Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Charles E. Kolb, Chair, is president and chief executive officer of Aerodyne Research, Inc., in Billerica, Massachusetts. His principle research interests have included atmospheric and environmental chemistry, combustion chemistry, and the chemical physics of rocket and aircraft exhaust plumes, and he has published over 200 archival journal articles and book chapters on these topics. He has served on several National Aeronautics and Space Administration panels dealing with environmental issues as well as on numerous NRC committees and boards dealing with atmospheric and environmental chemistry. Dr. Kolb also served on the NRC’s Committee on Review and Evaluation of the Army Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (member 1993-1998, vice- chair, 1998-2000), on the Committee on Review and Evaluation of Chemical Events at Army Chemical Demilitarization Facilities (chair, 2001-2002), and on the Committee on Monitoring at Chemical Agent Disposal Facilities (chair, 2004-2005), which examined ambient air monitoring at such facilities. He subsequently served on the NRC Standing Committee on Chemical Demilitarization (2005-2010). Dr. Kolb has also been appointed a national associate of the National Academies. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Chemical Society, the American Geophysical Union, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Optical Society of America. Dr. Kolb graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a B.S. in chemical physics and from Princeton University with an M.A. and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry.

Jesse L. Beauchamp, NAS, is Mary and Charles Ferkel Professor of Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology. Beginning with the first development of ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy (Ph.D. thesis, Harvard, 1967), Professor Beauchamp has been involved with the development and application of mass spectrometry and other spectroscopic methods to a wide range of scientific investigations over the past 46 years. Major scientific contributions have involved the development of new instruments and techniques for studies of the structures, reaction dynamics, and properties of organic, inorganic, and biological molecules and ions in the gas phase. Current research efforts include development of novel reagents and methods for proteomics (e.g., cross-linking reagents and stable isotope labels), studies of the detailed mechanism of electron capture and electron transfer dissociation, investigations of reaction dynamics at gas-liquid interfaces, studies of the structure and reaction dynamics of small molecular clusters, development of instrumentation for in situ elemental and chemical analysis on Mars, and



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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Charles E. Kolb, Chair, is president and chief executive officer of Aerodyne Research, Inc., in Billerica, Massachusetts. His principle research interests have included atmospheric and environmental chemistry, combustion chemistry, and the chemical physics of rocket and aircraft exhaust plumes, and he has published over 200 archival journal articles and book chapters on these topics. He has served on several National Aeronautics and Space Administration panels dealing with environmental issues as well as on numerous NRC committees and boards dealing with atmospheric and environmental chemistry. Dr. Kolb also served on the NRC's Committee on Review and Evaluation of the Army Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (member 1993-1998, vice- chair, 1998-2000), on the Committee on Review and Evaluation of Chemical Events at Army Chemical Demilitarization Facilities (chair, 2001-2002), and on the Committee on Monitoring at Chemical Agent Disposal Facilities (chair, 2004-2005), which examined ambient air monitoring at such facilities. He subsequently served on the NRC Standing Committee on Chemical Demilitarization (2005-2010). Dr. Kolb has also been appointed a national associate of the National Academies. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Chemical Society, the American Geophysical Union, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Optical Society of America. Dr. Kolb graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a B.S. in chemical physics and from Princeton University with an M.A. and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry. Jesse L. Beauchamp, NAS, is Mary and Charles Ferkel Professor of Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology. Beginning with the first development of ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy (Ph.D. thesis, Harvard, 1967), Professor Beauchamp has been involved with the development and application of mass spectrometry and other spectroscopic methods to a wide range of scientific investigations over the past 46 years. Major scientific contributions have involved the development of new instruments and techniques for studies of the structures, reaction dynamics, and properties of organic, inorganic, and biological molecules and ions in the gas phase. Current research efforts include development of novel reagents and methods for proteomics (e.g., cross-linking reagents and stable isotope labels), studies of the detailed mechanism of electron capture and electron transfer dissociation, investigations of reaction dynamics at gas-liquid interfaces, studies of the structure and reaction dynamics of small molecular clusters, development of instrumentation for in situ elemental and chemical analysis on Mars, and 137

