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Speaker Biographical Sketches

Andrea Baruchin, Ph.D., is director of National Institutes of Health (NIH) Relations at the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH). In this role she is the liaison between the FNIH and the institutes and centers of NIH. Important aspects of her job are to educate about the FNIH and its activities and to proactively seek FNIH projects that support the foundation’s mission to foster public health through scientific discovery, translational research, and the dissemination of research results through specially configured, high-impact, public–private partnerships consistent with the priorities of NIH. Before joining the FNIH, Dr. Baruchin was chief of staff in the Office of Research at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Dr. Baruchin also previously served as associate director of the Vanderbilt Brain Institute. Prior to working at Vanderbilt University, Dr. Baruchin was chief of science policy at the National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, and she also served as associate director for science policy in the Office of Science Policy and Program Planning at the National Institute of Mental Health, NIH. Dr. Baruchin received her B.S. in biology and her M.S. in natural sciences from the State University of New York at Buffalo and her Ph.D. in molecular neurobiology from the University of Pittsburgh.

Richard M. Black, Ph.D., is vice president of global nutrition and chief nutrition officer at Kraft Foods. In this role, he is responsible for leading corporate-wide nutrition programs: developing strategies, guidelines, and portfolio improvement opportunities and providing overall accountability for nutrition research, nutrition communications, and nutrition business applications. Prior to joining Kraft, Dr. Black represented different organi-



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B Speaker Biographical Sketches Andrea Baruchin, Ph.D., is director of National Institutes of Health (NIH) Relations at the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH). In this role she is the liaison between the FNIH and the institutes and cen- ters of NIH. Important aspects of her job are to educate about the FNIH and its activities and to proactively seek FNIH projects that support the foundation’s mission to foster public health through scientific discovery, translational research, and the dissemination of research results through specially configured, high-impact, public–private partnerships consistent with the priorities of NIH. Before joining the FNIH, Dr. Baruchin was chief of staff in the Office of Research at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Dr. Baruchin also previously served as associate director of the Vanderbilt Brain Institute. Prior to working at Vanderbilt University, Dr. Baruchin was chief of science policy at the National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, and she also served as associate director for science policy in the Office of Science Policy and Program Planning at the National Institute of Mental Health, NIH. Dr. Baruchin received her B.S. in biology and her M.S. in natural sciences from the State University of New York at Buffalo and her Ph.D. in molecular neurobiology from the University of Pittsburgh. Richard M. Black, Ph.D., is vice president of global nutrition and chief nutrition officer at Kraft Foods. In this role, he is responsible for leading corporate-wide nutrition programs: developing strategies, guidelines, and portfolio improvement opportunities and providing overall accountability for nutrition research, nutrition communications, and nutrition business applications. Prior to joining Kraft, Dr. Black represented different organi- 61

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62 PUBLIC–PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS IN FOOD AND NUTRITION zations in a variety of technical and research positions. Most recently, he was executive director for the International Life Sciences Institute North America. As head of nutrition research, he worked at the Novartis Con- sumer Health Center in Switzerland guiding research in medical, health, and functional nutrition. At Nestlé in Canada, Dr. Black was director of scientific and regulatory affairs and manufacturing services. He was also manager of nutrition and scientific affairs at Kellogg Canada. At McMas- ter University, he received B.S. degrees in psychology and in chemistry and completed his Ph.D. in psychology. At the University of Toronto, Dr. Black did a postdoctoral fellowship in the Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, and subsequently served as assistant professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences. David Castle, Ph.D., is professor and chair of Innovation in the Life Sci- ences in the School of Political Science at the University of Edinburgh. His interests include innovation in the life sciences and social aspects of bio- technology, and his research focuses on the interaction between science and society, including democratic engagement, regulation and governance, and intellectual property and knowledge management. He has published dozens of peer-reviewed articles and book chapters and several books on the social dimensions of science, technology, and innovation. Dr. Castle has received several major research awards and has considerable experience leading strategic research initiatives and research project management. In addition, he has consulted widely for government and industry on issues such as the impact of national technology transfer policies and programs, intellectual property strategies for health research and development, and the role of nonscientific considerations in the regulation of science and technology. William Dietz, M.D., Ph.D., is director of the Division of Nutrition, Physi- cal Activity, and Obesity in the National Center for Chronic Disease Pre- vention and Health Promotion at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Prior to his appointment to the CDC, he was a profes- sor of pediatrics at Tufts University School of Medicine and director of clinical nutrition at the Floating Hospital of New England Medical Center Hospitals. In addition to his academic responsibilities in Boston, Dr. Dietz was a principal research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technol- ogy (MIT)–Harvard Division of Health Science and Technology, associate director of the Clinical Research Center at MIT, and director of the Boston Obesity/Nutrition Research Center funded by the National Institute of Dia- betes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). In 1995, he received the John Stalker Award from the American School Food Service Association for his efforts to improve school lunches. Dr. Dietz served on the 1995 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, as a past member of the NIDDK Task

