Appendix E

Speaker Biographies

David W. K. Acheson, M.D., FRCP, graduated from the University of London Medical School in 1980, and following training in internal medicine and infectious diseases in the United Kingdom, moved to the New England Medical Center and Tufts University in Boston in 1987. As an associate professor at Tufts University, he undertook basic molecular pathogenesis research on food-borne pathogens, especially Shiga toxin—producing E. coli.

In September 2002, Dr. Acheson became the Chief Medical Officer at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. Following several other positions at FDA he was appointed as Associate Commissioner for Foods, which gave him an agency-wide leadership role for all food and feed issues, including health promotion and nutrition.

In August 2009, Dr. Acheson took up a new position as the Managing Director for Food and Import Safety at Leavitt Partners LLC, a consulting firm with offices in Salt Lake City and Washington, DC. Leavitt Partners is working with a variety of multinational clients from the farm to retail to address food safety and food defense challenges.

Reinhard Burger, Ph.D., received his doctorate in 1976 and habilitation in 1982 at the Institute for Medical Microbiology at the University of Mainz. From 1983 to 1987 he served as professor for immunology, faculty for theoretical medicine at the University of Heidelberg. Since 1989 he has held the position of professor of immunology at the Free University of Berlin. Professor Burger has also been a visiting scientist at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Harvard Medical School, and the Medical University in Wuhan, China. From 1987 to 2011 he was the head of the Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology at the



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Appendix E Speaker Biographies David W. K. Acheson, M.D., FRCP, graduated from the University of London Medical School in 1980, and following training in internal medicine and infec- tious diseases in the United Kingdom, moved to the New England Medical Center and Tufts University in Boston in 1987. As an associate professor at Tufts University, he undertook basic molecular pathogenesis research on food-borne pathogens, especially Shiga toxin–producing E. coli. In September 2002, Dr. Acheson became the Chief Medical Officer at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. Following several other positions at FDA he was appointed as Associate Commissioner for Foods, which gave him an agency-wide leadership role for all food and feed issues, including health promotion and nutrition. In August 2009, Dr. Acheson took up a new position as the Managing Direc- tor for Food and Import Safety at Leavitt Partners LLC, a consulting firm with offices in Salt Lake City and Washington, DC. Leavitt Partners is working with a variety of multinational clients from the farm to retail to address food safety and food defense challenges. Reinhard Burger, Ph.D., received his doctorate in 1976 and habilitation in 1982 at the Institute for Medical Microbiology at the University of Mainz. From 1983 to 1987 he served as professor for immunology, faculty for theoretical medicine at the University of Heidelberg. Since 1989 he has held the position of professor of immunology at the Free University of Berlin. Professor Burger has also been a visiting scientist at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Harvard Medi- cal School, and the Medical University in Wuhan, China. From 1987 to 2011 he was the head of the Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology at the 385

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386 IMPROVING FOOD SAFETY THROUGH A ONE HEALTH APPROACH Robert Koch Institute, where he also served as Vice President from 2001 to 2010 and President since 2010. Professor Burger is a member of numerous scientific societies and numerous national and international expert committees. In 1993 he was appointed Chairman of the National Advisory Committee on Blood of the German Federal Ministry for Health, advising the federal government on all aspects of the safe and effi- cient use of blood components and plasma derivatives. He has many publications related to immunology and has also authored many recommendations, reports, and guidelines in the field of infectious diseases, immunology, and transfusion medicine, particularly concerning the safety of blood and blood products against transmission of infections and the detection of infectious agents. Peter Daszak, Ph.D., is President of EcoHealth Alliance, a United States–based organization that conducts research and field programs on global health and conservation. At EcoHealth Alliance, Dr. Daszak manages a headquarters staff of 35 and a global staff of more than 700 that conducts research and outreach initiatives to prevent emerging pandemics and conserve wildlife biodiversity. This includes research on zoonoses that spill over from wildlife in emerging disease “hotspots,” including influenza, Nipah virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), West Nile virus, and others. Dr. Daszak’s work includes identifying the first case of a species extinction due to disease, the discovery of chytridiomycosis, the major cause of global amphibian declines, publishing the first paper to highlight emerging diseases of wildlife, coining the term “pathogen pollution,” discovery of the bat origin of SARS-like coronaviruses, identifying the drivers of Nipah and Hendra virus emergence, and producing the first ever emerging disease “hotspots” map. Dr. Daszak is a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Microbial Threats and served on the IOM Committee on global surveillance for emerging zoonoses, the National Research Council (NRC) committee on the future of vet- erinary research, and the International Standing Advisory Board of the Australian Biosecurity CRC. In 2010, he advised the Director for Medical Preparedness Policy on the White House National Security Staff on global health issues. Dr. Daszak is a member of the Council of Advisors of the One Health Commission, Treasurer of DIVERSITAS (ICSU), Editor-in-Chief of the Springer journal Ecohealth, and former Treasurer and a Founding Director of the International Ecohealth Asso- ciation. In 2000, he won the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) medal for collaborative research in the discovery of amphib- ian chytridiomycosis. He has published more than 150 scientific papers, including in Science, Nature, PNAS, The Lancet, PLoS Biology, and other leading journals. Dr. Daszak was invited to present his work at TEDMED in 2010, and has been the focus of articles in the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Economist, The Washington Post, US News & World Report, CBS 60 Minutes, CNN, ABC, NPR’s Talk of the Nation, and Morning Edition & Fresh Air with Terri Gross. He

