Appendix A

Workshop Agenda and
List of Participants

Workshop on Climate Change Education in Formal Settings, K-14
August 31–September 1, 2011

The workshop will discuss climate change and climate science education in formal settings from Kindergarten through the first two years of college with the goal of building toward innovative practices based on a solid understanding of current trends. The workshop will begin with an investigation on student understanding of climate change and global warming and the state and quality of curricular materials for climate change and climate science in K-14. The broader context for climate change and climate science education will be explored through new generation national and state science standards and the current state of teacher understanding of, and preparation for climate change and climate science education. The workshop will end by featuring and discussing innovative approaches to climate change and climate science education that span into early college.

 

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

8:15–8:45 Individual Discussions with panelists and commissioned authors
(Breakfast available)
8:45–9:00 Welcome
Martin Storksdieck (Director, Board on Science Education) Jim Mahoney (Climate Change Education Roundtable Chair)


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Appendix A Workshop Agenda and List of Participants Workshop on Climate Change Education in Formal Settings, K-14 August 31September 1, 2011 The workshop will discuss climate change and climate science education in formal settings from Kindergarten through the first two years of college with the goal of building toward innovative practices based on a solid understanding of current trends. The workshop will begin with an inves- tigation on student understanding of climate change and global warming and the state and quality of curricular materials for climate change and climate science in K-14. The broader context for climate change and cli- mate science education will be explored through new generation national and state science standards and the current state of teacher understanding of, and preparation for climate change and climate science education. The workshop will end by featuring and discussing innovative approaches to climate change and climate science education that span into early college. Wednesday, August 31, 2011 8:158:45Individual Discussions with panelists and commissioned authors (Breakfast available) 8:459:00 Welcome Martin Storksdieck (Director, Board on Science Education) Jim Mahoney (Climate Change Education Roundtable Chair) 75

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76 CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION IN FORMAL SETTINGS, K-14 9:0010:15Session 1: Introduction and Keynote Remarks 9:009:15 Introduction: Goals for the Workshop Charles W. "Andy" Anderson (Workshop Committee Chair) 9:159:45Challenges and Opportunities in Climate Change Education Danny Edelson (National Geographic Society) Formal education has an important role in preparing citizens to respond appropriately to the challenges posed by climate change. The keynote speaker will address this role and provide an overview of the need for climate change education in schools, the goals for climate education in K-14, and challenges and opportunities inherent to teaching and learning climate change education in schools. 9:4510:15 Questions and Answers 10:1510:30BREAK 10:3012:00Session 2: Student Understanding of Climate Change Moderator: Andy Anderson (Workshop Committee Chair) Climate change education is being taught in formal settings in various ways, both within formal courses and other activities within schools (e.g., after-school programs). This session will explore how students currently understand and learn about climate science and climate change, how climate change education is represented in current curricula materials, and appropriate pedagogies that address various goals for climate change education in K-12. Guiding Questions: What does mental model research and select items from the National Assessment of Environmental Literacy suggest about student climate literacy and understanding? What is the nature and quality of current materials for teaching climate change and climate science in K-12? What are effective teaching strategies for various climate literacy goals?

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APPENDIX A 77 10:3011:30 Presentations and Panel Discussions Eddie Boyes (University of Liverpool): Student Mental Models of Global Warming and Climate Change Frank Niepold (NOAA): Nature and Quality of Teaching Materials for Climate Change Education Tom Marcinkowski (Florida Institute of Technology): Climate Literacy and Climate Pedagogy 11:3012:00 Audience Q&A 12:001:00 Continued Audience Discussions Lunch served 1:004:45 Session 3: Standards and Teachers This session will explore two critical aspects that influence the nature and quality of climate change education throughout the K-12 system: how standards may influence what is taught in classrooms, how teachers currently address climate change and climate science, and how teachers can be supported in effective ways. 1:002:15 Session 3A: Role of Science Education Standards Moderator: Jim Geringer (Workshop Committee Member) This section will discuss the role of new science education standards and other frameworks, such as state environmental literacy plans and state standards in providing opportunities for addressing climate change and climate science in the K-12 curriculum. 1:002:00 Presentations and Panel Discussions Brian Reiser (Northwestern University) and Stephen Pruitt (Achieve): Addressing climate change in the NRC Framework and the next generation science education standards Gilda Wheeler (Office of Superintendant of Public Instruction, State of Washington): A perspective from the state of Washington