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63 APPENDIX B Force on Obesity, and as a former president of the then American Society for Clinical Nutrition. Dr. Dietz was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1998. He received a B.A. from Wesleyan University, M.D. from the Uni- versity of Pennsylvania, and Ph.D. in nutritional biochemistry from MIT. Diane T. Finegood, Ph.D., is professor in the Department of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology at Simon Fraser University, British Columbia. Dr. Finegood leads the Chronic Disease Systems Modeling Lab, which houses staff and students working to build maps, models, and solution- oriented frameworks to help address the problem of obesity. Dr. Finegood also serves as executive director of the CAPTURE Project (Canadian Plat- form to Increase Usage of Real-World Evidence), which aims to build a system to support the collection and use of practice and policy-relevant, “real-world” evidence. In 2008, Dr. Finegood completed her 8-year tenure as scientific director of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Institute of Nutrition, Metabolism and Diabetes (INMD). During her appointment, she guided Canada’s health research agenda across INMD’s mandate and within its strategic priority on obesity and healthy body weight. Dr. Fine- good’s efforts helped to grow Canada’s obesity research and knowledge transfer efforts through support for research, development of innovative re- search programs, development of key partnerships, and innovative projects such as Canada on the Move and the Building Trust workshop series. Dr. Finegood received her M.Sc. in biomedical engineering from Northwestern University and her Ph.D. in physiology and biophysics from the University of Southern California. Eric Hentges, Ph.D., joined the International Life Science Institute, North America (ILSI-NA), as executive director in 2007. ILSI-NA is a nonprofit organization located in Washington, DC, that provides a forum for aca- demic, government and industry scientists to identify and resolve nutrition and food safety issues important to the health of the public. Prior to this appointment he served as the executive director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. In this position he had oversight of the USDA’s involvement in the development of the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and MyPyramid food guidance system. Dr. Hentges has more than 25 years of experience directing nutri- tion research, priority planning, and administration of competitive research grant programs for several national organizations. Additionally, he has led the development and implementation of nutrition education programs and consumer market research programs. Dr. Hentges holds degrees from Iowa State University, Auburn University, and Oklahoma State University. He is a member of the American Society for Nutrition and the Institute of Food Technologists.

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64 PUBLIC–PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS IN FOOD AND NUTRITION Jonathan H. Marks is associate professor of bioethics, humanities, and law at Pennsylvania State University, where he is also director of the Bio- ethics Program and associate director of the Rock Ethics Institute. Mr. Marks is currently a nonresidential fellow at the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University. He leads a collaborative research project exploring the ethical and policy implications of industry sponsorship of health-related food research, nutrition education, and practice. In 2008, he was co-organizer—with Donald B. Thompson, professor of food sci- ence at Pennsylvania State Universitye—of a workshop sponsored by the Rock Ethics Institute on the Ethical Challenges and Policy Implications of Industry-Funded Health-Related Food Research. The current research col- laboration builds on that workshop. Mr. Marks has published widely on the intersections of law, ethics (including professional ethics), and policy, and his work has appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine, American Journal of Law and Medicine, American Journal of Bioethics, and Hastings Center Report. He has also authored or co-authored op-eds for the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and The Times (London). Mr. Marks spent 2009-2011 in residence at the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard and, prior to joining Penn State, was a Greenwall fellow in bioethics at Georgetown and Johns Hopkins Universities. Mr. Marks is also a barrister and founding member of Matrix Chambers, London. Michael McGinnis, M.D., M.P.P., is a physician, epidemiologist, and long- time contributor to national and international health programs and pol- icy. He now is senior scholar and director of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care, as well as an elected IOM member. Much of his policy leadership stems from his four-administration tenure, perhaps unique among federal appointees, with continuous service through the Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton adminis- trations as the key point person for disease prevention and health promo- tion. Several still-prominent initiatives were launched under his guidance, including the Healthy People national goals and objectives process, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Internationally, he served as epidemiologist and state director for the successful World Health Organization smallpox eradication program in India and, more recently, as chair of the international task force to rebuild the health and human services sector in postwar Bosnia. Robert C. Post, Ph.D., M.Ed., M.Sc., is deputy director of the Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). He serves as an adviser to the under secretary for food, nutrition, and consumer services and serves collaboratively with the executive director on a broad range of policy, organizational, and technical