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387 APPENDIX E is a former guest worker at the CDC, where he assisted in the pathology activity during the 1999 Nipah virus outbreak. His work is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Fogarty International Center, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), Google.org, Rockefeller, and other foundations. To date, his organization is one of the few to have been awarded three prestigious NIH/NSF “Ecology of Infectious Disease” awards and is one of four partners to share a recent $75 million dollar award from USAID (“PREDICT”) with the goal of predicting and preventing the next emerging zoonotic disease. Michael P. Doyle, Ph.D., is a Regents Professor and Director of the Center for Food Safety at the University of Georgia, Griffin. A native of Madison, Wisconsin, he received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Wisconsin in bacteriology/food microbiology. From 1977 to 1980 he was senior project leader of corporate microbiology at Ralston Purina Company, and from 1980 to 1991 he advanced from assistant professor to Wisconsin Distinguished Professor of Food Microbiology, Food Research Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison. He serves on food safety committees of many organizations and has served as a scientific advisor to many groups, including the World Health Organization, the IOM, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS)-NRC, the International Life Sciences Institute-North America, the FDA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He has published more than 500 scientific papers on food microbiology and food safety topics and has received several awards for his re- search accomplishments, including the Nicholas Appert Award of the Institute of Food Technologists. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Institute of Food Technologists, and the International Association for Food Protection, and is a member of the IOM, for which he chairs the Food Forum. Rainer Engelhardt, Ph.D., is the Assistant Deputy Minister of the Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch of the Public Health Agency of Canada. Dr. Engelhardt has extensive senior executive management experience, as Chief Executive Officer of companies in the health sector, and in federal govern- ment positions. His corporate responsibilities have included serving as direc- tor and chairman of numerous boards of institutes and of private companies. Dr. Engelhardt’s broad experience includes development of federal legislation and environmental regulation, as well as management of large-scale national and international multisector science and technology research programs in Canada and the United States. Dr. Engelhardt has an extensive academic and applied research and publications record. He received his Ph.D. in biomedical physiology from the University of Guelph and began his career in academia, as a professor at Southeastern Massachusetts University and at the University of Ottawa.

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388 IMPROVING FOOD SAFETY THROUGH A ONE HEALTH APPROACH David Gombas, Ph.D., is Senior Vice President, Food Safety and Technology, for United Fresh Produce Association. In that position, he provides food safety, microbiology, and regulatory and public policy assistance for the fresh and fresh- cut produce industry. He has numerous publications on food safety, and recently served as co-editor of the Food Safety Programs and Auditing Protocol for the Fresh Tomato Supply Chain. Dr. Gombas is currently serving as coordinator of the Produce GAPs Harmonization Initiative and the U.S. National Technical Working Group for GlobalGAP. Dr. Gombas received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in food science from Rutgers University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, respectively, and his Ph.D. in food microbiology from University of Massachusetts. Previously, Dr. Gombas has held food safety and microbiol- ogy positions with the National Food Processors Association, Campbell Soup Company, Kraft Foods, and the National Center for Food Safety and Technology, where he worked with FDA to develop hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) training courses for FDA investigators. Will Hueston, D.V.M., Ph.D., is an internationally recognized veterinary public health leader known for his contributions to epidemiology tools such as surveil- lance systems and risk analysis and his expertise on the epidemiology and control of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad cow disease). Dr. Hueston is Execu- tive Director and Secretariat of the Global Initiative for Food Systems Leader- ship, a unique international educational consortium committed to enhancing teamwork and leadership in support of global food security. Well known for his expertise in risk communications, Dr. Hueston remains active in facilitating inno- vative approaches for tackling the increasingly complex dilemmas facing local, regional, and global food systems. Dr. Hueston’s leadership experience began as a community organizer and he has worked as a private veterinary practitioner, a resident veterinarian for a large agricultural cooperative, a field epidemiologist and professor, as well as in government service. He has demonstrated a lifelong commitment to the development of robust food systems that promote public health and sustainable development and livelihoods. Much of his work has fo- cused on building successful public–private partnerships around shared interests such as global food security. Dr. Hueston has extensive experience working with livestock producers, animal health officials, national government agencies, and intergovernmental organizations as well as consumer groups and multinational food companies. Martyn Jeggo, BVetMed, Ph.D., is the Director of CSIRO’s Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL) in Geelong and has held this position since 2002. Professor Jeggo brings a wealth of experience in controlling and detecting ex- otic and emerging animal disease to this vital role. AAHL is a global leader in research into and diagnosis of major diseases affecting livestock throughout the world. The Laboratory is a frontline defense, helping to protect Australia from

