Appendix B

Speaker, Moderator, and Panelist Biographies

Amy P. Abernethy, M.D., is a tenured associate professor in the Duke University Schools of Medicine and Nursing, director of the Duke Cancer Care Research Program, and a medical oncologist and palliative medicine physician. She is an appointee to the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) National Cancer Policy Forum, president-elect of the American Academy of Hospice & Palliative Medicine, a member of the board of directors for the Personalized Medicine Coalition and of the Advisory Board for the Rapid Learning System for Cancer for the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and co-chair of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)–funded Palliative Care Research Cooperative Group. Dr. Abernethy participates integrally in international discussions about reforming the evidence development system, presenting a model for rapid learning health care by coordinating clinical and research functions to better serve patients’ needs in an evidence-driven, cost-effective, and patient-centered manner.

Dr. Abernethy is an internationally recognized expert in health services research and delivery in patient-centered cancer care. She directs the Duke Cancer Care Research Program, which conducts patient-centered clinical trials, analyses, and policy studies. The Duke Cancer Care Research Program maintains a large portfolio of NIH, National Cancer Institute (NCI), Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), philanthropic, and private funding. All studies make use of, and simultaneously contribute to the development of, an integrated data system that coordinates diverse



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Appendix B Speaker, Moderator, and Panelist Biographies Amy P. Abernethy, M.D., is a tenured associate professor in the Duke University Schools of Medicine and Nursing, director of the Duke Cancer Care Research Program, and a medical oncologist and palliative medicine physician. She is an appointee to the Institute of Medicine's (IOM's) National Cancer Policy Forum, president-elect of the American Academy of Hospice & Palliative Medicine, a member of the board of directors for the Personalized Medicine Coalition and of the Advisory Board for the Rapid Learning System for Cancer for the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and co-chair of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)funded Palliative Care Research Cooperative Group. Dr. Abernethy participates integrally in international discussions about reforming the evidence development system, presenting a model for rapid learning health care by coordinating clinical and research functions to better serve patients' needs in an evidence- driven, cost-effective, and patient-centered manner. Dr. Abernethy is an internationally recognized expert in health services research and delivery in patient-centered cancer care. She directs the Duke Cancer Care Research Program, which conducts patient-centered clinical trials, analyses, and policy studies. The Duke Cancer Care Research Pro- gram maintains a large portfolio of NIH, National Cancer Institute (NCI), Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), philanthropic, and private funding. All studies make use of, and simultaneously contribute to the development of, an integrated data system that coordinates diverse 109

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110 INFORMATICS NEEDS AND CHALLENGES IN CANCER RESEARCH datasets, leverages novel information technology for patient reporting of symptoms and other concerns, informs future studies, and facilitates patient education and patientprovider communication. Dr. Abernethy is coprincipal investigator (PI) of the NIH-funded Palliative Care Research Cooperative Group and co-PI of an NCI-funded faculty development (K01) program in comparative effectiveness research to develop the research workforce of the future. Asif Ahmad, M.B.A., M.S., joined US Oncology, now a part of M cKesson Specialty Health, in 2010 as the executive vice president, Technology Ser- vices. He currently manages Information and Technology Services, where he is responsible for leading the development and evolution of strategy related to information technology (IT) and the company's several IT-based busi- nesses and services. Mr. Ahmad served as vice president, Diagnostic Service, and chief information officer and associate dean, Academic Computing and Imaging, School of Medicine at Duke University Health System and Medical Center from 2003 to 2010. Prior to that, he was administrator and chief informa- tion officer at the Ohio State University Health System and Medical Center. He earned an M.B.A. at Max M. Fisher College of Business and an M.S. in biomedical engineering at the Ohio State University. He received his B.S. (honors) in electrical engineering from the University of Engineering and Technology in Lahore, Pakistan. Sam Butler, M.D., brings a wealth of knowledge to Epic's Clinical Infor- matics Team, with 8 years of senior-level experience in multispecialty medi- cal group management, along with 14 years of clinical practice experience. He helps to guide the direction of Epic's applications. He is heavily involved in the creation and development of Epic and third-party content for use in clinical applications. Dr. Butler has a B.S. in interdisciplinary science and received his M.D. from the University of Florida. Atul Butte, M.D., Ph.D., is chief of the Division of Systems Medicine and associate professor (tenured) of pediatrics and, by courtesy, m edicine and computer science, at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Chil- dren's Hospital. Dr. Butte trained in computer science at Brown University, worked as a software engineer at Apple and Microsoft, received his M.D. from Brown University, trained in pediatrics and pediatric endocrinology at Children's Hospital Boston, and received his Ph.D. in health sciences and

