 cohort, a 9,000-person annual survey of school-to-work transition sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor. Since 1999, she has served as Project Director, Acting Principal Investigator, and Co-Principal Investigator of NLSY97. BETH DIXON, Ph.D., M.P.H., is an Associate Professor of Public Health Nutrition in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health at New York University (NYU). As a nutritional epidemiologist, Dr. Dixon studies the dietary patterns and health of different populations, including children and immigrants. Her research studies involve the use of quantita- tive methods to assess diet in relation to chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease, cancer, and osteoporosis. She also evaluates health and nutrition policy, especially to improve maternal and child nutrition. She completed two Robert Wood Johnson Foundation grants to evaluate the nutrition and physical activity policies of New York City (NYC) child care centers in an effort to reduce obesity and improve the lifestyles of young children and is currently working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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85 APPENDIX B (CDC), NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and ICF Macro to conduct a similar evaluation in a larger sample of centers. She is also working with colleagues to evaluate the NYC calorie-labeling policy in fast food restaurants, tax incentives for introducing supermarkets in high-need areas, and school food policies in relation to child obesity, and is part of the CDC-funded Nutrition and Obesity Prevention Policy Research and Evaluation Network. At NYU, Dr. Dixon directs the MPH public health nutrition concentration. At the national level, she is a past chair of the Food and Nutrition Section of American Public Health Association and a past chair of the Association of Graduate Programs in Public Health Nutrition. MARY KAY FOX, M.Ed., is Senior Fellow and area leader for nutrition policy research at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Ms. Fox has more than 25 years of research experience with child nutrition and food assis- tance programs. She has conducted research on the adequacy and quality of diets consumed by children from birth through adolescence, and has examined the contributions of school- and child care–based meal programs to children’s dietary intakes and obesity risk. Ms. Fox led the nutrition components of two comprehensive national studies of the Child and Adult Care Food Program and served as a Co-Principal Investigator on the 2002 and 2008 Feeding Infants and Toddlers Studies. She also assessed the implementation of an obesity prevention initiative in Head Start centers, including assessments of the types and quality of foods offered and op- portunities for physical activity. Currently, Ms. Fox is directing the fourth School Nutrition Dietary Assessment study. This study, which included a nationally representative sample of almost 900 schools, will provide a comprehensive picture of the nutritional quality of the meals offered and served in the nation’s schools as well as schools’ food and physical activity environments. Ms. Fox served on the Institute of Medicine Committee to Review Child and Adult Care Food Program Meal Requirements, as well as the Committee on Nutrition Standards for the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs. Ms. Fox has a B.S. in nutrition and dietetics from Mundelein College of Loyola University and an M.Ed. in nutrition from Tufts University. FREDERIC GLANTZ, Ph.D., is president of Kokopelli Associates LLC, a social policy research firm located in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Prior to form- ing his own firm in 2006, he was a Vice President and Principal Associate at Abt Associates. He has been involved in numerous child care studies dating back to the 1974–1979 National Day Care Study and the 1976–1980 Na- tional Family Day Care Home Study. He also directed the 1980 National Child Care Survey. Dr. Glantz directed the three National Studies of CACFP and participated in the Assessment of the Effects of Tiering on CACFP. He