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389 APPENDIX E the threat of exotic and emerging animal diseases. In 2004, AAHL was designated as an international collaborating center for new and emerging diseases by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). This designation places AAHL at the forefront of international efforts to manage the growing number of disease agents that pose a risk to animal and human health. From 1996 to 2002, Profes- sor Jeggo was the Head of the Animal Production and Health Science Section of the Joint Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO)/International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Division of Agriculture in Vienna, Austria. In that role, he man- aged a range of FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Programs involving more than 200 research contracts relating to animal production and health. These were operational in some 130 countries. William Karesh, D.V.M., is Executive Vice President for Health and Policy at EcoHealth Alliance. He serves as President of the World Animal Health Organi- zation (OIE) Working Group on Wildlife Diseases and chairs the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Wildlife Health Specialist Group, a global network of hundreds of wildlife and health experts. Currently, Dr. Karesh is the Technical Director for the USAID Emerging Pandemic Threats PREDICT program, a $75 million effort focused on predicting and preventing pandemic diseases. Dr. Karesh has pioneered initiatives focusing attention and resources on solving problems created by the interactions among wildlife, people, and their animals and created the “One World—One Health” initiative linking public health, agriculture, and environmental health agencies and organizations around the world. International programs under his direction have covered terrain from Argentina to Zambia and include efforts to reduce the impact of diseases on humans and endangered species to global surveillance systems for emerging diseases. In addition to his work in the private sector, Dr. Karesh has worked for the USDA, DOD, the Department of the Interior (DOI), and the FAO of the United Nations and has published more than 150 scientific papers and numerous book chapters. Lonnie J. King, D.V.M., is the 10th dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at The Ohio State University (OSU). In addition to leading this college, Dr. King is also a professor of preventive medicine and holds the Ruth Stanton Endowed Chair in Veterinary Medicine. Before becoming dean at OSU, he was the Director of the CDC’s new National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED). In this new position, Dr. King leads the Center’s activities for surveil- lance, diagnostics, disease investigations, epidemiology, research, public education, policy development, and disease prevention and control programs. NCZVED also focuses on water-borne, food-borne, vector-borne, and zoonotic diseases of public health concern, which also include most of the CDC’s select and bioterrorism agents, neglected tropical diseases, and emerging zoonoses. Before serving as director, he was the first chief of the agency’s Office of Strategy and Innovation.