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APPENDIX B 111 technology from Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He has authored more than 110 publications, deliv- ered more than 120 invited presentations, and received a number of awards, including the Society for Pediatric Research Young Investigator Award, induction into the American College of Medical Informatics, the American Medical Information Association (AMIA) New Investigator Award, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Early Career Award, and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) Founda- tion Research Starter Grant in Informatics. Dr. Butte coauthored one of the first books on microarray analysis, Microarrays for an Integrative Genomics, published by MIT Press. The Butte Laboratory, funded by HHMI and 16 NIH grants, builds and applies tools that convert more than 300 billion points of molecular, clinical, and epidemiological data--measured by researchers and clinicians over the past decade--into diagnostics, therapeutics, and new insights into disease. The Butte Lab has developed tools to index and find genomic datasets based on the phenotypic and contextual details of each experi- ment, to remap microarray data, to deconvolve multicellular samples, and to perform these calculations on the Internet "cloud." The Butte Lab has used these tools on publicly available molecular data to successfully find new uses for existing drugs and has also been developing novel methods for comparing clinical data from electronic health record (EHR) systems with gene expression data. August Calhoun, Ph.D., leads the Dell Healthcare and Life Sciences busi- ness. The group is responsible for delivering services-based solutions to hospitals, payers, physicians, life sciences companies, and other key players in the health care industry. In this role, Dr. Calhoun oversees global strategy, executive leadership, operations, and business development. Dr. Calhoun has more than 15 years of experience in the health care and life sciences industry, during which time he has focused on research productivity, life sciences sales force effectiveness, translational medicine, and health care outcomes management. He has expertise in data manage- ment, technology strategy, high-performance computing, and process improvement. Prior to his current role, Dr. Calhoun was responsible for sales and business development of the Dell Healthcare and Life Sciences industry team, where he led efforts to implement innovative solutions to automate operations for health care payers, providers, and life sciences customers.

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112 INFORMATICS NEEDS AND CHALLENGES IN CANCER RESEARCH He has also served Dell customers through end user services optimiza- tion, service desk improvement, asset utilization, and remote data center operations. Prior to joining Dell, Dr. Calhoun worked at the IBM Corporation, where he managed the global pharmaceutical sales and solutions team, as well as a health care consulting team. He was also responsible for relation- ships with large health care and life sciences clients and held earlier positions in IBM Global Services. Dr. Calhoun has a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Delaware in Newark. James Cimino, M.D., is chief of the Laboratory for Informatics Develop- ment at the NIH Clinical Center, a senior scientist at the National Library of Medicine (NLM), and an adjunct professor in biomedical informatics at Columbia University. He is charged with the development of an institute- wide Biomedical Translational Research Information System (BTRIS) and conducts clinical informatics research. Dr. Cimino has been an active member of the NLM Board of Scientific Counselors, co-chair of the HL-7 Vocabulary Technical Committee, and a member of the board of the Ameri- can Medical Informatics Association. He is a fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics, the American College of Physicians, the American Clinical and Climatologic Association, and the New York Academy of Medicine and has received a number of awards. Previously, Dr. Cimino was with the Center for Medical Informatics (now the Department of Biomedical Informatics) at Columbia Univer- sity College of Physicians and Surgeons, where he conducted informatics research, built clinical information systems, taught informatics and medi- cine, and practiced general internal medicine. He published landmark work on controlled terminologies (including a widely adopted set of "desiderata"), the Unified Medical Language System, the use of the Internet in health care, patient access to personal health records, studies of clinician information needs, and development of the "infobutton." Dr. Cimino received a degree in computers in the biomedical sci- ences at Brown University and an M.D. at New York Medical College. He completed his medical internship and residency at Saint Vincent's Hospi- tal in New York and an NLM-sponsored research fellowship in medical informatics at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard School of Public Health.

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APPENDIX B 113 Adam M. Clark, Ph.D., is a patient advocacy consultant and founder, MedTran Health Strategies. Previously, he was a program officer program officer in the Division of Strategic Science and Technology for the Bio- medical Advanced Research and Development Authority within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness & Response. In this position he administers drug, diagnostic, and medical technology development programs aimed at advancing medical countermeasures to protect the public health. Previously, Dr. Clark has worked with numerous patient advocacy and disease research organizations including LIVESTRONG, a cancer research advocacy organization founded by Lance Armstrong, where he served as director of science and health policy. Prior to his work at the foundation, he served as a technology development specialist at NCI, developing programs in cancer biomarker detection technologies. In his time at NCI, Dr. Clark also performed assignments in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the Office of the Secretary of HHS. Dr. Clark has a background in biomedical sciences as a researcher, program administrator, and policy adviser with a focus on molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine. Dr. Clark has served on several committees and advisory boards, including the Federal Advisory Committee for Health Information Tech- nology Policy at HHS and the NCI Director's Consumer Liaison Group. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and was trained in science and health policy through the Emerging Leaders Program at HHS. Robert L. Comis, M.D., is president and chair of the Coalition of Cancer Cooperative Groups (the coalition); group chair of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG); and professor of medicine and director of the Drexel University Clinical Trials Research Center. A leader in international clinical trials research since 1977, Dr. Comis also serves as president of the ECOG Research and Education Foundation; president of Alpha Oncology, a coalition clinical research division; and chair of ITA Partners. Dr. Comis is a champion of patient access to cancer clinical trials, spearheading multiple initiatives to raise awareness about the pivotal role of cancer clinical trials in cancer prevention, detection, and treatment. He is a current member of the board of directors for C-Change and the National Coalition for Cancer Research, as well as a past board member of the Ameri- can Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), where he served on a number of