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86 RESEARCH METHODS TO ASSESS DIETARY INTAKE is currently the Principal Investigator on the ongoing Program Assessment of CACFP Sponsor Tiering Determinations. JAY HIRSCHMAN, M.P.H., C.N.S., has worked in public health nutrition at the local, state, and federal levels, including 25 years at the U.S. Depart- ment of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service. He served as a State Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Supervisor and as the first Director for the Nutrition Policy and Analysis Staff at the then–newly formed USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. In his current position of Staff Director, he is responsible for managing the staff conducting the evaluation studies and policy analysis for all domestic Special Nutrition Programs, including WIC, the National School Lunch Program, the School Breakfast Program, CACFP and the other Child Nutrition Programs, and the Food Distribution Programs. Mr. Hirschman is an American College of Nutrition board-certified nutrition specialist and served as elected chair of the American Public Health Asso- ciation Food and Nutrition Section (APHA/FN) in 2003–2004. In 2009 he received the APHA/FN Mary C. Egan award, which “goes to those public health nutritionists who pioneer fresh approaches to public health nutri- tion, nutrition education, and those groups with special dietary needs.” SUSAN JEKIELEK, Ph.D., is a Researcher in the Division of Child and Family Development of the Office of Planning, Research, and Evalua- tion in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). In this role, Dr. Jekielek oversees numerous research grants examining child care issues in low-income families and develops funding priorities for research that can inform ACF programs. She collaborates across agencies on multiple projects, including the Interagency Forum for Child and Family Statistics America’s Children report. In addition, she reviews survey measures, instru- ments, and research designs related to child care and other federal programs (e.g., the National Child Care Supply and Demand Study and the Support- ing Healthy Marriage Intervention). Dr. Jekielek’s own research addresses issues related to family structure and child development, indicators of child well-being, work-family issues, and the measurement of family processes and child well-being in large national data sets. SUZANNE P. MURPHY, Ph.D., R.D., is Professor Emeritus at the Cancer Research Center of Hawaii at the University of Hawaii, Honolulu. Previ- ously, Dr. Murphy was State Director of the California Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program at the University of California, Davis. Dr. Murphy’s research interests include dietary assessment methodology, de- velopment of food and supplement composition databases, and nutritional epidemiology of chronic diseases (with emphasis on cancer and obesity).

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87 APPENDIX B Dr. Murphy has served as a member of the National Nutrition Monitoring Advisory Council and the year 2000 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Com- mittee. Currently, she serves on editorial boards for the Journal of Food Composition and Analysis and Nutrition Today and serves as contribut- ing editor for Nutrition Reviews. Dr. Murphy has served on several IOM panels, including the Subcommittee on Interpretation and Uses of Dietary Reference Intakes (as chair, then member), the Subcommittee on Upper Safe Reference Levels of Nutrients (as member), and the Panel on Calcium and Related Nutrients (as member). She chaired the Committee to Review the WIC Food Packages and the Committee to Review Child and Adult Care Food Program Meal Requirements and is a former member of the Food and Nutrition Board. Dr. Murphy earned an M.S. in molecular biology from San Francisco State University and a Ph.D. in nutrition from the University of California, Berkeley. ANGELA M. ODOMS-YOUNG, M.S., Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in kinesiology and nutrition in the College of Applied Health Sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Prior to her current position, she served on the faculty at Northern Illinois University in Public Health and Health Education. Dr. Odoms-Young’s research is focused on understanding social, cultural, and environmental determinants of dietary behaviors and diet-re- lated diseases in low-income and minority populations. Her current projects include studies to evaluate the impact of the new WIC food package on dietary intake, weight status, and chronic disease risk in 2- to 3-year-old low-income children; examine relationships between neighborhood food availability, eating behaviors, and weight status in Latino families; and un- derstand the influence of marketing on food consumption in African Ameri- can families. Dr. Odoms-Young completed a Family Research Consortium Postdoctoral Fellowship examining family processes in diverse populations at the Pennsylvania State University and University of Illinois at Urbana and a Community Health Scholars Fellowship in community-based participa- tory research at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Dr. Odoms-Young earned a B.S. in food and nutrition from the University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign and an M.S. and a Ph.D. from Cornell Univer- sity in human nutrition and community nutrition, respectively. LYNNE OUDEKERK, M.A., R.D., C.D.N., is recently retired as Acting Director of CACFP at the New York State Department of Health. Ms. Oudekerk served as Principal Investigator for USDA-funded Team Nutri- tion Training Grants that provide funding for innovative obesity preven- tion programming for youth attending child care centers and organized after-school programs. She also served as a member of the IOM Committee on Obesity Prevention Policies for Young Children. As part of her former