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390 IMPROVING FOOD SAFETY THROUGH A ONE HEALTH APPROACH Dr. King served as dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, from 1996 to 2006. As at OSU, he served as the CEO for academic programs, research, the teaching hospital, the diagnostic center for population and animal health, basic and clinical science departments, and the outreach and continu- ing education programs. As dean and professor of large-animal clinical sciences, Dr. King was instrumental in obtaining funds for the construction of a $60 million Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health; he initiated the Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases in the college, he served as the campus leader in food safety, and he had oversight for the National Food Safety and Toxicology Center. In 1992, Dr. King was appointed administrator for the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), USDA, in Washington, DC. In this role, he provided executive leadership and direction for ensuring the health and care of animals and plants, to improve agricultural productivity and competitiveness, and to contribute to the national economy and public health. Dr. King also served as the country’s chief veterinary officer for 5 years, worked extensively in global trade agreements within the North American Free Trade Agreement and the World Trade Organization, and worked extensively with the World Animal Health Association. During this time he was the Deputy Administrator for Veterinary Services of APHIS, USDA, where he led national efforts in disease eradication, imports and exports, and diagnostics in both Ames, Iowa, and Plum Island. He spent 5 years in Hyattsville, Maryland, in staff assignments in Emergency Pro- grams, as well as in Animal Health Information. While in Hyattsville, Dr. King directed the development of the agency’s National Animal Health Monitoring System. He left APHIS briefly to serve as the Director of the Governmental Relations Division of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) in Washington, DC, and served as the lobbyist for the AVMA on Capitol Hill. Dr. King was in private veterinary practice for 7 years in Dayton, Ohio, and Atlanta, Georgia. As a native of Wooster, Ohio, Dr. King received his bachelor of science and doctor of veterinary medicine degrees from OSU in 1966 and 1970, respectively. He earned his master of science degree in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota and received his master’s degree in public administra- tion from American University in Washington, DC, in 1991. Dr. King is a board- certified member of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine and has completed the Senior Executive Fellowship program at Harvard University. He served as president of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Col- leges from 1999 to 2000 and was the vice-chair for the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues from 2000 to 2004. He has served on four NAS committees, including chairing the National Academies’ Committee on Assess- ing the Nation’s Framework for Addressing Animal Diseases. He is also Chair of the IOM Committee on Lyme Disease and Other Tick-Borne Diseases and for State of the Science, and he is also chairing the AVMA’s Commission for AVMA Vision 2020. Dr. King is currently a member of the IOM Committee on Microbial Threats to Health, is a past member of FDA’s Board of Scientific Advisors, and

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391 APPENDIX E is past president of the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society. He served as the chair for the national One Medicine Task Force for the AVMA, which helped start the country’s One Health Initiative. Dr. King was elected as a member of the IOM of the National Academies in 2004. Marion Koopmans, D.V.M., Ph.D., completed her training in veterinary medi- cine at the Utrecht University, Veterinary Faculty. She worked as associate profes- sor at the same Faculty to become a specialist in large animal internal medicine and nutrition. In parallel, she completed her Ph.D. in veterinary sciences (virol- ogy, 1990), studying novel enteric viruses and their importance as pathogens for cattle. She continued to study enteric viruses during a fellowship and as visiting scientist at the CDC from 1991 until 1994, and returned to the Netherlands to become section chief of the enteric virus group at the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM). She is coordinator of a European research and surveillance network on enteric viruses, and since 2000 holds the chair of the Virology Division of the Diagnostic Laboratory for Infectious Diseases at RIVM. Her responsibilities include reference diagnostics, syndromic surveillance, and emergency preparedness for viral diseases, including research aimed at improving the response capacity of a public health laboratory. In 2006 she was appointed professor of public health virology at the Erasmus University in Rotterdam. Her research interests include enteric viruses, emerging disease preparedness, and infections at the human–animal interface, with a par- ticular focus on unraveling mechanisms underlying possible emergence of new health threats and optimizing the early detection and response. She has authored more than 200 papers in peer-reviewed journals. W. Ian Lipkin, M.D., is internationally recognized as an authority on the use of molecular methods for pathogen discovery. Dr. Lipkin has more than 30 years of experience in diagnostics, microbial discovery, and outbreak response, has mentored and trained more than 30 students and postdoctoral fellows, and leads a team of more than 65 investigators, postdoctoral fellows, and research and support staff at the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. In the 1980s, Dr. Lipkin identified AIDS-associated immunological abnormalities and inflammatory neuropathy, which he showed could be treated with plasmapheresis, and demonstrated that early life exposure to viral infections affects neurotransmitter function. He was the first to use purely molecular methods to identify infectious agents, implicated West Nile virus as the cause of the encephalitis epidemic in New York in 1999, assisted the WHO and the Peoples Republic of China during the 2003 SARS outbreak, developed MassTag PCR and Greenechip technology, and pioneered the use of high-throughput se- quencing in pathogen discovery. He and his team have discovered or characterized more than 400 infectious agents including Borna disease virus, West Nile virus, LuJo virus, human rhinovrirus C, piscine reovirus, and canine hepacivirus.

