Appendix C

Biographical Sketches of Presenters,
Steering Committee Members, and Staff

PRESENTERS

EDDIE BOYES is senior lecturer in education and chairman of the Board of Studies of the Centre for Lifelong Learning and director of postgraduate research in the Educational Development Division at the University of Liverpool. He is involved with a number of projects in the division, mainly involving statistical analysis. His current research interests include conceptual understanding of physical phenomena and the preconceptions that children, students, and adults hold about major environmental and health issues, including public concerns about scientific advances. He is a member of the Environmental Education Research Unit and has published widely on children’s understanding of science and environmental education issues.

SUSAN BUHR directs the education outreach program of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES). Before beginning her work in K-12 education, she conducted research in atmospheric chemistry analytical methods with CIRES and the Aeronomy Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. She enjoys the opportunity to learn about a wide variety of science topics through education work, as well as working with educators, students, geoscientists, and social scientists. Her current projects include professional development workshops for science teachers, provision of education related to research projects, and oversight of numerous other education projects within the CIRES outreach group. She has a B.S. in chemistry from California Poly-



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Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Presenters, Steering Committee Members, and Staff PRESENTERS EDDIE BOYES is senior lecturer in education and chairman of the Board of Studies of the Centre for Lifelong Learning and director of postgradu- ate research in the Educational Development Division at the University of Liverpool. He is involved with a number of projects in the division, mainly involving statistical analysis. His current research interests include conceptual understanding of physical phenomena and the preconceptions that children, students, and adults hold about major environmental and health issues, including public concerns about scientific advances. He is a member of the Environmental Education Research Unit and has pub- lished widely on children's understanding of science and environmental education issues. SUSAN BUHR directs the education outreach program of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES). Before begin- ning her work in K-12 education, she conducted research in atmospheric chemistry analytical methods with CIRES and the Aeronomy Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. She enjoys the opportunity to learn about a wide variety of science topics through educa- tion work, as well as working with educators, students, geoscientists, and social scientists. Her current projects include professional development workshops for science teachers, provision of education related to research projects, and oversight of numerous other education projects within the CIRES outreach group. She has a B.S. in chemistry from California Poly- 87

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88 CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION IN FORMAL SETTINGS, K-14 technic State University, San Luis Obispo, and a Ph.D. in analytical chem- istry from the University of Colorado, Boulder. FRANCIS Q. EBERLE is executive director of the National Science Teach- ers Association. Previously, as executive director of the Maine Mathemat- ics and Science Alliance (MMSA), he worked to develop state curricu- lum frameworks and provide professional development and resources to schools and teachers throughout Maine. Prior to joining MMSA, he was an adjunct faculty member of the University of Southern Maine and is also a former Maine middle and high school science teacher. He was presi- dent of the Maine Science Teachers Association and has served on advi- sory groups for the National Alliance of State Science and Mathematics Coalitions, the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence, and the Maine Space Grant Consortium. His research has focused on integrating engineering into the high school curriculum, training in-service teachers, mentoring new teachers, involving parents in science and mathematics, and integrating technology into the science and mathematics classroom. He has a B.A. in science education from Boston University, a master's degree in educational psychology from the University of Connecticut, and a Ph.D. in educational studies from Lesley University. DANIEL EDELSON is vice president for education at the National Geo- graphic Society and executive director of the society's Education Founda- tion. In his position as vice president, he oversees National Geographic's outreach to educators and its efforts to improve geographic and geosci- ence education in the United States and abroad. Previously, he was a professor in education and computer science at Northwestern University. He also created professional development programs for educators from middle school through college and led several large-scale instructional reform efforts in the Chicago Public Schools. He has written extensively on motivation, classroom teaching and learning, educational technology, and teacher professional development. He is author of numerous papers in journals, edited books, and conference proceedings, including The Cam- bridge Handbook of the Learning Sciences, and The International Handbook on Science Education, among others. He has a B.S. in engineering sciences from Yale University and a Ph.D. in computer science (artificial intelli- gence) from Northwestern University. ROBERTA JOHNSON is the executive director of the National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA) and director of Special Projects at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Office of Educa- tion and Outreach. She is also a research scientist in the High Altitude Observatory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. NESTA is a