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78 CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION IN FORMAL SETTINGS, K-14 Stephen Pruitt (Achieve): Challenges with controversial science issues 2:002:15Clarifying Questions to Prepare for the Breakout Discussions 2:153:15 Session 3B: Teacher Understanding and Preparation Moderator: Tamara Ledley (Workshop Committee Member) Teacher preparation and understanding of climate science and climate change issues are key components for providing effective climate change education in K-14. This session will explore current teacher practices in K-14 climate change and climate science education, and strategies to support climate science and climate change teaching in the classroom. 2:153:15 Presentations and Panel Discussions Susan Buhr (University of Colorado at Boulder): Navigating climate science in the classroom: Teacher preparation, practices, perceptions and professional development Roberta Johnson (National Earth Science Teachers Association): Addressing teacher practices and barriers and challenges inherent with teaching climate change education Francis Eberle (National Science Teachers Association): Discussant 3:153:30 BREAK 3:304:30 Breakout Sessions: Small Group Discussions Workshop participants will continue the discussion initiated in the two previous panel discussions (standards and teacher preparation) during small group discussions. Workshop participants can choose to focus on either the role of standards in climate science and climate change education, or on how teachers are prepared and supported in teaching climate science and climate change.

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APPENDIX A 79 Guiding Questions: Role of Science Education Standards 1. What is the role of new Science Education Standards and other frameworks (State Environmental Literacy Plans and State Standards) in providing opportunities or barriers for K-12 CCE? How is the framework similar to or different from current practices? 2. In addition to the areas identified in the Conceptual Framework for New Science Education Standards, where should climate change education be covered in the curriculum? 3. In the translation from the Framework to the Standards, what are the opportunities to embed climate change literacy more broadly across disciplines? 4. What are the leverage points for incorporating climate change education into each level of education (elementary, middle, high school)? Teacher Understanding and Preparation 1. What types of pedagogical knowledge is needed to teach climate change or climate science? How can we help teachers to obtain the knowledge they need to teach climate change comprehensively? 2. How can teachers and principals overcome skepticism about climate change and climate change education, e.g., from parents or administrators? 3. What are strategies for finding appropriate curricular materials? 4. How can schools/districts organize themselves so that teachers are motivated to teach climate change? 4:305:00Report from Breakout Session: Synthesis and Lessons Learned 5:00 Wrap-up of Day Thursday, September 1 8:309:00 Individual Discussion of Day 1 (Breakfast available)

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80 CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION IN FORMAL SETTINGS, K-14 9:009:15 Welcome and overview of Day 2 Andy Anderson (Workshop Committee Chair) 9:1510:45Session 4: Innovations in Providing Opportunities to Engage in Climate Change Education in High School and Colleges Moderator: Louisa Koch (Workshop Committee Member) This session will explore innovations in teaching climate change education, including links between high school and the first two years of college. Discussion will focus on issues such as student engagement and motivation, addressing the interdisciplinary nature of climate change and climate science, and strategies for education toward stewardship and citizenship. Guiding Questions: What is the role of AP courses, particularly AP environmental science, in teaching students about climate change and climate science? What examples of effective and innovative and potentially inter- and transdisciplinary practices in climate change and climate science education can we find in high school and colleges? What can we learn from alternative approaches to climate change education in schools that make use of out-of-school models for teaching and learning? 9:1510:45 Presentations and Panel Discussions Karen Lionberger (College BoardAP Program): AP courses and climate science and climate change education LuAnne Thompson (University of Washington): Partnerships between high schools and universities Nicky Phear (University of Montana): Developing and implementing an interdisciplinary climate change minor Matt Lappe (Alliance for Climate Education): Bringing climate change to schools and back home Mike Town (Steering Committee Member): Discussant

