B

Biographies of Committee Members and Staff

Deborah L. Estrin (NAE), Chair, is a professor of computer science with a joint appointment in electrical engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles; holds the Jon Postel Chair in Computer Networks; and is a co-founder of the non-profit, Open mHealth. Professor Estrin received her Ph.D. (1985) in computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her B.S. (1980) from the University of California, Berkeley. Her early research (conducted while she was on the Computer Science Department faculty at the University of Southern California [USC] and the USC Information Sciences Institute) focused on the design of network and routing protocols for very large, global networks, including multicast routing protocols, self-configuring protocol mechanisms for scalability and robustness, and tools and methods for designing and studying large-scale networks. From 2002 to 2012 she founded and directed the multidisciplinary, National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Science and Technology Center for Embedded Networked Sensing (CENS), which developed environmental monitoring technologies and applications (http://cens.ucla.edu). Currently Professor Estrin explores participatory sensing and mHealth systems, leveraging the programmability, proximity, and pervasiveness of mobile devices; deployment contexts include health (http://openmhealth.org), community data gathering, and education (http://mobilizingcs.org). Professor Estrin has been a co-principal investigator on numerous NSF and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)-funded projects and has been an active participant in several government-sponsored studies. She



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B Biographies of Committee Members and Staff Deborah L. Estrin (NAE), Chair, is a professor of computer science with a joint appointment in electrical engineering at the University of Cali- fornia, Los Angeles; holds the Jon Postel Chair in Computer Networks; and is a co-founder of the non-profit, Open mHealth. Professor Estrin received her Ph.D. (1985) in computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her B.S. (1980) from the University of Cali- fornia, Berkeley. Her early research (conducted while she was on the Computer Science Department faculty at the University of Southern California [USC] and the USC Information Sciences Institute) focused on the design of network and routing protocols for very large, global networks, including multicast routing protocols, self-configuring proto- col mechanisms for scalability and robustness, and tools and methods for designing and studying large-scale networks. From 2002 to 2012 she founded and directed the multidisciplinary, National Science Founda- tion (NSF)-funded Science and Technology Center for Embedded Net- worked Sensing (CENS), which developed environmental monitoring technologies and applications (http://cens.ucla.edu). Currently Professor Estrin explores participatory sensing and mHealth systems, leveraging the programmability, proximity, and pervasiveness of mobile devices; deployment contexts include health (http://openmhealth.org), commu- nity data gathering, and education (http://mobilizingcs.org). Professor Estrin has been a co-principal investigator on numerous NSF and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)-funded projects and has been an active participant in several government-sponsored studies. She 149

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150 COMPUTING RESEARCH FOR SUSTAINABILITY chaired a 1997-1998 DARPA Information Science and Technology Study Group study on sensor networks, and the 2001 National Research Council (NRC) study on networked embedded computing, which produced the report Embedded, Everywhere: A Research Agenda for Networked Systems of Embedded Computers. She later chaired the Sensors and Sensor Networks subcommittee of the NEON (National Ecological Observatory Network) Design Committee (www.neoninc.org). Professor Estrin also served on the Advisory Committees for the NSF Computer and Information Sci- ence and Engineering (CISE) and Environmental Research and Educa- tion (ERE) Directorates, and is a former member of the NRC’s Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. She was an editor of the IEEE/ ACM Transactions on Networking, and a program committee member for many networking-related conferences, including Sigcomm (Special Inter- est Group on Data Communication), Infocom (International Conference on Computer Communications), MobiCom, and MobiSys. She was the steering group chair and general co-chair for the first Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Conference on Embedded Networked Sen- sor Systems, Sensys 2003, and served as one of the first associate editors for the ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks. Professor Estrin is a fellow of the ACM, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. She was selected as the first ACM-W Athena Lecturer in 2006, was awarded the Anita Borg Institute’s Women of Vision Award for Innovation in 2007, was inducted into the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame in 2008, and awarded Doctor Honoris Causa from École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in 2008. Professor Estrin was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2007 and into the National Academy of Engineer- ing in 2009. Alan Borning is a professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington, an adjunct faculty member in the Information School, and a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery. He received a B.A. in mathematics from Reed College (1971) and an M.S. (1974) and a Ph.D. (1979) from Stanford University. His prin- cipal research interests are in human-computer interaction and designing for human values. His current research projects include online tools to support civic engagement and participation, mobile tools to aid transit riders, and designing systems to support more effective public participa- tion in land use and transportation deliberations, supported by sophis- ticated simulation data. Earlier he worked on programming languages and UI (user interface) toolkits, including constraint-based languages and systems and on object-oriented languages.