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APPENDIX C 89 nonprofit educational organization that works to advance and improve earth science education at all levels. Previously, as a research scientist at the University of Michigan, she started Windows to the Universe, an award winning web-based educational tool. She serves on numerous advisory boards for projects in science education, outreach, and diver- sity and has extensive experience advising the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, and a variety of professional societies. She is the chair of the International Council for Science's Ad Hoc Review Panel on Science Education. She has B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees, the latter in geophysics and space physics, from the University of California, Los Angeles. MATT LAPPE is a program officer at the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE), Colorado. Before joining ACE, Mr. Lappe worked as a policy ana- lyst for the Tomales Bay Institute, where he helped Peter Barnes develop the Cap and Dividend climate policy framework, now advocated by politicians across the country. He taught at a small charter high school in Mendocino County, where he headed the science and social studies departments, and he founded the Sustainable Energy Education Program. He has a B.S. and an M.S. from Stanford University's Earth Systems Pro- gram; he has also studied paleoclimate and environmental hydrology throughout Patagonia, Vietnam, and Cambodia. KAREN LIONBERGER is the director of curriculum and content devel- opment for the College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) environmental science and AP physics courses. She taught AP environmental science for many years in Atlanta, where she also worked with the Georgia Depart- ment of Education as a workshop consultant for AP teachers. For six years, she served as an AP environmental science exam reader for the College Board. She has worked on numerous projects as a coauthor and content editor for instructor's guides and student study guides that sup- port the AP environmental science curriculum. In 2010, she coauthored a new student study guide called Fast Track to a Five: Preparing for the AP Environmental Science Exam. THOMAS MARCINKOWSKI is the Acopian program chair of the grad- uate program in environmental education at the Florida Institute of Tech- nology and coordinator of the university-wide undergraduate Quality Enhancement Program. He is active in the efforts of the North Ameri- can Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE) to enhance the preparation and professional development of environmental education, serving on the writing team and as a reviewer for the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education Standards, as secretary to the

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90 CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION IN FORMAL SETTINGS, K-14 certification advisory council, and as chair of the accreditation board. He also served as chair of NAAEE's research commission and contributed reviews of research. He has been a member of the National Environmental Literacy Assessment (NELA) research team. He is currently developing a framework for assessing environmental literacy with representatives from NELA, NAAEE, and the Programme for International Student Assess- ment. He has an M.S. in forestry, with a concentration in nonformal environmental education and environmental interpretation, and a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction, with a concentration in science and envi- ronmental education, from Southern Illinois University. FRANK NIEPOLD is climate education coordinator in the Climate Pro- gram Office of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); a member of the NOAA Education Council; cochair of the newly formed Education Interagency Working Group of the Climate Change Sci- ence Program (CCSP); member of the Communications Interagency Work- ing Group; and a founding member of the Climate Literacy Network. At NOAA, he develops and implements climate goal education and other efforts that specifically relate to NOAA's environmental literacy crosscut- ting priority. He is coauthor of Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Science. As cochair of the CCSP's education interagency working group, he works to develop the interagency partnership as well as coor- dination and strategic direction of the federal climate science education efforts to support the development of a knowledgeable and informed nation relative to climate. He has a B.A. in human ecology from the Col- lege of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor and an M.S.Ed. in earth space science education from Johns Hopkins University, with areas of concentration in earth observing systems, scientist/teacher/student collaboration, and earth systems science education focused on climate. NICKY PHEAR is a faculty member at the University of Montana, where she coordinates and instructs in the Climate Change Studies Program. The climate change studies minor offers students a multidisciplinary understanding of climate change and involves them in developing solu- tions. She coteaches the introductory course Climate Change: Science and Society and develops experiential learning opportunities for students through internships, practicums, and field courses. She has taught for several campus- and field-based programs, including the university's Wilderness and Civilization Program, the Wild Rockies Field Institute, Prescott College, and the Colorado Outward Bound School. She is the cofounder of a summer "Cycle the Rockies" program, in which university students study alternative energy production and climate change as they bicycle 700 miles across the state of Montana. In the winter, she leads a

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APPENDIX C 91 field course in Vietnam's Mekong Delta about climate change impacts and adaptation. She has an M.S. in environmental studies from the University of Montana and is pursuing a Ph.D. in sustainability education through Prescott College. STEPHEN PRUITT is the vice president of content, research, and devel- opment at Achieve, Inc., which he joined as director of science in July 2010. He continues to lead the development of the Next Generation Sci- ence Standards. He began his career as a high school chemistry teacher in Georgia, where he taught for 12 years. In 2003, he joined the Georgia Department of Education as the program manager for science, becoming director of academic standards four years later, overseeing the contin- ued implementation of the Georgia Performance Standards in all content areas. In 2008, he became the associate superintendent of assessment and accountability, responsible for directing all state assessments and over- seeing the No Child Left Behind accountability process. In April 2009, he became chief of staff to the state school superintendent, coordinating the work of the agency and a variety of projects, including Georgia's third- ranked Race to the Top. He also served as president of the Council of State Science Supervisors and a member of the writing team for the Col- lege Board's Standards for College Success science standards. He has a B.S. in chemistry from North Georgia College and State University, an M.Ed. in science education from the University of West Georgia, and a Ph.D. in chemistry education from Auburn University. BRIAN REISER is professor of learning sciences in the School of Educa- tion and Social Policy at Northwestern University. His research examines how to make scientific practices, such as argumentation, explanation, and modeling, meaningful and effective for classroom teachers and students. He leads the MoDeLS project (Modeling Designs for Learning Science), which is developing an empirically based learning progression for the practice of scientific modeling, and BGuILE (Biology Guided Inquiry Learning Environments), which is developing software tools for support- ing students in analyzing biological data and constructing explanations. He is also on the leadership team for IQWST (Investigating and Question- ing our World through Science and Technology), a collaboration with the University of Michigan that is developing a middle school project-based science curriculum. He was a founding member of the first graduate program in learning sciences created at Northwestern and chaired the program from 1993 to 2001. He was co-principal investigator in the Center for Curriculum Materials in Science, exploring the design and enactment of science curriculum materials. He also served on the editorial boards of

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92 CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION IN FORMAL SETTINGS, K-14 Science Education and the Journal of the Learning Sciences. He has a Ph.D. in cognitive science from Yale University. LUANNE THOMPSON is director of the University of Washington Program on Climate Change as well as professor of oceanography and adjunct professor of physics and atmospheric sciences. Her research pro- gram focuses on the ocean's role in climate, using ocean and climate models along with satellite data. She is a senior fellow in the Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Oceans and a global health and envi- ronment fellow. As director of the University of Washington's Program on Climate Change, she leads the graduate certificate in climate sciences and the undergraduate minor in climate sciences. She has taught classes at both the graduate and undergraduate levels on ocean physics, the ocean's role in climate, climate dynamics, and climate modeling. She has a B.S. in physics from the University of California, Davis, an M.A. in physics from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- nology joint program in oceanography and oceanographic engineering. GILDA WHEELER is the program supervisor for environmental and sus- tainability education in the Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI). She is responsible for supporting districts, schools, teachers, and students in implementing legislatively mandated environmental and sustainability education in Washington state. She also serves on a number of state and national boards and committees, includ- ing as cochair of the E3 Washington K-12/Teacher Education Sector steer- ing committee, the national K-12 sector of the U.S. Partnership for Educa- tion for Sustainable Development, and the Council of Chief State School Officers' EdSteps Global Competency work group. Prior to joining OSPI, she was the program director for the nonprofit education organization Facing the Future, where she developed hands-on experiential curricula on global sustainability issues and led teacher workshops around the country. She was a classroom teacher for many years before turning to efforts that would support all teachers and advance the field of environ- mental and sustainability education. She has a B.A. in geography and an M.Ed. from the University of California, Santa Barbara. STEERING COMMITTEE AND STAFF CHARLES W. "ANDY" ANDERSON is professor in the Department of Teacher Education at Michigan State University. His current research focuses on the development of learning progressions leading to environ- mental science literacy for K-12 and college students. He has used con- ceptual change and sociocultural research on student learning to improve

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APPENDIX C 93 classroom science teaching and science teacher education, science cur- riculum, and science assessment. He is past president of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching and has been coeditor of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching and associate editor of Cognition and Instruction. He served as a member of the Science Framework Planning Committee of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) and the NAEP Science Standing Committee. He has a B.A. in chemistry, an M.A. in science education, and a Ph.D. in science education from the University of Texas at Austin. CAROL BREWER is professor emeritus of biology at the University of Montana and associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Her research program focused on physiological plant ecology and eco- logical education. She founded the consulting group Prairie Ecotone Research Group, LLC. She served on the editorial boards of Conservation Biology and Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. She was the vice president of education and human resources of the Ecological Society of America from 2000 to 2006. She led education planning for the National Ecological Observatory Network and the National Phenology Network, and she currently serves on boards of the American Institute of Biological Sciences, the Longterm Ecological Research Network (as chair), Earth and Sky Radio, and the National Ecological Observatory Network. In 2007, she received both the Eugene P. Odum Award for Ecological Education from the Ecological Society of America and the Education Award from the American Institute of Biological Sciences. She has a B.A. in biology from California State University, Fullerton, as well as a B.S. in science educa- tion, an M.S. in zoology and physiology, and a Ph.D. in botany from the University of Wyoming. LYNN ELFNER is chief executive officer at the Ohio Academy of Science in Columbus. He has also worked at the Mt. Orab Local School District, Ohio State University, the Ohio Environmental Council, and the Ohio Office of Budget and Management. He is a fellow of the American Asso- ciation for the Advancement of Science and has received many awards, including the Honorary 100 from Ohio in Natural Resources; the Centen- nial honoree and Friend of Science Award from the Science Education Council of Ohio; the President's Award from the Ohio Alliance for the Environment; and the President's Award from Ohio School Boards Asso- ciation. Current activities include archivist and board of directors of the National Association of Academies of Science; councilor of the Ohio State Chapter of Sigma Xi; ex officio member of the board of trustees of the Ohio Academy of Science; and member of the board of directors, ex officio

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94 CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION IN FORMAL SETTINGS, K-14 alternate member, and board of trustees of the Ohio Historical Society. He has a B.S. and an M.S. in botany from the Ohio State University. SHERRIE FORREST (Study Director) is an associate program officer with the Ocean Studies Board and the Board on Science Education at the National Research Council. She currently provides support on sev- eral projects, including the Roundtable on Climate Change Education, the Conceptual Framework for New Science Education Standards, and the Effects of the Deepwater Horizon Mississippi Canyon-252 Oil Spill on Ecosystem Services in the Gulf of Mexico. Previously, she worked as a freelance science writer. Before transitioning to her current path, she worked in the development and production of feature films and docu- mentaries in California and New York. She has a B.A. in English literature from Pepperdine University and an M.S. in biological oceanography from the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University. JAMES E. GERINGER, the 30th governor of Wyoming, is the direc- tor of policy and public sector strategies for the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) in Redlands, California. From 1967 to 1977, he served in the U.S. Air Force. He has also worked at the Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station. In 1982, he successfully ran as a Republican for a seat in the Wyoming House of Representatives. After serving there for six years, he won a seat in the Wyoming Senate. In 1994, State Senator Geringer was elected as Wyoming's governor. As gover- nor, he helped pass laws that regulated class action lawsuits, reformed bankruptcy laws, toughened crime laws, legalized charter schools, and lowered taxes. However, he broke with the Republican Party in support- ing environmental rulings and the Equal Rights Amendment. He is one of the founding governors of Western Governors University and is currently chairman of its board of trustees. He has a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Kansas State University. LOUISA KOCH is director of the Office of Education of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which is responsible for educating the public about the role of the ocean, the coasts, the Great Lakes, and the atmosphere in the global environment and developing the next generation of professionals capable of understanding and managing those resources. As director, she chairs the Education Council, which con- sists of education directors from all major education programs in NOAA. She served as NOAA's deputy assistant administrator for research. Before joining NOAA, she served as the commerce branch chief at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget and was a presidential management intern

