as a nutrient and power source. Clearly, high-value products are made using algae today with success. These products are small-volume applications where the value of the product, for example nutraceuticals, can be thousands or tens of thousands of dollars per tonne. Any fuel produced in addition to the high-value product could, indeed, be sold into the fuels market profitably. The available fuel is limited to the market accessible to the high-value product. Once the market for the high-value product is saturated, the economic benefit for fuel production decreases substantially. Coproduction of fuel and other products has limited potential and is not a solution to improving economics of widespread and large-scale deployment of algal biofuels.

REFERENCES

Davis, R., A. Aden, and P.T. Pienkos. 2011. Techno-economic analysis of autotrophic microalgae for fuel production. Applied Energy 88(10):3524-3531.

DOE-EERE. (U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy). 2011. Anaerobic digestion. Available online at http://www.eere.energy.gov/basics/renewable_energy/anaerobic_digestion.html. Accessed June 8, 2012.

Redfield, A.C. 1958. The biological control of chemical factors in the environment. American Scientist 46:205-221.

Szmant, H.H. 1989. Organic building blocks of the chemical industry. New York: Wiley.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement