Appendix A

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Richard J. Ayen (Chair), now retired, was director of technology for Waste Management, Inc. Dr. Ayen managed all aspects of Waste Management’s Clemson Technical Center, including treatability studies and technology demonstrations for the treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste. His experience includes 20 years at Stauffer Chemical Company, where he was manager of the Process Development Department at Stauffer’s Eastern Research Center. He received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Illinois. Dr. Ayen has published extensively in his fields of interest. Dr. Ayen was a member of the National Research Council Committee on Review and Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons (I and II) and several committees dedicated to non-stockpile initiatives. Dr. Ayen currently also chairs the Committee on Chemical Demilitarization.

Douglas M. Medville (Vice Chair) retired from MITRE as program leader for chemical materiel disposal and remediation. He has led many analyses of risk, process engineering, transportation, and alternative disposal technologies and has briefed the public and senior military officials on the results. Mr. Medville was responsible for evaluating the reliability and performance of the demilitarization machines used by the Army to disassemble stockpile chemical munitions and wrote several test plans and protocols for alternative chemical munitions disposal technologies. He also led the evaluation of the operational performance of the Army’s chemical weapons disposal facility on Johnson Atoll and directed an assessment of the risks, public perceptions, environmental aspects, and logistics of transporting recovered non-stockpile chemical warfare materiel to candidate storage and disposal destinations. Before that, he worked at Franklin Institute Research Laboratories and General Electric. In recent years, he has participated as a committee member in nine National Research Council studies concerning the Army’s non-stockpile and Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternatives programs. Mr. Medville earned a B.S. in industrial engineering and an M.S. in operations research from New York University.

Dwight A. Beranek is a retired senior vice president of Michael Baker Jr., Inc., a professional engineering and consulting service for public-sector and private-sector clients worldwide. Previously, he served as deputy director for military programs in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, where he was responsible for executive management of its worldwide military programs mission. He is a registered professional engineer and a certified floodplain manager. He served on the National Research Council Committee on Bureau of Reclamation Dam Security and on the Federal Highway Administration–American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials Blue Ribbon Panel on Bridge and Tunnel Security. Mr. Beranek received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Northwestern University, an M.S in business administration from Boston University, and an M.P.A. from American University.

Edward L. Cussler (NAE) is the Distinguished Institute Professor and professor of chemical engineering at the University of Minnesota. After 13 years of teaching at Carnegie-Mellon University, he joined the University of Minnesota in 1980. Dr. Cussler conducts research on thin films, centering on membranes, with applications in water purification, and corrosion control; and on small-scale energy, with a goal of making individual farms energy self-sufficient. He has written over 220 articles and five books, including Diffusion: Mass Transfer in Fluid Systems; Bioseparations; and Chemical Product Design. He holds a Ph.D. and an M.S. from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and a B.E. from Yale University, all in chemical engineering. Dr. Cussler has received the Colburn and Lewis Awards from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, which he served as director, vice president, and president. He received the Separations Science Award from the American Chemical Society, the Merryfield Design Award from the American Society of Engineering



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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Richard J. Ayen (Chair), now retired, was director of engineering and an M.S. in operations research from New York University. technology for Waste Management, Inc. Dr. Ayen managed all aspects of Waste Management’s Clemson Technical Dwight A. Beranek is a retired senior vice president Center, including treatability studies and technology dem- of Michael Baker Jr., Inc., a professional engineering and onstrations for the treatment of hazardous and radioactive consulting service for public-sector and private-sector cli- waste. His experience includes 20 years at Stauffer Chemical ents worldwide. Previously, he served as deputy director Company, where he was manager of the Process Develop- for military programs in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, ment Department at Stauffer’s Eastern Research Center. where he was responsible for executive management of its He received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the worldwide military programs mission. He is a registered University of Illinois. Dr. Ayen has published extensively in professional engineer and a certified floodplain manager. his fields of interest. Dr. Ayen was a member of the National He served on the National Research Council Committee on Research Council Committee on Review and Evaluation of Bureau of Reclamation Dam Security and on the Federal Alternative Technologies for Demilitarization of Assembled Highway Administration–American Association of State Chemical Weapons (I and II) and several committees dedi- Highway and Transportation Officials Blue Ribbon Panel on cated to non-stockpile initiatives. Dr. Ayen currently also Bridge and Tunnel Security. Mr. Beranek received his B.S. chairs the Committee on Chemical Demilitarization. in mechanical engineering from Northwestern University, an Douglas M. Medville (Vice Chair) retired from MITRE M.S in business administration from Boston University, and an M.P.A. from American University. as program leader for chemical materiel disposal and remedi- ation. He has led many analyses of risk, process engineering, Edward L. Cussler (NAE) is the Distinguished Institute transportation, and alternative disposal technologies and has Professor and professor of chemical engineering at the Uni- briefed the public and senior military officials on the results. versity of Minnesota. After 13 years of teaching at Carnegie- Mr. Medville was responsible for evaluating the reliability Mellon University, he joined the University of Minnesota in and performance of the demilitarization machines used by 1980. Dr. Cussler conducts research on thin films, centering the Army to disassemble stockpile chemical munitions and on membranes, with applications in water purification, and wrote several test plans and protocols for alternative chemi- corrosion control; and on small-scale energy, with a goal of cal munitions disposal technologies. He also led the evalua- making individual farms energy self-sufficient. He has writ- writ- tion of the operational performance of the Army’s chemical ten over 220 articles and five books, including Diffusion: weapons disposal facility on Johnson Atoll and directed an Mass Transfer in Fluid Systems; Bioseparations; and Chemi- assessment of the risks, public perceptions, environmental cal Product Design. He holds a Ph.D. and an M.S. from the aspects, and logistics of transporting recovered non-stockpile University of Wisconsin–Madison and a B.E. from Yale Uni- chemical warfare materiel to candidate storage and disposal versity, all in chemical engineering. Dr. Cussler has received destinations. Before that, he worked at Franklin Institute the Colburn and Lewis Awards from the American Institute R esearch Laboratories and General Electric. In recent of Chemical Engineers, which he served as director, vice years, he has participated as a committee member in nine president, and president. He received the Separations Science National Research Council studies concerning the Army’s Award from the American Chemical Society, the Merryfield non-stockpile and Assembled Chemical Weapons Alterna- Design Award from the American Society of Engineering tives programs. Mr. Medville earned a B.S. in industrial 101

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102 REMEDIATION OF BURIED CHEMICAL WARFARE MATERIEL Education, and honorary doctorates from the University of ing for more than 20 years in health, safety, environment, Lund and the University of Nancy. He is a Fellow of the and sustainability. His most recent position was director of American Association for the Advancement of Science and science and technology policy; he was responsible for iden- a member of the National Academy of Engineering. tifying and addressing emerging environmental regulations and performance standards worldwide to support the com- Gilbert F. Decker, retired executive vice president of pany’s manufacturing operations and businesses. He received Walt Disney Imagineering, served as assistant secretary his Ph.D. in biochemical toxicology in the United Kingdom of the Army for research, development, and acquisition before moving to the United States to complete postdoctoral from 1994 to 1997. When he was assistant secretary of the training in toxicology at the Chemical Industry Institute of Army, two of his main responsibilities were research and Toxicology. He recently served on the Centers for Disease development for the chemical demilitarization program. Mr. Control and Prevention–Agency for Toxic Substances and Decker received his B.S. in electrical engineering from Johns Disease Registry National Conversation on Public Health Hopkins University in 1958 and served as an armor lieuten- and Chemical Exposures (the Serving Communities Work ant and army aviator until 1964. His active-duty assignments Group) and is on the Board of Directors of the Rochester- included helicopter pilot, battalion supply officer and com- based Center for Environmental Information, which works pany commander in Korea, and test, evaluation, and control to address regional environmental issues, such as watershed officer for the 11th Air Assault Division. He received an M.S. protection and community health. Dr. Guest is a full member in operations research from Stanford University in 1966. of the Society of Toxicology. From 1966 to 1994, Mr. Decker worked as a systems and Todd A. Kimmell is principal investigator in the Environ- design engineer, engineering project manager, director of marketing, president, or chief executive officer for several mental Science Division of the U.S. Department of Energy’s companies engaged in electronics systems for defense appli- Argonne National Laboratory. He is an environmental sci- cations; advanced computing, communications, and informa- entist and policy analyst with more than 30 years of expe- tion systems; and high-temperature materials and control rience in solid-waste and hazardous-waste management, systems for the aerospace and pollution-control industries. permitting and regulatory compliance, cleanup programs, The companies included ESL, Inc; TRW, Inc; Penn Central environmental programs policy development, and emergency Federal Systems Company; and Acurex Corporation. management and homeland security. He has supported the Army’s chemical and conventional munitions management Clair F. Gill received a B.S. from the U.S. Military programs and has contributed to the Army’s Assembled Academy and an M.S. in geotechnical engineering from Chemical Weapons Assessment Program and Chemical the University of California, Berkeley. He retired as the Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program. Mr. Kimmell chief of staff and deputy director of the Office of Facilities also has a strong technical background in analytical and Engineering and Operations of the Smithsonian Institution. physical–chemical test method development and analytical In that capacity, he oversaw all facilities maintenance, opera- quality assurance and control. He has served the U.S. Envi- tions, security, capital construction, and revitalization of the ronmental Protection Agency’s National Homeland Security institution’s museums and research facilities in Washington, Research Center on environmental test methods for chemi- D.C., and at several other locations in the United States and cal, biological, and radiological assessment for emergency abroad. Immediately before that, he served with the Depart- response. Mr. Kimmell has also supported a number of envi- ment of Energy, where he established and led the Office ronmental permitting programs at Army chemical weapons of Engineering and Construction Management. Mr. Gill storage sites and at open burning–open detonation sites. He retired from the U.S. Army in 1999, when he last served as graduated from George Washington University with an M.S. the Army’s budget director. Throughout his military career, in environmental science. Mr. Gill was involved directly in various major construction JoAnn Slama Lighty is professor in and chair of the projects, including military school facilities, a hotel complex, two flood-control systems, and reconstruction of a medi- Department of Chemical Engineering and adjunct professor cal center. He was involved in the operational concept, the of civil and environmental engineering at the University of environmental-impact statement, and the design and startup Utah. She received her B.S. and Ph.D. in chemical engineer- of construction of nearly one-fourth of a billion dollars of ing from the University of Utah. She is currently involved facilities to enable the Army to consolidate three branch in research on the formation of fine particulate matter from schools at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. combustion and gasification systems, including soot forma- tion and oxidation, and chemical looping technologies for Derek Guest is an independent consultant, providing effective carbon capture. Dr. Lighty is active in the American support to small businesses and community organizations in Institute of Chemical Engineers, of which she was recently addressing environmental, public-health, and sustainability selected as a fellow, and the Combustion Institute. She is the issues. He retired from Eastman Kodak Company after work- author of over 50 peer-reviewed publications and has given