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APPENDIX B 151 David Culler (NAE), a professor and chair of computer science, associ- ate chair of electrical engineering and computer sciences, and faculty director of i4energy at the University of California, Berkeley, received his B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley (1980) and an M.S. and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1985 and 1989, respectively). He joined the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science faculty in 1989, where he holds the Howard Friesen Chair. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), and an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers fellow; he was selected for ACM’s Sigmod Outstanding Achievement Award, and was named in the Scientific American Top 50 Researchers and the Technology Review: 10 Technolo- gies That Will Change the World. He was awarded the National Science Foundation (NSF) Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1990 and the NSF Presidential Faculty Fellowship in 1992. He was the principal inves- tigator (PI) of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency network embedded systems technology project that created the open platform for wireless sensor networks based on TinyOS, a co-founder and the chief technology officer of Arch Rock Corporation, and the founding director of Intel Research, Berkeley. He has done seminal work on networks of small, embedded wireless devices, planetary-scale internet services, par- allel computer architecture, parallel programming languages, and high- performance communication, including TinyOS, PlanetLab, Networks of Workstations (NOW), and Active Messages. He has served on technical advisory boards for several companies, including People Power, Ink- tomi, ExpertCity (now Citrix Online), and DoCoMo USA. He is currently focused on utilizing information technology to address the energy prob- lem and is co-PI on the NSF Cyber-Physical Systems projects LoCal and ActionWebs. Thomas Dietterich, professor at Oregon State University (OSU), focuses on interdisciplinary research at the boundary of computer science, ecol- ogy, and sustainability policy. He is the principal investigator (with Carla Gomes of Cornell University) of a 5-year National Science Foundation (NSF) Expedition in Computational Sustainability. He is part of the lead- ership team for OSU’s Ecosystem Informatics programs, including an NSF Summer Institute in Ecoinformatics. Dr. Dietterich received his A.B from Oberlin College (1977), M.S. from the University of Illinois (1979), and Ph.D. from Stanford University (1984). He is professor and director of Intelligent Systems in the School of Electrical Engineering and Com- puter Science at OSU, having joined the faculty there in 1985. In 1987, he was named a Presidential Young Investigator for the NSF. In 1990, he published, with Dr. Jude Shavlik, the book entitled Readings in Machine

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152 COMPUTING RESEARCH FOR SUSTAINABILITY Learning, and he also served as the technical program co-chair of the National Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-90). From 1992 to 1998 he held the position of executive editor of the journal Machine Learn- ing. He is a fellow of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (1994), the Association for Computing Machinery (2003), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2007). In 2000, he co-founded the free Journal of Machine Learning Research and he is cur- rently a member of its editorial board. He served as technical program chair of the Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) conference in 2000 and as general chair in 2001. He is past president of the International Machine Learning Society (IMLS) and a member of the IMLS board, and he also serves on the advisory board of the NIPS Foundation. Daniel Kammen is the Class of 1935 Distinguished Professor of Energy at the University of California, Berkeley, with parallel appointments in the Energy and Resources Group, the Goldman School of Public Policy, and the Department of Nuclear Engineering. He serves as an Environment and Climate Partnership for the Americas (ECPA) Fellow for Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Dr. Kammen is the founding director of the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory (RAEL), co-director of the Berkeley Institute of the Environment, and director of the Transportation Sustain- ability Research Center. He has founded or is on the board of more than 10 companies and has served the State of California and the U.S. government in expert and advisory capacities. Dr. Kammen was educated in phys- ics at Cornell University and Harvard University, and held postdoctoral positions at the California Institute of Technology and Harvard. He was assistant professor and chair of the Science, Technology and Environmen- tal Policy Program at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University before moving to the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Kammen has served as a contributing or coordinating lead author on various reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) since 1999. The IPCC shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. During 2010-2011, Dr. Kammen served as the World Bank Group’s chief technical specialist for renewable energy and energy efficiency. In this newly created position to which he was appointed in October 2010, he provided strategic leadership on policy, technical, and operational fronts. The aim is to enhance the operational impact of the World Bank’s renewable energy and energy-efficiency activi- ties while expanding the institution’s role as an enabler of global dialogue on moving energy development to a cleaner and more sustainable path- way.
 He has authored or co-authored 12 books, written more than 250 peer-reviewed journal publications, testified more than 40 times at U.S. state and federal congressional briefings, and has provided various gov- ernments with more than 50 technical reports. Dr. Kammen also served