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65 APPENDIX B issues that focus on improving the health of Americans by developing and promoting dietary guidance that links scientific research to the nutrition needs of consumers. A primary goal for Dr. Post is to create remarkable ways to promote positive changes in the nutrition and health habits of Americans through a variety of effective educational and marketing tools, such as MyPyramid (MyPyramid.gov). He is dedicated to creating innova- tive promotional and outreach programs that help Americans make small steps toward improved dietary behaviors where they shop, work, play, and prepare foods. Dr. Post has been awarded certificates of merit for his techni- cal competence and leadership qualities in directing many vital USDA and interagency projects. He has also authored more than 75 technical papers and publications. Dr. Post holds a Ph.D. in public health and science educa- tion policy and program administration from the University of Maryland, where he also earned an M.Ed. in health communications, media, and technology; an M.S. in food science and microbiology; and a B.S. in food science and biochemistry. Sylvia B. Rowe, M.A., is currently president of SR Strategy, LLC, pursu- ing communications and issues management consulting on a broad range of health, nutrition, food safety, and risk issues. She is also an adjunct professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Previously, Ms. Rowe served as president and chief executive officer of the International Food Informa- tion Council (IFIC) and the IFIC Foundation, in Washington, DC. She has served on several boards and advisory committees of the following: the American Heart Association’s Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism; American Society of Association Executives Foundation; Food Update Foundation; Tufts University School of Nutrition Science and Policy Graduate Program in Nutrition Communication; University of Rochester Medical Center Nutrition Academic Award Program; Food and Drug Law Institute; Society for Nutrition Education Foundation; and Maryland Title IX Commission. She is also a member of the International Women’s Leader- ship Forum, National Press Club, American Newswomen’s Club, American Society of Association Executives, and Institute of Food Technologists. Ms. Rowe received a B.A. from Wellesley College and an M.A. from Harvard University, both with honors. Cheryl Toner, M.S., R.D., is currently serving as a fellow to the Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute. In her role there, she is exploring ways to facilitate dialogue and research collaboration between NIH and the food-related industries in order to bridge gaps between nutrition science and the food supply. Cheryl runs a consulting business in the Washington, DC, area, providing commu-

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66 PUBLIC–PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS IN FOOD AND NUTRITION nication and strategy services to organizations with a focus on food, health, and wellness. She is also actively involved in the American Dietetic Asso- ciation, currently serving as the member services director for the Sports, Cardiovascular, and Wellness Nutrition Practice Group. Prior to launching CDT Consulting, LLC, in 2007, Cheryl directed nutrition and food safety communication programs for the International Food Information Council. She earned a B.S. in nutrition at the University of Houston and an M.S. in nutrition at Texas Woman’s University, and she completed her dietetic internship at the Houston Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Catherine Woteki, Ph.D., is under secretary for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Research, Education, and Economics (REE) mission area and the department’s chief scientist. Before joining USDA, Dr. Woteki served as global director of scientific affairs for Mars, Inc., where she man- aged the company’s scientific policy and research on matters of health, nutrition, and food safety. From 2002 to 2005, she was dean of agriculture and professor of human nutrition at Iowa State University. Dr. Woteki served as the first under secretary for food safety at USDA from 1997 to 2001, where she oversaw U.S. government food safety policy development and USDA’s continuity of operations planning. Dr. Woteki also served as the deputy under secretary for REE at USDA in 1996. Prior to joining USDA, Dr. Woteki served in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy as deputy associate director for science from 1994 to 1996. Dr. Woteki has also held positions in the National Center for Health Statistics of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (1983-1990), in the Human Nutrition Information Service at USDA (1981-1983), and as direc- tor of the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences (1990-1993). In 1999, Dr. Woteki was elected to the IOM, where she has chaired the Food and Nutrition Board (2003-2005). She received her M.S. and Ph.D. in human nutrition from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Dr. Woteki received her B.S. in biology and chemistry from Mary Washington College.