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114 INFORMATICS NEEDS AND CHALLENGES IN CANCER RESEARCH ASCO committees. While chairing the Group Chairs for the Cooperative Group Program, he raised the international profile of the program and initi- ated efforts to strengthen and reposition it for the future. He has served on a number of editorial boards, authored more than 140 scientific articles, and contributed to more than 20 scientific and medical textbooks on cancer. Dr. Comis is sought as a subject matter expert to the U.S. Congress, the IOM, President's Cancer Panel, National Cancer Advisory Board, and many other national and international organizations. A graduate of Fordham University, Dr. Comis received his medical degree from the State University of New York (SUNY) Health Science Center School of Medicine, where he also completed his medical internship and residency. He served as a staff associate at NCI and completed a medical oncology fellowship at the Sidney Farber Cancer Center at Harvard Medi- cal School. He has held clinical practice and research leadership positions at Thomas J efferson University Hospital, Temple University School of Medi- cine, Fox Chase Cancer Center, and Allegheny Cancer Center. Dr. Comis is a diplomate of the American Board of Internal Medicine and a member of the American College of PhysiciansAmerican Society of Internal Medicine. William S. Dalton, Ph.D., M.D., is CEO of M2Gen, a national biotech- nology subsidiary of Moffitt Cancer Center. Until July 2012, Dr. Dalton served as president, CEO, and center director of Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. A nationally renowned cancer researcher, physician, and health policy expert, Dr. Dalton has dedicated his career to the study and development of the most effective approaches to cancer research and care. Dr. Dalton currently serves as the president of the Association of American Cancer Institutes and is chair of the Science Policy & Legisla- tive Affairs Committee of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). In addition, he has served on the NCI Board of Scientific Advisors as well as multiple scientific advisory boards at cancer centers and research foundations. Dr. Dalton is also interested in the development of personalized cancer care and patient-centered outcomes research. Moffitt's Total Cancer Care is an approach to enhance access to evidence-based, personalized cancer treatments and information or decision tools for patients and clinicians. Total Cancer Care is one of the largest cancer tumor biorepositories and data warehouses in the United States dedicated to use in the development of personalized medicine.

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APPENDIX B 115 Dr. Dalton received his Ph.D. in toxicology and medical life sciences and his M.D. from Indiana University. He completed his internship in internal medicine at Indiana University and his residency in medicine and fellowships in oncology and clinical pharmacology at the University of Arizona. Prior to accepting the position as CEO and center director at Moffitt, Dr. Dalton was the dean of the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona. Gwen Darien, a cancer survivor herself, brings a wealth of personal and professional experiences to her position as a director of The Pathways Project, an organization that creates radically inclusive, accessible com- munities that put people at the center of health care. Ms. Darien served as executive director of the Samuel Waxman Cancer Research Foundation (SWCRF). In this role, she was committed to developing collaborations across all segments of the cancer community to translate cancer research discoveries from the bench to the clinic. Prior to joining SWCRF, Ms. Darien was editor-in-chief of CR maga- zine and founding director of the American Association for Cancer Research Survivor and Patient Advocacy Program, where she led initiatives to foster mutually beneficial and enduring partnerships among leaders of the cancer survivor, patient advocacy, and scientific communities through collabora- tions, communications, and education. Ms. Darien was previously the editor-in-chief of MAMM, a consumer magazine dedicated to women with breast and reproductive cancer. During Ms. Darien's tenure, MAMM won international acclaim for its coverage of survivorship, health disparities, and controversies in women's cancers and health care policy. Ms. Darien is chair of the NCI Director's Consumer Liaison Group. She is a member of the board of directors of ENACCT (Education Network to Advance Cancer Clinical Trials) and the Strategic Advisory Group (SAGE) of the Center for Patient Partnerships at the University of Wisconsin. She has served on the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Health, Genetics, and Society and the faculties of the AACR-ASCO Methods in Clinical Cancer Research Workshop, the Accelerating Anti-cancer Agent Development and Validation Workshop, and the advisory board of the Health Advocacy Program at Sarah Lawrence College. She has received several awards for her work, including the Avon Foundation Media Leadership Award, the LYMPHAdvocate Award from the Cure for Lymphoma Foundation, and the Sisters' Network Media Leadership Award. She is a graduate of Sarah Lawrence College.

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116 INFORMATICS NEEDS AND CHALLENGES IN CANCER RESEARCH Lynn Etheredge, an independent consultant on health care and social policy issues, works with the Rapid Learning Project at George Washington University. His career started at the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB). During the Nixon and Ford administrations, he was OMB's principal analyst for Medicare and Medicaid and led its staff work on national health insurance proposals. Mr. Etheredge headed OMB's pro- fessional health staff in the Carter and Reagan administrations. Later, he was a coauthor of the Jackson Hole Group's proposals for health care reform and a founding member of the National Academy of Social Insurance. His recent publications include "Medicare's Future: Cancer Care"; "Medicaid: A Future Leader in Effective, High-Quality Care" (an open letter with 12 coauthors); "A Rapid-Learning Health System" (Health Affairs special issue); "Administering a Medicaid + Tax Credits Initiative"; and "Technologies of Health Policy." He is author of more than 85 publications and is a graduate of Swarthmore College. Brandon Hayes-Lattin, M.D., is senior medical adviser for the Lance Armstrong Foundation, an associate professor of medicine in the Divi- sion of Hematology and Medical Oncology at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), and the director of the OHSU Knight Cancer Insti- tute's Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Oncology Program. His clinical background is in the management of hematologic malignancies and the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, as a young adult cancer survivor himself and a physician caring for many young adults with hematologic malignancies, Dr. Hayes-Lattin has taken a leadership role in the development of the discipline of adolescent and young adult oncol- ogy. He served as the inaugural medical co-chair of the Lance Armstrong Foundation's LIVESTRONG Young Adult Alliance, a coalition of over 150 member organizations leading efforts to research and serve AYA can- cer patients. Working in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute, the LIVESTRONG Young Adult Alliance established the Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Progress Review Group, publishing recommenda- tions and strategic plans for the advancement of AYA Oncology. He cur- rently writes a blog for LIVESTRONG. Dr. Hayes-Lattin also serves on the Expert Advisory Panel to the AYA Committee of the Children's Oncology Group and the Federal Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women, and he advises many advocacy groups on the medical needs of cancer patients.