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138 ASSESSMENT OF AGENT MONITORING STRATEGIES FOR BGCAPP AND PCAPP an examination of the chemistry of Titan's atmosphere and surface. Dr. Beauchamp was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1981. In addition to major awards from the American Chemical Society in 1981, 1999, and 2003, in 2007 he received the Distinguished Contribution Award from the American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Dr. Beauchamp received a B.S. in 1964 from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in 1967 from Harvard University. Robert A. Beaudet recently retired from the faculty of the University of Southern California. He received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Harvard University in 1962. From 1961 to 1963, he was a U.S. Army officer in the Chemical Branch and served at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a research scientist. He joined the faculty of the University of Southern California in 1962 and served continuously in the Department of Chemistry from that time. Most of his academic career has been devoted to research in molecular structure and molecular spectroscopy. He also has served on Department of Defense committees addressing both offensive and defensive aspects surrounding chemical and biological warfare agents. He was chair of an Army Science Board committee that addressed chemical detection and trace gas analysis. Dr. Beaudet served as a member of the NRC's Board on Army Science and Technology (BAST), as a member of the NRC Committee on Review of the Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel Disposal Program, and as a BAST liaison to the Committee on Review and Evaluation of the Army Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (Stockpile Committee). He was also the chair of an Air Force technical conference on chemical warfare decontamination and protection. Dr. Beaudet has participated in numerous studies by the National Research Council (NRC) dealing with chemical and biological sensor technologies and properties and detection of energetic materials. Over the past decade, he has chaired or served as a member on numerous NRC committees examining issues on the design of the Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternatives program pilot plant facilities in Colorado and Kentucky. Joan B. Berkowitz is currently managing director of Farkas Berkowitz and Company. She graduated from the University of Illinois with a Ph.D. in physical chemistry. Dr. Berkowitz has extensive experience in the area of environmental and hazardous waste management, a knowledge of available technologies for the cleanup of contaminated soils and groundwater, and a background in physical and electrochemistry. She has contributed to several EPA studies, been a consultant on remediation techniques, and assessed various destruction technologies. Dr. Berkowitz has written numerous publications on hazardous waste treatment and environmental subjects. She is an adjunct professor in the Graduate School of Management and Technology at the University of Maryland, University College, and winner of the 2004 Drazek Award for excellence in teaching. Dr. Berkowitz has for more than a decade been a participant on NRC studies concerning the chemical stockpile disposal program generally, and including the ACWA program for developing alternative disposal methods to incineration specifically. Among the 10 NRC studies on chemical demilitarization in which Dr. Berkowitz has participated since 1995 have been studies of the Committee to Review and Assess Developmental Issues Concerning the Metal Parts Treater Design for the Blue Grass Chemical Agent

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APPENDIX A 139 Destruction Pilot Plant and the Committee to Examine the Disposal of Activated Carbon from the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Systems at Chemical Agent Disposal Facilities. She is also currently a member of the standing Committee on Chemical Demilitarization. Hao Chen is an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry of Ohio University. His research in the chemical and life sciences in the area of organic and biological mass spectrometry focuses on how mass spectrometry can be applied at the interface between chemistry, physical organic chemistry, biology, and materials science. Examples include ion chemistry using ambient mass spectrometry for novel applications in bioanalytical chemistry. This involves developing methodologies for selective biomolecule detection in complex matrices. Other examples are analytical applications of ambient ion dissociation in proteomics and the chemical footprinting of proteins. Dr. Chen has authored or coauthored extensively in these areas since receiving his Ph.D. from Purdue University in 2005. He has also been a reviewer for a number of professional journals on analytical chemistry, mass spectrometry, and proteome research. Adrienne T. Cooper is an associate professor of biological and agricultural systems engineering at the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University. Previously, she was an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Temple University. She has 20 years of experience in chemical and environmental engineering, including process engineering, process and waste treatment development, and environmental regulation. Dr. Cooper conducts research in catalytic processes for environmental treatment and remediation and pollution prevention. She is a recipient of the National Science Foundation's CAREER award for her research on the development of photochemical reactors for water treatment and remediation. She has authored numerous publications and made presentations in her field. Dr. Cooper has served as a member of several National Research Council committees on issues pertaining to the disposal of stockpiled chemical agents and munitions and recovered (nonstockpile) chemical warfare materiel since 1999, including the 2009 report Assessment of Explosive Destruction Technologies for Specific Munitions at the Blue Grass and Pueblo Chemical Agent Disposal Pilot Plants. She holds a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of Florida and a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Tennessee. Facundo M. Fernndez is an associate professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and received his M.Sc. in chemistry from the College of Exact and Natural Sciences at Buenos Aires University in 1995 and his Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from the same University in 1999. In August 2000, he joined the research group of Richard Zare in the Department of Chemistry at Stanford University. His work focused on several aspects of Hadamard transform time-of-flight mass spectrometry with an emphasis on coupling this technique to capillary-format separation methods. In 2002, he joined the