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APPENDIX C 95 at the Department of Defense and an economist with the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress. She has a B.S. in physics from Middle- bury College and an M.S. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. TAMARA SHAPIRO LEDLEY is senior scientist and interim director of the Center for Science Teaching and Learning at the Technical Education Research Center. Her work in earth systems science education included developing museum exhibits, contributing science content to planetarium shows, directing teacher training programs, developing learning activities and a teacher guide for the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program, and facilitating the use of earth science data in educational contexts. She developed the Earth Explora- tion Toolbook; led the Digital Library for Earth System Education Data Services and AccessData projects; and led the Tools for Data Analysis in the Middle School Classroom project. She is a founding member and chair of the Climate Literacy Network, with projects that include the Cli- mate Literacy and Energy Awareness Pathway. She has served as chair of the Standing Committee for Education and as vice president for the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP Federation) and is a member of the board of trustees of the Foundation of Earth Science. She was chair of the Committee on Global and Environmental Change of the American Geophysical Union. She has a B.S. in astronomy from the University of Maryland and a Ph.D. in meteorology and physical ocean- ography from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. MARTIN STORKSDIECK is the director of the Board on Science Educa- tion and of the Roundtable on Climate Change Education at the National Research Council. Previously, he was director of project development and senior researcher at the Institute for Learning Innovation (ILI) where he directed ongoing research studies of science learning in immersive environments; models of involving researchers and scientists in science museums and science centers; and the impact of science hobbyists, such as amateur astronomers, on the public understanding of science. Prior to that, he was a science educator with a planetarium in Germany, where he developed shows and programs on global environmental change; served as editor, host, and producer for a weekly environmental news broad- cast; and worked as an environmental consultant specializing in local environmental management systems. He has an M.S. in biology from the Albert-Ludwigs University in Freiburg, Germany, an M.P.A. from Har- vard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government, and a Ph.D. in education from Leuphana University in Lneburg, Germany.

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96 CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION IN FORMAL SETTINGS, K-14 MICHAEL TOWN is an Einstein fellow with the National Science Board of the National Science Foundation and an Advanced Placement environ- mental science teacher at Redmond High School in Redmond, Washing- ton. His research specializes in fire ecology and the ecological interaction between pine beetles and lodgepole pines in the Yellowstone area. He has written significant environmental and science, technology, engineer- ing, and mathematics curricula. The most notable curriculum is the Cool School Challenge, which enables students to conduct energy audits in schools across the United States. He has been recognized with numer- ous awards, including the National Education Association Foundation's Green Prize for the United States; Environmental Educator of the Year from the North American Association of Environmental Educators; the Pemco/KCTS Golden Apple Award; the Conservation Fund Environ- mental Educator Award for the United States; the Western Washington/ Huxley College Distinguished Alumni Award; the Amgen Science Teacher Award; the AP/Siemens Math/Science Teacher of the Year for Washing- ton State; and the Cox/KIRO TV Environmental Hero award. He has a B.S. in science education from Western Washington University and an M.A. in education from the University of Washington.