Appendix A

Short Biographies of Committee Members

Peter Lee (Chair) is a corporate vice president of Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington. Prior to taking his position at Microsoft, Dr. Lee worked at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), where he was the founding director of the Transformational Convergence Technology Office. Prior to DARPA, Dr. Lee was a professor and the head of the Computer Science Department at Carnegie Mellon University. Peter Lee’s research contributions are in areas related to the foundations of software reliability, program analysis, security, and language design. A fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and former chair of the board of directors of the Computing Research Association, Peter Lee is called on in diverse venues as a contributor in research, education, and policy making. He conducted his doctoral studies at the University of Michigan.

Mark E. Dean is chief technology officer, IBM Middle East and Africa. He was previously a technical fellow and vice president, worldwide operations at IBM Research, and the vice president for Systems Research at IBM’s Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York, where he was responsible for the research and application of systems technologies spanning circuits to operating environments. During his career, Dr. Dean has held several engineering positions at IBM in the area of computer system hardware architecture and design. He has developed all types of computer systems, from embedded systems to supercomputers, including testing of the first gigahertz CMOS microprocessor, and he established the team that developed the Blue Gene supercomputer. He was also chief engineer for the development of the IBM PC/AT, ISA systems bus, PS/2 Model 70 and 80, and the color graphics adapter in the original IBM PC, and he holds three of the nine patents for the original IBM PC. One invention—the Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) “bus,” which permitted add-on devices like the keyboard, disk drives, and printers to be connected to the motherboard—earned election to the National Inventors Hall of Fame for Dean and colleague Dennis Moeller. Dr. Dean’s most recent awards include a National Institute of Science Outstanding Scientist Award, member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering, IEEE Fellow, the CCG Black Engineer of the Year, the NSBE Distinguished Engineer Award, the University of Tennessee COE Dougherty Award, and recipient of the Ronald H.



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Appendix A Short Biographies of Committee Members Peter Lee (Chair) is a corporate vice president of Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington. Prior to taking his position at Microsoft, Dr. Lee worked at the Defense Advanced Research Proj- ects Agency (DARPA), where he was the founding director of the Transformational Convergence Technology Office. Prior to DARPA, Dr. Lee was a professor and the head of the Computer Science Department at Carnegie Mellon University. Peter Lee’s research contributions are in areas related to the foundations of software reliability, program analysis, security, and language design. A fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and former chair of the board of directors of the Com- puting Research Association, Peter Lee is called on in diverse venues as a contributor in research, education, and policy making. He conducted his doctoral studies at the University of Michigan. Mark E. Dean is chief technology officer, IBM Middle East and Africa. He was previously a techni- cal fellow and vice president, worldwide operations at IBM Research, and the vice president for Systems Research at IBM’s Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York, where he was responsible for the research and application of systems technologies spanning circuits to operating environments. During his career, Dr. Dean has held several engineering positions at IBM in the area of computer system hardware architecture and design. He has developed all types of com- puter systems, from embedded systems to supercomputers, including testing of the first gigahertz CMOS microprocessor, and he established the team that developed the Blue Gene supercomputer. He was also chief engineer for the development of the IBM PC/AT, ISA systems bus, PS/2 Model 70 and 80, and the color graphics adapter in the original IBM PC, and he holds three of the nine patents for the original IBM PC. One invention—the Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) “bus,” which permitted add-on devices like the keyboard, disk drives, and printers to be connected to the motherboard—earned election to the National Inventors Hall of Fame for Dean and colleague Dennis Moeller. Dr. Dean’s most recent awards include a National Institute of Science Outstanding Scientist Award, member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering, IEEE Fellow, the CCG Black Engineer of the Year, the NSBE Distinguished Engi- neer Award, the University of Tennessee COE Dougherty Award, and recipient of the Ronald H. 24