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140 ASSESSMENT OF AGENT MONITORING STRATEGIES FOR BGCAPP AND PCAPP group of Vicki Wysocki in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Arizona, which was developing novel tandem mass spectrometers. In 2004 he joined the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is the author of over 70 peer-reviewed publications and numerous presentations at international conferences. He has received various awards, including the NSF CAREER award, the CETL/BP Teaching award, and the Ron A. Hites best paper award from the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, among others. His current research interests include the study and development of new methods and instrumentation in analytical mass spectrometry for forensics, metabolomics, and imaging. Robert D. Gibbons, IOM, is director of the Center for Health Statistics and professor of medicine, health studies, and psychiatry at the University of Chicago. He received his doctorate in statistics and psychometrics from the University of Chicago in 1981. He spent the first 30 years of his career at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) (1981- 2010), where he directed the Center for Health Statistics, a consortium of 15 statisticians working in both theoretical and applied areas of environmetrics, chemometrics, biometrics, and psychometrics. Support for his research comes from numerous grants and contracts from the NIH, NIMH, ONR, NCI, and the MacArthur Foundation. Recognition for his work includes a Young Scientist Award from the Office of Naval Research, a Research Scientist Award from NIH, the Harvard Award for lifetime contributions to psychiatric epidemiology and biostatistics, the Lucaks award for contributions to environmental statistics in the twentieth century, and two Youden prizes (2001 and 2006) from the American Statistical Association for statistical contributions to the field of chemistry. Dr. Gibbons is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. He has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed scientific papers and five books. Most recently Dr. Gibbons received the 2009 Outstanding Statistical Application Award from the American Statistical Association and the 2009 Distinguished Faculty Award from the University of Illinois at Chicago. In 2010 Dr. Gibbons retired from UIC and joined the faculty of the University of Chicago. John A. McLean is an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at Vanderbilt University and a faculty fellow in the Institute of Chemical Biology and the Institute of Integrative Biosystems Research and Education. His recent awards include an Excellence in Teaching award from the student members of the American Chemical Society, a Defense Threat Reduction Agency research award, an American Society for Mass Spectrometry research award, a Spectroscopy Society of Pittsburgh award, an R&D 100 Award, and the Bunsen-Kirchhoff Prize from the Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker. His research interests focus on the design, conceptualization, construction, and application of technologies for structural mass spectrometry, in particular for studies in structural proteomics, systems biology, biophysics, and bionanotechnology. Dr. McLean received a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan and in 2001 received a Ph.D. in chemistry from George Washington University.