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APPENDIX B 153 for many years on the Technical Review Board of the Global Environment Facility. He is a frequent contributor to or commentator in international news media, including Newsweek, Time, The New York Times, The Guardian, and The Financial Times. Dr. Kammen has appeared on 60 Minutes (twice), Nova, and Frontline, and he hosted the six-part Discovery Channel series Ecopolis. He is a permanent fellow of the African Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Physical Society. In the United States he serves on a board and a panel of the National Academy of Sciences. Jennifer Mankoff is an associate professor in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. She earned her B.A. at Oberlin College and her Ph.D. in computer science at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research embodies a human-centered per- spective on data-driven applications. Her goal is to combine empirical methods with technological innovation to construct middleware (tools and processes) that can enable the creation of impactful data-driven applications. Examples of such application areas include sensing and influencing energy-saving behavior, web interfaces for individuals with chronic illness, and assistive technologies for people with disabilities. Dr. Mankoff helped found the sustainable-chi group (www.sustainable-chi@ googlegroups.com). Her research has been supported by Google, Inc., the Intel Corporation, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Microsoft Corporation, and the National Science Foundation. She was awarded the Sloan Fellowship and the IBM Faculty Fellowship. Roger D. Peng is an associate professor of biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He received his Ph.D. in sta- tistics from the University of California, Los Angeles. He is a prominent researcher in the areas of air pollution and health risk assessment and statistical methods for spatial and temporal data. Dr. Peng is a national leader in the area of methods and standards for reproducible research; he is the Reproducible Research editor for the journal Biostatistics. He has developed novel approaches to integrating complex national databases for assessing population health effects of environmental exposures and has developed software for efficiently distributing data over the web for disseminating reproducible research. Dr. Peng’s research is highly interdisciplinary; his work has been published in major substantive and statistical journals, including the Journal of the American Medical Asso- ciation, Journal of the American Statistical Association, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, and American Journal of Epidemiology. Dr. Peng is the author of more than a dozen software packages implementing statistical methods for environmental studies, methods for reproducible research,

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154 COMPUTING RESEARCH FOR SUSTAINABILITY and data distribution tools. He has also given workshops, tutorials, and short courses in statistical computing and data analysis. Andreas Vogel is vice president in the global business incubator at SAP Labs in Palo Alto, California, where he currently works on virtual econo- mies and recommender systems for online games. Previously he incubated a product for analyzing smart meter data and developed the next genera- tion of sustainability-related software solutions, including those involv- ing carbon accounting, energy management, and electrified vehicles. He also helped to create and implement SAP’s sustainability strategy. Before joining SAP, Dr. Andreas held various research, technology, and business positions around the world—among them, chief scientist at Borland and chief technology officer and co-founder of Mspect, where he developed monitoring solutions for mobile data networks. Dr. Andreas holds an M.Sc. and a Ph.D. in computer science from Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany. He co-authored four books on Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA), Enterprise Java Beans, and enterprise resource planning (ERP) published by J. Wiley and Sons. Staff Lynette I. Millett is a senior program officer and study director at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB), National Research Council of the National Academies. She currently directs several CSTB projects, including an exploration of foundational science in cyber- security. She recently completed the project that produced Strategies and Priorities for Information Technology at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Ms. Millett’s portfolio includes substantial portions of CSTB’s recent work on software, identity systems, and privacy. She directed, among other projects, those that produced The Future of Computing Per- formance: Game Over or Next Level?, an examination of the causes and implications of the slowdown in the historically dramatic exponential growth in computing performance; Software for Dependable Systems: Suf- ficient Evidence?, an exploration of fundamental approaches to develop- ing dependable mission-critical systems; Biometric Recognition: Challenges and Opportunities, a comprehensive assessment of biometric technology; Who Goes There? Authentication Through the Lens of Privacy, a discussion of authentication technologies and their privacy implications; and IDs—Not That Easy: Questions About Nationwide Identity Systems, a post-9/11 analy- sis of the challenges presented by large-scale identity systems. She has an M.Sc. in computer science from Cornell University, where her work was supported by graduate fellowships from the National Science Foundation

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APPENDIX B 155 and the Intel Corporation; and a B.A. with honors in mathematics and computer science from Colby College. Virginia Bacon Talati is an associate program officer at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council of the National Academies. She formerly served as a program associate with the Frontiers of Engineering program at the National Academy of Engineer- ing. Prior to her work at the Academies, she served as a senior project assistant in education technology at the National School Boards Associa- tion. She has a B.S. in science, technology, and culture from the Georgia Institute of Technology and an M.P.P. from George Mason University with a focus in science and technology policy. Shenae Bradley is a senior program assistant at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council of the National Academies. She has provided support for the Committee on Sustaining Growth in Computing Performance, the Committee on Wireless Tech- nology Prospects and Policy Options, and Computational Thinking for Everyone: A Workshop Series Planning Committee, to name a few. Previ- ously, she served as an administrative assistant for the Ironworker Man- agement Progressive Action Cooperative Trust and managed a number of apartment rental communities for Edgewood Management Corporation in the Maryland/DC/Delaware metropolitan areas. Ms. Bradley is in the process of earning her B.S. in family studies from the University of Maryland at College Park.

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