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APPENDIX B 117 Bradford (Brad) Hesse, Ph.D., is chief of the NCI Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch. For more than two decades, Dr. Hesse has been conducting research in the interdisciplinary fields of social cogni- tion, health communication, health informatics, and user- centered design. He was recruited to NCI in 2003 and has since been focusing on bringing the power of evidence-based health communication technologies to bear on the problem of eliminating death and suffering from cancer. He continues to direct the Health Information National Trends Survey, a biennial general population survey aimed at monitoring the public's use of health informa- tion during a period of enhanced capacity at the crest of the information revolution; he also serves as program director for the Centers of Excellence in Cancer Communication Research, a cutting-edge research initiative aimed at expanding the knowledge base underlying effective cancer communication strategies. Dr. Hesse has authored or coauthored more than 150 publica- tions, including peer-reviewed journal articles, technical reports, books, and book chapters. In 2009, his coauthored book entitled Making Data Talk: Communicating Public Health Data to the Public, Policy Makers, and the Press was named Book of the Year by the American Journal of Nursing. Dr. Hesse received his degree in social psychology from the University of Utah in 1988 with an accompanying internship in the nascent field of medical informatics and later served as a postdoctoral fellow in the Depart- ment of Social and Decision Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University. Leroy Hood, M.D., Ph.D., is president and co-founder of the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle. Dr. Hood is a pioneer in systems approaches to biology and medicine. His research has focused on the study of molecular immunology, biotechnology, and genomics. His professional career began at Caltech, where he and his colleagues developed the DNA sequencer and synthesizer and the protein synthesizer and sequencer--four instruments that paved the way for the successful mapping of the human genome and led to his receiving the 2011 prestigious Russ Prize, awarded by the National Academy of Engineering. A pillar in the biotechnology field, Dr. Hood has played a role in founding more than 14 biotechnology companies, includ- ing Amgen, Applied Biosystems, Darwin, The Accelerator, and Integrated Diagnostics. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine, one of only 15 people in the world to be elected to all three academies. In addi- tion to having published more than 700 peer-reviewed articles, he has coauthored textbooks in biochemistry, immunology, molecular biology,

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118 INFORMATICS NEEDS AND CHALLENGES IN CANCER RESEARCH and genetics, as well as a popular book on the human genome project, The Code of Codes. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Lasker Award, the Kyoto Prize, and the Heinz Award in Technology. Dr. Hood has also received 17 honorary degrees from prestigious universities in the United States and other countries and holds 36 patents. Jason Hwang, M.D., M.B.A., is an internal medicine physician and co- founder and executive director of Health Care at the Innosight Institute, a nonprofit social innovation think tank based in Mountain View, Califor- nia. Together with Professor Clayton M. Christensen of Harvard Business School and the late Jerome H. Grossman of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, he is coauthor of The Innovator's Prescription: A Disruptive Solution for Health Care, the American College of Healthcare Executives 2010 Book of the Year, and recipient of the 2011 Health Service Journal Circle Prize for Inspiring Innovation. Previously, Dr. Hwang taught as chief resident and clinical instructor at the University of California, Irvine, where he received multiple recogni- tions for his clinical work. He has also served as a clinician with the South- ern California Kaiser Permanente Medical Group and the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Long Beach, California. Dr. Hwang received his B.S. and M.D. from the University of Michigan and his M.B.A. from Harvard Business School. Kris Joshi, Ph.D., is global vice president for Oracle's health care product portfolio. Dr. Joshi helped launch the Health Sciences Global Business Unit within Oracle, and in his prior role as head of Strategy and Operations, he led the business unit's growth strategy, including the acquisitions of Relsys and Phase Forward. He oversees a broad product portfolio that covers ana- lytics, health information exchange, care management, and "convergence" solutions for personalized medicine and translational research that serve both health care and life sciences customers. Dr. Joshi brings deep experience across business and technology strat- egy, M&A, operations, sales, marketing, and business transformation. Prior to Oracle, he served in senior strategy roles in IBM's Global Sales and Dis- tribution Organization, where he helped shape IBM's global distribution and emerging markets strategies. Prior to IBM, Dr. Joshi spent several years as a consultant with McKinsey and Company, where he served Fortune 500 clients in the banking, media, health care, and life sciences industries on business strategy issues.