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392 IMPROVING FOOD SAFETY THROUGH A ONE HEALTH APPROACH Steve Luby, M.D., has overseen CDC activities in Bangladesh since 2004. He is secunded from CDC and posted into the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), where he heads the Centre for Com- municable Diseases. Dr. Luby earned his medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas in 1986 and completed his intern- ship and residency in internal medicine at the University of Rochester-Strong Memorial Hospital. He studied epidemiology and public health in the Epidemic Intelligence Service and the Preventive Medicine Residency of the CDC. From 1993 to 1998, Dr. Luby directed the Epidemiology Unit of the Community Health Sciences Department at the Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan. Dr. Luby has authored more than 170 scientific articles, the majority concerning commu- nicable disease epidemiology in low-income countries. Mike Robach joined Cargill in January of 2004 to lead the company’s global food safety and regulatory programs. In this role he leads Cargill’s corporate efforts across food protection and security, quality assurance, animal health, and regulatory compliance. Mr. Robach started out his career with Monsanto Company, and prior to joining Cargill he headed up technical services for Wayne Farms LLC. Mr. Robach is a graduate of Michigan State University and Virginia Tech. He is a member of the Board of the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI), the American Meat Institute, the National Turkey Federation, GMA’s Science Institute Executive Board, past Chairman of the U.S Poultry and Egg Association’s Research Advisory Committee, a member of the Inter- national Association of Food Protection, the Institute of Food Technologists, and the American Society for Microbiology. Mr. Robach is the past President of Safe, Supply of Affordable Food Everywhere (SSAFE), a group of global food companies, non-governmental organizations, intergovernmental agencies, and universities working together to ensure the safety and security of the global food supply chain. He has worked closely with the OIE, FAO, USDA, FDA, and global governments regarding food safety policy, HACCP, and regulatory reform based on science. From 1995 through 2000, Mr. Robach was a member of the National Advisory Committee for Microbiological Criteria in Foods. Robert Tauxe, M.D., M.P.H., is Deputy Director of the Division that is charged with prevention and control of food-borne, water-borne, and fungal infections at the CDC. The Division monitors the frequency of these infections in the United States, investigates outbreaks, and develops strategies to reduce the disease, dis- ability, and deaths that they cause. Dr. Tauxe graduated from Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, cum laude in 1975 and received his medical degree from Vanderbilt Medical School in Nashville, Tennessee. In addition, he holds a master’s in public health degree from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. Dr. Tauxe completed an inter- nal medicine residency at the University of Washington and is certified in internal

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393 APPENDIX E medicine. He then trained at the CDC in the Epidemic Intelligence Service for 2 years and joined the CDC staff in 1985. His interests include bacterial enteric diseases, epidemiology and pathogen- esis of infectious diseases, epidemiologic and clinical consequences of bacterial genetic exchange, antimicrobial use and resistance to antimicrobial agents, and teaching epidemiologic methods. Dr. Tauxe’s memberships include the American Epidemiology Society, the American College of Physicians, the American Society for Microbiology, and the American Academy of Microbiology; he is a Fellow of the Infectious Dis- eases Society of America and a member of the National Advisory Committee on Microbial Criteria for Foods. He has also served internationally in Belgium, Mali, Rwanda, Peru, and Guatemala and has supervised numerous domestic and overseas epidemiologic investigations. His faculty appointments include the School of Public Health, Department of International Health, and the Department of Biology, both at Emory University, Atlanta. Dr. Tauxe has authored/co-authored 254 scientific journal articles, letters, and book chapters. Michael R. Taylor, J.D., was named Deputy Commissioner for Foods at FDA on January 13, 2010. He is the first individual to hold the position, which was created along with a new Office of Foods in August 2009 to elevate the leadership and management of FDA’s Foods Program. Mr. Taylor is a nationally recognized food safety expert, having served in high-level positions at FDA and the USDA, as a research professor in academia, and on several NAS expert committees. As Deputy Commissioner for Foods, Mr. Taylor provides leadership and direction to all food programs in the Agency, including those managed by the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) and the Center for Vet- erinary Medicine (CVM), and the foods-related programs of FDA’s inspection and compliance arm, the Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA). Mr. Taylor returned to FDA in July 2009 as Senior Advisor to the Commis- sioner. Before that, he served as research professor, School of Public Health and Health Services, George Washington University. His research agenda focused on policy, resource, and institutional issues that affect the success of public health agencies in carrying out their prevention-related missions. Mr. Taylor received his law degree from the University of Virginia and his B.A. degree in political science from Davidson College. Henrik C. Wegener, Ph.D., completed his master’s in food science and a doctor- ate in microbiology from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. He has been involved in food safety research since 1987. Initially he worked as a molecular microbiologist from 1987 to 1994, and then for 10 years he headed surveillance and epidemiological research at the Danish Zoonosis Centre. In 2004, he became head of the Department of Epidemiology and Risk Assessment, at the National