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APPENDIX A 141 Max D. Morris is professor of statistics and industrial engineering at Iowa State University. His research addresses the statistical design of experiments, the theory and application of linear statistical models, and the theory and application of Gaussian process models. Recent areas of active research have included factor screening designs, design of spatial sampling plans, and pattern matching algorithms for forensic applications. He has done collaborative work with the scientific staff of Ames Laboratory. Dr. Morris was elected as a fellow of the American Statistical Association in 1994. In 2002, he received the Jerome Sacks Award for Cross-Disciplinary Research from the National Institute of Statistical Sciences. Dr. Morris received a B.S. in mathematics from Oklahoma State University in 1973 and an M.S. (1975) and a Ph.D. (1977) in statistics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Donald W. Murphy, NAE, now retired from Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, was director of the Applied Materials Research Department. He has since been a visiting researcher in the Chemistry Department of the University of California at Davis and an independent consultant. Dr. Murphy's research interests center on the synthesis of inorganic materials and on energy storage and conversion. A fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the American Chemical Society, the American Physical Society, and the National Academy of Engineering, Dr. Murphy has also published widely in his field. Dr. Murphy acquired familiarity with chemical agent demilitarization operations through prior service as a member of several NRC committees, including the committee that wrote the 2005 report Monitoring at Chemical Agent Disposal Facilities, which assessed the status and opportunities concerning ambient air monitoring at chemical demilitarization facilities. Dr. Murphy has a B.S. in chemistry from Harvey Mudd College and a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from Stanford University. C. Shane Reese is professor of statistics and associate chair at Brigham Young University. He received his Ph.D. in statistics from Texas A&M University. He is associate editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association. He also serves as chair of the association Council of Chapters Governing Board and as a member of the ASA Committee on Science and Public Affairs. He has also served as president of the Albuquerque and Utah chapters of the association. At Brigham Young he is a member of the faculty advisory committee (faculty senate) and university athletic advisory committee. Dr. Reese's research interests include Bayesian hierarchical models, Bayesian design and analysis of computer experiments, and Bayesian reliability and sports statistics. He has served as a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Biological Standoff Detection Systems. Lorenz R. Rhomberg is a principal at Gradient and an expert in quantitative risk assessment, including dose-response analysis, pharmacokinetic modeling, and probabilistic methods, with special experience in chlorinated solvents and endocrine- active agents. His experience encompasses work relating to a variety of regulatory

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142 ASSESSMENT OF AGENT MONITORING STRATEGIES FOR BGCAPP AND PCAPP programs, including CERCLA, FIFRA, and TSCA. Before joining Gradient, Dr. Rhomberg was on the faculty of the Harvard School of Public Health and was employed by the Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Rhomberg has been involved in policy development with a focus on current issues in the interpretation of toxicological data in human health risk assessment. He was recognized as Outstanding Practitioner of the Year by the Society for Risk Analysis in 2009. Dr. Rhomberg has a B.Sc. (with honors) in biology from Queen's University in Ontario, Canada, and a Ph.D. in population biology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Albert A. Viggiano, a research chemist with the Space Vehicles Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory, graduated from the University of California at Berkeley with a B.Sc. in chemistry (with highest honors) in 1976. He received his Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1980. Since graduate school, he has been active in the fields of atmospheric ion chemistry and kinetics, specifically in measuring ion molecule reaction rates of interest to atmospheric chemistry. Dr. Viggiano developed a chemical ionization mass spectrometer detection scheme for studying the thermal decomposition of N2O5 and was involved in the chemistry research that allowed sulfuric acid measurements in the atmosphere to be made. As a postdoctoral fellow in Heidelberg, Germany, he used these measurements to derive the first height profiles of sulfuric acid in the atmosphere and was involved in obtaining and analyzing in situ mass spectrometric data on the ion composition of the stratosphere. Since coming to the Air Force Research Laboratory in 1983 he has worked on measurements of ion kinetics related to a number of problems over a broad range of conditions. Dr. Viggiano has developed a technique that allows the effects of internal energy on the reactivity of gas- phase ionmolecule reactions to be studied. Using this technique, he has studied the effect of rotational energy on reactivity in more systems than have been studied anywhere. He has been instrumental in developing a technique to measure ionmolecule reactions at temperatures over 1000 K for the first time. The addition of a supersonic expansion source to the SIFDT allows for the measurement of mass selected cluster ions at thermal energy for the first time. A high-pressure turbulent flow tube is the first of its type for studying ionmolecule reactions. Most recently, he has developed a technique that allows for measuring the kinetics of numerous unique plasma reactions, including a heretofore previously undiscovered process, electron-catalyzed mutual neutralization. Dr. Viggiano has authored or coauthored over 320 papers and book chapters and has given 80 seminars at universities and laboratories and over 300 presentations at scientific meetings. He was lead author of the paper of the year at the Phillips Laboratory in 1993 and spent 2 months at the Max Planck Institut fr Kernphysik working with Frank Arnold under the Air Force Window on Europe program. He won the Loeser award in 1997 and has won the Air Force Basic Research Award and the Air Force Science and Technology Achievement Award.