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APPENDIX B 119 Dr. Joshi has a long-standing personal commitment to help bridge the gap between the social and business worlds through entrepreneurship, innovation, and publicprivate partnerships. He has championed numerous initiatives aimed at leveraging technology to improve the quality, safety, and affordability of health care globally. Dr. Joshi holds a B.S. in mathematics from Caltech and a Ph.D. in astrophysics from MIT. Marcia Kean, M.B.A., has built Feinstein Kean Healthcare's national role in the life sciences since the firm's inception 25 years ago. She served as the CEO of the firm from 2002 to 2011 and became chair of Strategic Initia- tives in 2011. Ms. Kean has more than 35 years of biomedical industry experience, in support of hundreds of start-ups and publicly traded companies, as well as large-scale national and international science and technology-driven pro- grams. She has decades of business operating experience as well as knowl- edge of the development and implementation of publicprivate projects undertaken by multistakeholder ecosystems. In 2003, Ms. Kean founded the first molecular medicine communica- tions practice in the country. She has served as an adviser to the Personal- ized Medicine Coalition (PMC) since its inception and was awarded that organization's first Distinguished Service Award in 2006. She has served on the planning committee for the HarvardPartners Center for Person- alized Genetic Medicine annual personalized medicine conference since its inception. She served in 2006 as a member of the Personalized Health Care Expert Panel convened by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) of HHS. She chairs the Advisory Com- mittee of Turning the Tide Against Cancer Through Sustained Medical Innovation, a national conference on science and policy co-hosted by the Personalized Medicine Coalition, American Association for Cancer Research, and Feinstein Kean Healthcare. Ms. Kean holds an M.B.A. in finance from New York University and a B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley. Kimary Kulig, Ph.D., M.P.H., is vice president of clinical and transla- tional outcomes research at the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). Her primary responsibility is to direct the ongoing development and advancement of the NCCN Oncology Outcomes Database (NCCN Database) and other outcomes research programs. The NCCN Database is

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120 INFORMATICS NEEDS AND CHALLENGES IN CANCER RESEARCH a set of databases with comprehensive data, including clinical outcomes, on five major tumor types for thousands of patients treated at NCCN member institutions. Prior to joining NCCN, Dr. Kulig worked for several years leading outcomes-based research in oncology at Pfizer, Inc., most recently as senior director and lead, Molecular Epidemiology Research, Oncology. In this role, she designed and conducted biomarker-linked outcomes research projects in support of multiple clinical development programs, including those involving companion diagnostics, at the global level. Prior to Dr. Kulig's appointment at Pfizer, Inc., she led an epidemiology and surveillance research program for the Arthritis Foundation, conducted public health research at the Columbia University Mailman School of Pub- lic Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and engaged in immunology research at Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons, the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology (London), and the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, Minnesota). Dr. Kulig holds a master's degree in public health with an emphasis in epidemiology from the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and earned her doctorate in immunology and molecular oncology from the New York University School of Medicine. Mia A. Levy, M.D., Ph.D., is director of cancer clinical informatics for the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and assistant professor of biomedi- cal informatics and medicine. Dr. Levy received her undergraduate degree in bioengineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1997 and her medical doctorate from Rush University in 2003. She then spent six years at Stanford University for postgraduate training in internal medicine and medical oncology while completing her Ph.D. in biomedical informatics. She joined the faculty at Vanderbilt as an assistant professor of biomedi- cal informatics and medicine in August 2009. She is a practicing medical oncologist specializing in the treatment of breast cancer. Dr. Levy's research interests include biomedical informatics methods to support the continuum of cancer care and cancer research. Current research projects include informatics methods for (1) image-based cancer treatment response assessment using quantitative imaging, (2) clinical decision support for treatment prioritization of molecular subtypes of cancer, (3) protocol-based plan management, and (4) learning cancer systems.

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APPENDIX B 121 Allen S. Lichter, M.D., is CEO of ASCO, the world's leading professional organization, representing nearly 30,000 physicians and health profession- als in oncology. Prior to joining ASCO in 2006, Dr. Lichter was at the University of Michigan in two significant leadership roles. He served as chair and profes- sor of radiation oncology from 1984 to 1998 and as dean of the Medical School from 1998 to 2006. Dr. Lichter was named the first Isadore Lampe Professor of Radiation Oncology, an endowed chair, and also was the Newman Family Professor of Radiation Oncology. Prior to his tenure at the University of Michigan, Dr. Lichter was direc- tor of the Radiation Therapy Section of NCI's Radiation Oncology Branch. Dr. Lichter's research and development of three-dimensional treatment planning led to a Gold Medal from the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. In 2002, he was elected to the Institute of Medi- cine of the National Academies of Sciences. As a member of ASCO since 1980, Dr. Lichter has assumed many prominent roles in the Society, including president (19981999) and founding chair of ASCO's Conquer Cancer Foundation Board. Dr. Lichter earned a bachelor's degree (1968) and a medical degree (1972) from the University of Michigan. He trained in radiation oncology at the University of California, San Francisco, before joining the faculty at Johns Hopkins University and later NCI. Daniel R. Masys, M.D., is affiliate professor of biomedical and health informatics at the University of Washington (UW), Seattle. An honors graduate of Princeton University and the Ohio State University College of Medicine, he completed postgraduate training in internal medicine, hema- tology, and medical oncology at the University of California, San Diego, and the Naval Regional Medical Center, San Diego. His more than 30-year career in biomedical informatics prior to joining UW included leadership positions at NCI and NLM and faculty appointments at the University of California, San Diego, and the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, where he was emeritus professor and chair of the Department of Biomedi- cal Informatics. Dr. Masys is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and a fellow and past president of the American College of Medical Informatics. He was a founding associ- ate editor of the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association and