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88 RESEARCH METHODS TO ASSESS DIETARY INTAKE position, Ms. Oudekerk directed the New York Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education–funded Eat Well Play Hard in Child Care Settings (EWPHCCS) initiative. EWPHCCS provides funding to govern- ment and nonprofit agencies in the state to implement nutrition education and physical activity interventions in low-income child care centers. The intervention targets preschool children, their families, and their caregivers with obesity prevention messages. She oversaw program evaluation activi- ties for CACFP obesity prevention projects by collecting, analyzing, and disseminating data and reports on the success of nutrition and physical activity interventions on the rates of obesity in New York communities. She also directed outreach activities designed to increase participation of underserved day care centers and family day care homes. She received a B.S. in nutritional science from Cornell University and an M.A. in human nutrition from Syracuse University. LORRENE RITCHIE, Ph.D., R.D., is Director of Research at the Univer- sity of California, Berkeley, Atkins Center for Weight and Health, where she has conducted research on child nutrition and child obesity prevention for over a decade. Current research projects include evaluation of nutrition environments in child care in California; dietary patterns, timing of eating, and sleep duration in relation to obesity development in adolescent girls; changes in dietary behaviors and satisfaction among WIC participants in response to food package changes; the impact of the Fresh Fruit and Veg- etable Program on the dietary intakes of elementary school students; the impact of the Network for a Healthy California’s Power Play! program on students’ intake of fruits and vegetable and physical activity level; the relationship of community programs and policies on child nutrition and weight status; and WIC infant and toddler feeding practices and weight. MONICA ROHACEK, M.P.P., is a Research Associate in the Urban Insti- tute’s Center on Labor, Human Services, and Population. Her main areas of interest include the supply, demand, and costs of early care and education, workforce issues, the child care subsidy system, supports for child care providers, and the evaluation of related public policies. Ms. Rohacek has extensive experience with all aspects of quantitative and qualitative field research, including instrument design, sampling and sample recruitment, data collection through interviews and focus groups, qualitative and quan- titative data management and analysis, and reporting research findings. Past fieldwork included projects involving focus groups with low-income mothers on the topic of maternal depression, in-depth interviews with child care center directors about factors supporting and inhibiting the production of good quality care, telephone interviews with parents receiving child care subsidies, individual interviews with child care subsidy administrators and

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89 APPENDIX B case workers, and focus groups with child care providers. Ms. Rohacek received her degree from the University of California, Berkeley. CHARLENE RUSSELL-TUCKER, M.S.M., R.D., is Associate Commis- sioner for the Connecticut State Department of Education. In this role she is responsible for the administration of the Division of Family and Student Support Services, which comprises three bureaus: the Bureau of Choice Programs; the Bureau of Health/Nutrition, Family Services and Adult Edu- cation; and the Bureau of Special Education. She provides leadership and support in developing and implementing effective family and student sup- port programs and services to assist schools and other educational partners in improving student performance. Prior to her appointment as Associate Commissioner, Ms. Russell-Tucker was Chief of the Bureau of Health and Nutrition Services and Child/Family/School Partnerships at the Connecticut State Department of Education. The Bureau was strategically positioned within the department to support the social, emotional, physical, and mental health of students and families in order to achieve success in school and in life. Its initiatives and services include School-Family-Community Partnerships, Child Nutrition Programs, School Health Promotion/Mental Health Services/School Nurses, Nutrition Education, the Safe and Drug Free Schools Program, 21st Century Community Learning Centers/After- School programs, Family Resource Centers, the Young Parents Program, and Education of Homeless Children and Youth. Ms. Russell-Tucker is past president of the Connecticut Dietetic Association and of the CACFP National Professional Association. She is also an adjunct faculty member at a local college where she teaches business management courses in the program for nontraditional students. She received her master of science in management from Albertus Magnus College–New Dimensions in New Haven, Connecticut, and is a registered dietitian. VIRGINIA A. STALLINGS, M.D., is a Professor of Pediatrics at the Univer- sity of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Director of the Nutrition Center at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and holds the Jean A. Cortner Chair in Gastroenterology and Nutrition. She is a pediatrician and a spe- cialist in nutrition and growth in children with chronic illness. Her research interests are in areas of nutrition-related growth and body composition in healthy children and those with chronic disease (including obesity, sickle cell disease, osteoporosis, cystic fibrosis, cerebral palsy, Crohn disease, HIV, and congenital heart disease). She has been extensively involved in pediatric nutrition clinical care and research for more than 25 years. Dr. Stallings plays a broader role in the community of nutrition scientists and physicians as a past or current member of the IOM, the Food and Nutrition Board of the IOM, and the council of the American Society for Nutrition. She was