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103 APPENDIX A over 125 conference presentations. In 2004, she was honored for 15 years as a professional staff member of the Committee with the Society of Women Engineers Distinguished Engi- on the Armed Services in the U.S. House of Representatives, neering Educator Award. Dr. Lighty has served previously on where he had principal staff responsiblility for oversight the National Research Council Committee on Technologies of the Department of the Navy research and development for Cleanup of Mixed Wastes in the DOE Weapons Complex. program, defensewide science and technology, and selected programs of other military services and defense agencies, James P. Pastorick is president of UXO Pro, Inc., a including the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency; technical consulting firm in Alexandria, Virginia, that spe- the Defense Threat Reduction Agency; joint experimenta- cializes in providing technical support to state regulators in tion, test, and evaluation; and chemical demilitarization and munitions and explosives of concern (MEC) project plan- chemical–biological defense. ning, management, and quality control, including chemical William R. Rhyne is a retired risk and safety analysis warfare material MEC. Since retiring from the U.S. Navy as a diving officer and explosive ordnance disposal techni- consultant to the nuclear, chemical, and transportation cian, he has worked for over 20 years in managing MEC industries, He has over 30 years of experience associated investigation and removal projects. He is certified by the with nuclear and chemical processing facilities and with the American Society for Quality as a manager of quality and transportation of hazardous materials. From 1984 to 1987, organizational excellence (CMQ/OE). Mr. Pastorick has he was the project manager and principal investigator for served on several National Research Council committees: a probabilistic analysis of transporting obsolete chemical the Committee to Review Assembled Chemical Weapons munitions. From 1997 to 2002, he was a member of the Alternatives Program Detonation Devices, the Committee National Research Council Committees for the Review and on Review and Evaluation of International Technologies for Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Demilitarization the Destruction of Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel, the of Assembled Chemical Weapons I and II. More recently, Committee on Review and Assessment of the Army Non- he has served on committees examining chemical stockpile Stockpile Chemical Demilitarization Program: Pine Bluff, secondary waste issues. Dr. Rhyne is the author or a coauthor the Committee for Review and Assessment of the Army of numerous publications on nuclear and chemical safety Non-Stockpile Chemical Demilitarization Program: Work- and risk analysis and is the author of Hazardous Materials place Monitoring, and the Committee for the Review and Transportation Risk Analysis: Quantitative Approaches for Evaluation of the Army Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel Truck and Train. He received a B.S. in nuclear engineering Disposal Program. from the University of Tennessee and an M.S. and a D.Sc. in nuclear engineering from the University of Virginia. Jean D. Reed is a consultant and Distinguished Research Tiffany N. Thomas is an environmental consultant for Fellow of the National Defense University’s Center for Tech- nology and National Security Policy, where he focuses on Tetra Tech, Inc. She has extensive experience in designing chemical–biological defense and the integration of research and executing novel scientific research in atmospheric chem- and development and national security policy. He is also a istry, environmental geochemistry, and materials science– senior fellow of the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies. He crystal growth chemistry. She has multiple publications in received a B.S. and an M.S. in physics from the University peer-reviewed scientific journals and presentations at various of Oklahoma and a master’s of military art and science from international academic conferences. For the last 5 years, she the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. He did has worked for Tetra Tech on various projects, including postgraduate studies in physics at Georgtown University. He multiple Department of Defense (DOD) sites contaminated is a graduate of the Army War College and the National War by chemical materiel and explosives, geochemical model- College and was a chief of staff Army fellow at the Army’s ing of metals releases from mining sites, and optimization Strategic Studies Institute. Appointed to the Senior Execu- of chlorinated-solvent treatment. She received her Ph.D. in tive Service in December 2005, Mr. Reed served as deputy inorganic chemistry from the University of California, Davis assistant to the secretary of defense (DATSD; Chemical and her B.S. in environmental chemistry from Northern Biological Defense–Chemical Demilitarization) in the Office Arizona University. Dr. Thomas has worked with Lawrence of the Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Nuclear Livermore National Laboratory, Savannah River National and Chemical and Biological Matters until April 2010. He Laboratory, the Department of Energy, DOD, and multiple exercised overall oversight, coordination, and integration state and local agencies. of all aspects of the Department of Defense chemical and William J. Walsh is an attorney in the Washington, biological medical and nonmedical defense program, which totaled about $1.5 billion a year, and of the program for D.C., office of Pepper Hamilton LLP. Before joining Pepper destruction of the U.S. stockpile of lethal chemical agents Hamilton, he was section chief in the Environmental Protec- and munitions, which also totaled about $1.5 billion a year. tion Agency Office of Enforcement. His legal experience Before assuming his position as DATSD, Mr. Reed served includes environmental regulatory advice and advocacy and