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122 INFORMATICS NEEDS AND CHALLENGES IN CANCER RESEARCH has received numerous awards including the NIH Director's Award and the U.S. Surgeon General's Exemplary Service Medal. Deven McGraw, J.D., L.L.M., is director of the Health Privacy Project at the Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT). The project is focused on developing and promoting workable privacy and security protections for electronic personal health information. Ms. McGraw is active in efforts to advance the adoption and imple- mentation of health information technology and electronic health infor- mation exchange to improve health care. She was one of three people appointed by Kathleen Sebelius, secretary of HHS, to serve on the Health Information Technology (HIT) Policy Committee, a federal advisory com- mittee established in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. She chairs the Committee's Privacy and Security Workgroup (the "Tiger Team") and serves as a member of its Meaningful Use and Informa- tion Exchange Workgroups. She also served on the Policy Steering Com- mittee of the eHealth Initiative and now serves on its Leadership Council. She is also on the Steering Group of the Markle Foundation's Connecting for Health multistakeholder initiative. Ms. McGraw has a strong background in health care policy. Prior to joining CDT, she was the chief operating officer of the National Partnership for Women & Families, providing strategic direction and oversight for all of the organization's core program areas, including the promotion of initia- tives to improve health care quality. Ms. McGraw also was an associate in the public policy group at Patton Boggs, LLP and in the health care group at Ropes & Gray. She served as deputy legal counsel to the governor of Massachusetts and taught in the Federal Legislation Clinic at Georgetown University Law Center. Ms. McGraw graduated magna cum laude from the University of Maryland. She earned her J.D., magna cum laude, and her L.L.M. from Georgetown University Law Center and was executive editor of the Georgetown Law Journal. She also has a master of public health degree from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Hygiene and Public Health. John Mendelsohn, M.D., was president of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston from 1996 until 2011. Under his direction, M.D. Anderson assumed a leadership role in translational and clinical cancer research and was named the top cancer hospital in the United States for 8 of the past 10 years in the U.S. News & World Report "America's

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APPENDIX B 123 Best Hospitals" survey. Currently, Dr. Mendelsohn is the co-director of the Khalifa Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy at M.D. Anderson. Previ- ously, he chaired the Department of Medicine at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and he began his career at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), in La Jolla, where he was founding director of its cancer center. Dr. Mendelsohn and his collaborators pioneered the concept of therapy to target the products of genes that cause cancer. His team's innova- tive research on inhibition of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase led to production and investigation of monoclonal antibody C225 (Erbitux), which is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for colon cancer and head and neck cancer. He served as found- ing editor-in-chief of Clinical Cancer Research, has published more than 250 articles and reviews, and has received many prizes and awards. Dr. Mendelsohn is chair of the IOM's National Cancer Policy Forum. He has directed postdoctoral programs that trained many dozens of medical oncologists and scientists. He is an active board member of several Houston area organizations, including the Houston Grand Opera, the BioHouston, and the Center for Houston's Future. Farzad Mostashari, M.D., Sc.M., is national coordinator for health information technology within the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) at HHS. Farzad joined ONC in July 2009. Previously, he served at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene as assistant commissioner for the Primary Care Information Project, where he facilitated the adoption of prevention- oriented health information technology by more than 1,500 providers in underserved communities. Dr. Mostashari also led the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)funded New York City Center of Excel- lence in Public Health Informatics and an AHRQ-funded project focused on quality measurement at the point of care. Prior to this, he established the Bureau of Epidemiology Services at the New York City Department of Health, charged with providing epidemiologic and statistical expertise and data for decision making to the health department. He completed his graduate training at the Harvard School of P ublic Health and Yale Medical School, his internal medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, and completed the CDC's Epidemic Intelligence Service. He was one of the lead investigators in the outbreaks of West Nile virus and anthrax in New York City and was among the first developers of real-time electronic disease surveillance systems nationwide.