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90 RESEARCH METHODS TO ASSESS DIETARY INTAKE the chair of the committee that produced the 2007 IOM report Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools: Leading the Way Towards Healthier Youth. She chaired the IOM committee which made the 2010 recommendations to revise the school lunch and breakfast programs in the report, School Meals: Building Blocks for Healthy Children. She has received research and teach- ing awards from the American Society of Nutrition, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Institute of Medicine, National Academies. DIANNE STANTON WARD, Ph.D., is Professor and Director of the Inter- vention and Policy Division in the Department of Nutrition at the Univer- sity of North Carolina (UNC) Gillings School of Global Public Health. She is a Fellow of the UNC Highway Safety Research Center, the UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and the American College of Sport Medicine. Dr. Ward has more than 20 years of experience implement- ing obesity prevention interventions. Her work has focused on preschool- aged children in child care settings and the prevention of obesity through multicomponent school and community interventions that promote physi- cal activity and healthy eating. She led the team that developed the Nutri- tion and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care (NAP SACC), a highly regarded program that is now utilized by many states. Results from the evaluation of the NAP SACC program were published in 2008 and the program was selected for inclusion in the Center for Training and Research Translation sponsored by CDC. The NAP SACC program has been widely disseminated and aspects of the program were recently included in the First Lady’s Let’s Move Child Care initiative. She also published the first paper presenting comprehensive best practice physical activity guidelines for child care in 2009. Along with her research team, she developed the first assess- ment tool designed to evaluate the nutrition and physical activity charac- teristics at child care setting, and this instrument is among the most widely used to assess child care healthy weight environments. Dr. Ward holds a doctorate in physical education from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. In 2001 she received the Distinguished Alumni Award from the School of Health and Human Performance at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. ANN L. YAKTINE, Ph.D., is a Senior Program Officer and Study Direc- tor at the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) in the IOM of the National Academies. Prior to joining the FNB she was an instructor at the Univer- sity of Nebraska, Lincoln, and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Since joining the IOM in 2001, she has directed several studies, including Dioxins and Dioxin-Like Compounds in the Food Supply, Safety of Genetically Engineered Foods, Integrating Employee Health, Nutrient Relationships in Seafood, Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools, Preg-

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91 APPENDIX B nancy Weight Guidelines, and a Review of the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Dr. Yaktine has also coordinated workshops on nutrition and genomics and nanotechnology in foods. Dr. Yaktine received her Ph.D. in biochemistry and molecular biology from the Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases at the University of Nebraska Medical Cen- ter. She has co-authored a chapter on chemoprevention of cancer for the nutrition text Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease, was lead author of a chapter on integrated employee health management in the American College of Sports Medicine’s Worksite Health Handbook, and is author of a chapter on environmental contaminants in foods in the Encyclopedia of Lifestyle Medicine. She has also published journal reports on dietary effects on molecular pathways involved in cancer, and nutritional toxicology. Dr. Yaktine has been an invited speaker at the National Press Foundation an- nual meeting, the Alaska Forum on the Environment, the National Forum on Contaminants in Fish, the Federation of Experimental Biology, the Korean Academy of Sciences and Technology, and the Harvard School of Public Health.

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