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394 IMPROVING FOOD SAFETY THROUGH A ONE HEALTH APPROACH Food Institute in Denmark, and since 2006 he has been the Director of the In- stitute. Since November 2011 he has been the Chief Academic Officer of the Technical University of Denmark. He is adjunct professor of zoonoses epide- miology at the University of Copenhagen, and he has been Head of the WHO Collaborating Centre on Antimicrobial Resistance in Foodborne Pathogens and head of the European Food Safety Authorities Zoonosis Collaboration Centre. He was involved in the establishment of the WHO Global Foodborne Infections Net- work. Dr. Wegener has received the Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics— International Leadership Award to Preserve the Power of Antibiotics. He is an associate editor of the Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, and he has published more than 100 scientific papers and book chapters. Craig Wilson is Vice President, General Merchandising Manager of Quality Assurance and Food Safety for Costco Wholesale Corporation. Costco Wholesale Corporation operates membership warehouses that offer a selection of branded and private-label products in a range of merchandise categories. Prior to joining Costco Wholesale, Mr. Wilson worked as a Special Projects Director for Frigoscandia Equipment Food Safety Systems for more than 20 years. During his time with Frigoscandia, he published numerous research papers in the areas of food safety and food processing and holds five patents, the most notable for steam pasteurization of food. He is the recipient of the Gia/Matek Excellence in Food Safety Award and serves on the Steering Committee for the National Food Safety Consortium as well as the Technical Committee of the GFSI. Nathan Wolfe, D.Sc., is an epidemiologist who fights disease pandemics with an unprecedented early-warning system to forecast, pinpoint, and control new plagues worldwide before they kill millions. He is the Lorry I. Lokey Visiting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University and the founder and CEO of Global Viral Forecasting (GVF), an independent research institute founded in 2008. His survey of diseases that have historically had the greatest impact on humanity revealed that most started with animals. Based on this, he created a global network of sites in viral hotspots where people are highly exposed to animals and are most at risk for early infection when viruses leap from animals to humans. GVF, which coordinates more than 100 scientists and staff globally, spots viruses as soon as they surface by collecting and cataloguing blood samples, sur- veying wild animals, scanning urban blood banks, and documenting the transfer and distribution on disease. Data gleaned from a dozen field sites in Cameroon, China, Malaysia, and other countries have led to the discovery of a number of previously unknown infectious agents, notably simian foamy and T-lymphotropic viruses that emerged into humans from primate reservoirs. Dr. Wolfe has received numerous awards including a Fulbright fellowship and an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award and was chosen as a National Geographic

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395 APPENDIX E Emerging Explorer and World Economic Forum Young Global Leader. He was also named one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World for 2011. Dr. Wolfe has more than 80 scientific publications, and his work has been published in or covered by Nature, Science, The New York Times, The Economist, NPR, The New Yorker, and Forbes, among others. He has received support total- ing more than $30 million in grants and contracts from Google.org, NIH, NSF, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, DOD, and others. Cathie Woteki, Ph.D., is Under Secretary for the USDA’s Research, Education, and Economics (REE) mission area, and the Department’s Chief Scientist. Before joining the USDA, Dr. Woteki served as Global Director of Scientific Affairs for Mars, Inc., where she managed the company’s scientific policy and research on matters of health, nutrition, and food safety. From 2002 to 2005, she was dean of agriculture and professor of human nutrition at Iowa State University. Dr. Woteki served as the first Under Secretary for Food Safety at the USDA from 1997 to 2001, where she oversaw U.S. government food safety policy development and the USDA’s continuity of operations planning. Dr. Woteki also served as the Deputy Under Secretary for REE at the USDA in 1996. Dr. Woteki served in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy as Deputy Associate Director for Science from 1994 to 1996. Dr. Woteki has also held positions in the National Center for Health Statistics of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (1983-1990), the Human Nutrition Information Service at the USDA (1981-1983), and as Director of the Food and Nutrition Board of the IOM (1990-1993). In 1999, Dr. Woteki was elected to the IOM, where she has chaired the Food and Nutrition Board (2003-2005). She received her M.S. and Ph.D. in human nutrition from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (1974). Dr. Woteki received her B.S. in biology and chemistry from Mary Washington College (1969).

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