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124 INFORMATICS NEEDS AND CHALLENGES IN CANCER RESEARCH Spyro Mousses, Ph.D., is professor at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), in Phoenix, Arizona. His scientific background and exper- tise include developing platform genomic and computational technologies and he recently has focused on strategically integrating multiple technolo- gies and scientific resources to engineer innovative solutions that can sup- port drug discovery, translational research, clinical drug development, and personalized medicine. Toward the goal of integrating technologies across sectors into unifying solutions, Dr. Mousses has lead multi disciplinary publicprivate collaborations and developed partnerships with major cor- porations in the pharmaceutical, biotech, life sciences, and IT industries. He is also a mission-driven entrepreneur and has served as chief scientific officer and co-founder of Systems Medicine Inc. (acquired by Cell Thera- peutics Inc.) and MedTrust OnLine Inc. (acquired by Annai Systems Inc.). Dr. Mousses received his B.Sc. (pharmacology and toxicology), M.Sc., and Ph.D. (molecular pathogenesis and genetics of cancer) from the University of Toronto. He served as staff scientist at the National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH, where he led a program in cancer genome scan- ning and high-throughput technology development. He joined TGen at its inception as one of the founding scientists, contributing to building and directing the Cancer Drug Development Laboratory and the Pharmaceuti- cal Genomics Division. Most recently, he was appointed director of the Center for BioIntelligence and was named vice president in the Office of Innovation. Sharon Murphy, M.D., joined the Institute of Medicine as a scholar- in-residence in October 2008, coming to the District of Columbia from Texas, where she was inaugural director of the Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute and professor of pediatrics at the University of Texas Health S cience Center at San Antonio from 2002 to 2008. From 1988 to 2002, Dr. Murphy was chief of the Division of Hematology-Oncology at Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago and professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University School of Medicine, where she also led the program in pediatric oncology at the Robert H. Lurie Cancer Center. From 1974 to 1988, Dr. Murphy was on the faculty at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis. A pediatric oncologist and clinical cancer researcher, Dr. Murphy has devoted the past 35 years to improving cure rates for childhood cancer, particularly childhood lymphomas and leukemias. She was chair of the Pediatric Oncology Group from 1993 to 2001. She has been recognized

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APPENDIX B 125 for her achievements by the Association of Community Cancer Centers (2001), the Distinguished Service Award for Scientific Leadership from ASCO (2005), and the Distinguished Career Award from the American Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (2009). The author of more than 220 original articles, reviews, and book chapters, Dr. Murphy has also served on numerous editorial boards. She has been a member of the boards of directors of the American Cancer Society, AACR, the American Society of Hematology, and ASCO, and she has been an adviser to NCI and FDA. She earned her bachelor of science degree from the University of Wisconsin (1965) and her medical degree, cum laude, from Harvard Medi- cal School (1969). She completed postdoctoral training in pediatrics at the University of Colorado (19691971) and in pediatric hematology and oncology at the University of Pennsylvania (19711973). Steven Piantadosi, M.D., Ph.D., is director of the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Dr. Piantadosi's role is to lead the medical center's programs in cancer research, treatment, and education; enhance academic activities related to cancer; and bring together Cedars-Sinai's cancer physicians and researchers for innovative collaborations. Prior to joining Cedars-Sinai in December 2007, Dr. Piantadosi was professor of oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of biostatistics at the Sidney Kimmel Compre- hensive Cancer Center. He also was a professor of biostatistics and of epidemiology at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. After earning his medical degree from the University of North Carolina and his doctor- ate in bio mathematics from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Dr. Piantadosi became a senior staff fellow at NCI. Dr. Piantadosi is one of the world's leading experts in the design and analysis of clinical trials for cancer research. In addition to advising both FDA and industry, he has served on external advisory boards for NIH and other prominent cancer programs and centers. The author of more than 230 peer-reviewed scientific articles, Dr. Piantadosi has published extensively on research results, clinical appli- cations, and trial methodology. While his papers have contributed to many diverse areas of oncology, he has also collaborated on studies in disciplines outside cancer including lung disease, AIDS, and degenerative neurologi- cal disease. Dr. Piantadosi is the author of Clinical Trials: A Methodologic

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126 INFORMATICS NEEDS AND CHALLENGES IN CANCER RESEARCH Perspective, which is widely considered a classic textbook for clinical trials. He has taught young investigators extensively in his own course, the Uni- versity of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), STAR program, and through international venues such as the AACR-ASCO Workshop on Methods in Clinical Cancer Research. Dr. Piantadosi has held leadership roles with national cooperative oncology groups and has been a member of numerous clinical trial monitoring committees. Bradley H. Pollock, M.P.H., Ph.D., is professor and the founding chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics in the School of Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA). He holds adjunct professorships at the University of Texas School of Public Health, the College of Business at the University of Texas at San Antonio, and the Department of Statistics at Texas A&M Univer- sity. In 2001, he started the Center for Epidemiology and Biostatistics at UTHSCSA, which evolved into the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics in 2006. Dr. Pollock served as a cooperative group statistician for the Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) and the successor Children's Oncology Group (COG). He has been responsible for the biostatistical management of Phase I through Phase III cancer clinical trials, correlative biology studies, interventional trials, and numerous observational studies. He has served continuously as principal investigator of the Community Clinical O ncology Program (CCOP) Research Base grant for POG and COG since 1995, chair of the POG Epidemiology Committee from 1991 to 2000, and chair of the POG and COG Cancer Control Committees from 1995 to 2003. Dr. Pollock serves as director of the Biostatistics and Informatics Shared Resource for the P30-funded NCI-designated Cancer Therapy & Research Center (CTRC). He also directs two cores for the NIH-funded Clinical & Translational Science Award (CTSA) at UTHSCSA: the Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Research Design Core and the Biomedical I nformatics Core. Dr. Pollock is the current vice chair and chair-elect of the CTSA Biostatistics/Epidemiology/Research Design Key Function Committee. In addition, he is president of the Association of Clinical Translational Statisticians. Dr. Pollock's research focuses on pediatric and adolescent oncology, with an emphasis on cancer epidemiology and cancer prevention and control research. He has served on numerous NIH grant review and other scientific committees.