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APPENDIX A 81 10:4511:00 BREAK 11:0012:00 Breakout Sessions Workshop participants will continue the discussion initiated in the previous panel in small groups, inspired by topics like innovation in high schools, linkages between high school and college, inter- and transdisciplinary approaches, and using out-of-school resources for school-based instruction. The breakout discussions allow participants to innovate and share, but all are asked to address how new ideas can be evaluated and brought to scale. Guiding Questions: Use questions for overall session (listed above) 12:001:00 Continued Audience Discussions Lunch served 1:002:00 Bringing It All Together: A Plenary Discussion Moderator: Andy Anderson (Workshop Committee Chair) 2:002:30 Workshop Implications and Next Steps Andy Anderson (Workshop Committee Chair) Martin Storksdieck (Director, Board on Science Education) Jim Mahoney (Climate Change Education Roundtable Chair) 2:30 Meeting Adjourned

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82 CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION IN FORMAL SETTINGS, K-14 Participant List Workshop on Climate Change Education in Formal Settings, K-14 Bethany Adamec, American Geophysical Union Charles W. "Andy" Anderson, Michigan State University John Baek, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times/Tribune Co. Alix Beatty, National Research Council Miriam Bertram, University of Washington Jacob Clark Blickenstaff, American Physical Society David Blockstein, National Council for Science and the Environment Gillian Bowsen, Monash University Eddie Boyes, University of Liverpool Carol Brewer, University of Montana James Brey, American Meteorological Society Susan Buhr, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences Elizabeth Burck, National Aeronautics and Space Administration David Campbell, National Science Foundation Carly Carroll, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Lin Chambers, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Nancy Colleton, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Juliet Crowell, National Science Resources Center, Smithsonian Institution Alphonse DeSena, National Science Foundation Brian Dozd, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency William Easterling, Pennsylvania State University Francis Eberle, National Science Teachers Association Daniel Edelson, National Geographic Society Akiko Elders, National Science Foundation Lynn Elfner, The Ohio Academy of Science Thomas Emrick, Smithsonian Institute Evelina Feliate-Maurice, U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Mary Ford, National Geographic Education Programs Sherrie Forrest, National Research Council Edward Geary, The Globe Program Laurie Geller, National Research Council James Geringer, Environmental Systems Research Institute Sophia Gershman, Watchung Hills Regional High School Patricia Gober, Arizona State University Sara Harris, University of British Columbia Alexis Heath, National Council for Science and the Environment

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APPENDIX A 83 Joseph Heimlich, Ohio State University Matthew Inman, Department of Energy Roberta Johnson, National Earth Science Teachers Association Jill Karsten, National Science Foundation Louisa Koch, Office of Education, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Jay Labov, National Research Council Carol Landis, Byrd Polar Research Center Matt Lappe, Alliance for Climate Education Tamara Ledley, TERC Kimberly Lightle, Ohio State University Karen Lionberger, The College Board James Mahoney, Consultant Thomas Marcinkowski, Florida Institute of Technology Ann Martin, Langley Research Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Erin McDougal, National Science Foundation Katie McGaughey, National Science Foundation Cathy Middlecamp, University of WisconsinMadison Kristina Mitchell, Pennsylvania State University Michael Mogil, How the Weatherworks Teresa Mourad, Ecological Society of America Bree Murphy, Estuarine Reserves Division, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Frank Niepold, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration David Oberbillig, U.S. Department of Energy Rajul Pandya, University Corporation of Atmospheric Research Jean Pennycook, National Science Foundation Nicky Phear, University of Montana Matthew Pines, National Science Foundation Monica Plisch, American Physical Society Stephen Pruitt, Achieve, Inc. Brian Reiser, Northwestern University Kimberly Roe, National Science Foundation Joshua Rosenau, National Center for Science Education Stacey Rudolph, Office of Education, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Joel Scheraga, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Karen Scott, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Bono Sen, Environmental Health Perspectives, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Jennifer Skene, Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley

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84 CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION IN FORMAL SETTINGS, K-14 Nancy Songer, University of Michigan Peg Steffen, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Martin Storksdieck, National Research Council Daniel Strain, Science News Cathlyn Stylinski, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Marilyn Suiter, National Science Foundation Surili Sutaria, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials Luanne Thompson, University of Washington Mike Town, Redmond High School Jeanne Troy, Koshland Science Museum Jermelina Tupas, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture Louie Tupas, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture Elizabeth Walsh, University of Washington Cynthia Wei, National Science Foundation Ming-Ying Wei, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Gilda Wheeler, Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction Ted Willard, American Association for the Advancement of Science Carolyn Wilson, National Science Foundation Linda Wilson, Project 2061/AAAS Deborah Wojcik, University of Florida