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25 APPENDIX A Brown American Innovators Award. Dr. Dean was appointed an IBM Fellow in 1995, IBM’s highest technical honor. He is a member of the IBM Academy of Technology. Dr. Dean has more than 40 patents or patents pending. He received a BSEE degree from the University of Tennessee in 1979, an MSEE degree from Florida Atlantic University in 1982, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1992. Deborah L. Estrin is a professor of computer science at UCLA and is director of the NSF-funded Center for Embedded Networked Sensing (CENS). Professor Estrin received her Ph.D. (1985) in computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, her M.S. (1982) from MIT, and her B.S. (1980) from the University of California, Berkeley. Before joining UCLA she was a member of the University of Southern California Computer Science Department from 1986 through the middle of 2000. In 1987, Professor Estrin received the National Science Foundation‘s Presidential Young Investigator Award for her research in network interconnection and security. During the subsequent 10 years much of her research focused on the design of network and routing protocols for very large, global networks, self-configuring protocol mechanisms for scalability and robustness, and tools and methods for designing and studying large-scale networks. Since the late 1990s Professor Estrin has been collaborating with her colleagues and students to develop protocols and systems architectures needed to realize rapidly deployable and robustly operating networks of many hundreds of physically embedded devices, e.g., sensor networks. She is particularly interested in the application of spatially and temporally dense embedded sensors to environmental monitor- ing. Dr. Estrin has been a co-principal investigator on many NSF- and DARPA-funded projects. She chaired a 1997-1998 ISAT study on sensor networks and the 2001 NRC study on networked embedded computing which produced the report Embedded, Everywhere. Professor Estrin serves on the advisory committees for the NSF Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) and Environmental Research and Education (ERE) Directorates. She is a fellow of the ACM, AAAS, and IEEE. She has served on numerous panels for the NSF, National Academy of Sciences/NRC, and DARPA. She has also served as an editor for the ACM/IEEE Transactions on Networks and as a program committee member for many networking-related conferences, including Sigcomm and Infocom. She was general co-chair for the first ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems, SenSys 2003. She was also an associate editor for the new ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks and was a member of the National Research Council’s Computer Science and Telecom- munications Board from 2004 to 2011. James T. Kajiya is currently a director of research at Microsoft Corporation. From 1994 to 1997, Dr. Kajiya was a senior researcher at Microsoft Research, where he built and led the graphics group. His recent work has focused on very-high-quality computer graphics. Most recently, Dr. Kajiya has returned to graphics hardware design. He was the principal architect on Talisman, a low-cost hardware architecture for very-high-quality real-time three-dimensional graphics. Dr. Kajiya also served as the principal investigator on a joint research project with IBM that produced an implementation of Prolog yielding a speed of 0.9 megalips and a new object-oriented systems programming language called FITH. In other work, he explored parallel ray tracing on the IBM RP3 and specified software architecture for scientific visualization in the IBM SVS, which became the Power Visualization System. In joint work with TRW, he has served as architect for super- computers oriented toward military signal- and image-processing tasks. Dr. Kajiya has served on the external advisory board of the Defense Mapping Agency, on the National Neurocircuitry Database Committee for the National Academy of Sciences and Institute of Medicine, and on the

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26 CONTINUING INNOVATION IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SIGGRAPH executive committee. He received the SIGGRAPH Technical Achievement Award in 1991 and served as the technical program chair for SIGGRAPH 93. In 1997, Dr. Kajiya, along with Dr. Timothy Kay, received an Academy Award (technical certificate) for work on rendering hair and fur. In 2002 he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering for contributions to formal and practical methods of computer image generation. He received a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Utah. Prabhakar Raghavan is vice president of engineering at Google, Inc. He is also a consulting profes- sor of computer science at Stanford University. His research interests include text and Web mining and algorithm design, and he has authored two textbooks on the subjects. Dr. Raghavan received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the ACM and the IEEE. Prior to joining Google he was head of Yahoo! Labs and before that, senior vice-president and chief technology officer at Verity; before that he held a number of technical and managerial positions at IBM Research. Andrew J. Viterbi is a co-founder and retired vice chair and chief technical officer of QUALCOMM Incorporated. He spent equal portions of his career in industry, having previously co-founded Linkabit Corporation, and in academia as a professor in the Schools of Engineering and Applied Science, first at UCLA and then at UCSD, at which he is now a professor emeritus. He is currently president of the Viterbi Group, a technical advisory and investment company. He also serves as Presidential Chair Visiting Professor at the University of Southern California and as a distinguished visiting professor at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. Dr. Viterbi has received numerous honors both in the United States and internationally. Among these are seven honorary doctorates, from universities in Canada, Israel, Italy, and the United States; the Marconi International Fellow- ship Award; the IEEE Alexander Graham Bell, the Claude Shannon, and the James Clerk Maxwell Awards; the NEC C&C Award; the Eduard Rhein Foundation Award; the Christopher Columbus Medal, the Franklin Medal, and the Robert Noyes Semiconductor Industry Award; the Millennium Laureate Award; and the IEEE’s highest award, the Medal of Honor. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has received an honorary title from the president of Italy and the National Medal of Science from the president of the United States. Dr. Viterbi serves on boards and committees of numerous nonprofit institutions, including the University of Southern California, MIT (Visiting Committee for Bioengineering), Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, Burnham Institute for Medical Research, and Scripps Translational Science Institute, and he is the past chair of the Computer and Information Sciences Section of the National Academy of Sciences.