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104 REMEDIATION OF BURIED CHEMICAL WARFARE MATERIEL defense of environmental-injury litigation involving a broad Chemical Demilitarization Program: Workplace Monitoring, spectrum of issues pursuant to a variety of environmental the Committee for the Review and Evaluation of the Army statutes, including the Resource Conservation and Recovery Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel Disposal Program, and the Act and the Toxic Substances Control Act. Mr. Walsh holds Committee on Ground Water Cleanup Alternatives. a J.D. from George Washington University Law School and a Lawrence J. Washington, recently retired after working B.S. in physics from Manhattan College. He represents trade associations, including the Rubber Manufacturers Associa- for the Dow Chemical Company for over 37 years, where he tion and the American Dental Association, in rule-making and was corporate vice president for sustainability and environ- other public-policy advocacy. He has negotiated protective mental health and safety (EH&S). Among his many distinc- yet cost-effective remedies in pollution cases involving water, tions, Mr. Washington chaired the Corporate Environmental air, and hazardous waste and has advised technology devel- Advisory Council, the EH&S Management Board, and the opers and users on taking advantage of incentives for, and Crisis Management Team. In his role as corporate vice presi- eliminating regulatory barriers to, the use of innovative envi- dent for EH&S, Human Resources, and Public Affairs, Mr. ronmental technologies. Mr. Walsh has also served on several Washington led the creation of the Genesis Award Program National Research Council committees: the Committee on for Excellence in People Development. His career included Review and Evaluation of International Technologies for the many roles in operations, including being leader of Dow’s Destruction of Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel, the Com- Western Division and general manager and site leader of mittee on Review and Assessment of the Army Non-Stockpile Michigan Operations. Mr. Washington earned bachelor’s and Chemical Demilitarization Program: Pine Bluff, the Commit- master’s degrees in chemical engineering from the University tee for Review and Assessment of the Army Non-Stockpile of Detroit.