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APPENDIX B 127 Dr. Pollock received his B.S. in biological sciences from the University of California, Irvine, and his M.P.H. and Ph.D. in epidemiology (minor in biostatistics) from the UCLA School of Public Health. George Poste, Ph.D., D.V.M., is chief scientist for the Complex Adaptive Systems Initiative (http://www.casi.asu.edu) at Arizona State University (ASU). From 2003 to 2009, he created and built the Biodesign Institute at ASU (http://www.biodesign.asu.edu). He serves on the board of directors of Monsanto, Exelixis, and Caris Life Sciences and the scientific advisory board of Synthetic G enomics. From 1992 to 1999, he was chief science and technology officer of SmithKline Beecham. In 2004 he was named R&D Scientist of the Year by R&D Magazine; in 2006, he received the Einstein award from the Global Business Leadership Council; and in 2009, he received the Scrip Lifetime Achieve- ment award. Dr. Poste is a fellow of the Royal Society (UK), the Royal College of Pathologists, and the Academy of Medical Sciences (UK); a distinguished fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University; and a member of the Council for Foreign Relations and the IOM Forum on Microbial Threats. Mitchell D. Schnall, M.D., Ph.D., is an international leader in transla- tional biomedical and imaging research, working throughout his career across the interface between basic imaging science and clinical medicine to ensure effective integration of radiology research with other medical disci- plines. His work has led to fundamental changes in the imaging approaches to breast and prostate cancer, and he continues to have a significant influ- ence on emerging imaging technologies, including those in optical imaging. Dr. Schnall was elected group chair of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) in 2008, after having served as its deputy chair from 1999 through 2007. ACRIN is an NCI-sponsored cancer cooperative group that designs, conducts, and reports on multicenter clini- cal trials of imaging in cancer and conducts similar research in neurology and cardiovascular studies through non-NCI funding. Among the multiple ACRIN clinical studies under Dr. Schnall's direction are the National Lung Screening Trial, the Digital Mammography Imaging Screening Trial, and the National CT (computed tomography) Colonography Trial. Dr. Schnall is co-PI of the Center for Magnetic Resonance and Optical Imaging, an NIH-funded regional resource at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Schnall maintains active membership in the American Society for

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128 INFORMATICS NEEDS AND CHALLENGES IN CANCER RESEARCH Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, ASCO, and the Radiological Society of North America. He received his undergraduate, medical, and doctoral degrees from the University of Pennsylvania, where he has served on the faculty of the Radiology Department since 1991 and as full professor since 2002. Lawrence N. Shulman, M.D., is chief medical officer, senior vice presi- dent for medical affairs, and chief, Division of General Oncology, Depart- ment of Medical Oncology, at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI). He focuses his efforts on clinical services for both adult and pediatric care at DCFI and its partners, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Children's Hospital. Dr. Shulman has served as one of the component leaders through the DFCI strategic planning initiative. He is director of network development for Dana-FarberBrigham and Women's Cancer Center and oversees DFCI ambulatory oncology units at several regional sites. He is also physician leader for the development of clinical information systems for DFCI. He is chair of the ASCO Quality of Care Committee and a member of ASCO's Health Information Technology Workgroup. He is also a member of the ASCO Workgroup on Provider-Payer Initiatives. He is a member of the Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons and vice chair of its Quality Integration Committee. A specialist in the treatment of patients with breast cancer, his research includes the development of new cancer therapies. He works closely with Partners in Health, where he is senior adviser in oncology, helping to lead the development of a structured cancer program for its resource-limited health care sites in Rwanda, Malawi, and Haiti. He was the founding co- chair, together with Dr. Julio Frenk, dean of the Harvard School of Public Health, of the Global Task Force on Expanding Access to Cancer Care and Control in the Developing World, a Harvard-based, international task force committed to the improvement of cancer care worldwide. PauPaul J. Wallace, M.D., is senior vice president and director, Center for Comparative Effectiveness Research at The Lewin Group. Dr. Wallace is a board-certified physician in internal medicine and hematology and a researcher and lecturer on topics relating to comparative effectiveness research (CER), including evidence-based medicine practice and policy, performance improvement and measurement, clinical practice guideline

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APPENDIX B 129 development; population-based care and disease management, new technol- ogy assessment, and comparative assessment. He has participated on several IOM advisory committees; he currently serves as a member of the Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, and he chaired the committee that produced the recent report Primary Care and Public Health: Exploring Integration to Improve Population Health. He is vice chair of the board of directors for AcademyHealth and a board member of the eHealth Initiative. Dr. Wallace previously served on the National Advisory Committee for AHRQ; the Medical Coverage Advisory Committee, Center for Medi- care and Medicaid Services (CMS); and the Committee on Performance Measurement for the National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA). Before joining The Lewin Group in 2011, he was medical director for health and productivity management programs at Kaiser Permanente's national P ermanente Federation. He had served as a physician and admin- istrator with Kaiser for more than 20 years. Prior to his work at Kaiser, he taught clinical and basic sciences and investigated bone marrow function as a faculty member at the Oregon Health Sciences University. Dr. Wallace is a graduate of the University of Iowa School of Medicine and completed further training in internal medicine, hematology, and can- cer research at Strong Memorial Hospital and the University of Rochester.

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