C

Biographies of Committee Members

Stuart J. Freedman, Chair, was the Luis W. Alvarez Chair of Experimental Physics at the University of California at Berkeley with a joint appointment to the Nuclear Science Division of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1972. His research experience spanned nuclear and atomic physics, neutrino physics, and small-scale experiments in particle physics, all focused on fundamental questions about the Standard Model. He co-chaired the American Physical Society (APS) physics of neutrinos study and the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Rare Isotope Science Assessment Committee and served as a member of the NRC Committee on EPP2010: Elementary Particle Physics in the 21st Century. Dr. Freedman was a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS).

Ani Aprahamian, Vice-Chair, is a professor of experimental nuclear physics in the Department of Physics at the University of Notre Dame. She received her undergraduate and Ph.D. degrees from Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts. Dr. Aprahamian’s research focuses on the study of nuclear structure effects (shapes, masses, decay lifetimes, and probabilities) and how they can influence stellar processes. This research is a part of the new Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics frontier center, established to address the fate of nuclei under extreme conditions such as accretion disks of binary neutron star systems or shock fronts of core collapse supernovae. The experiments are carried out by studying nuclei via radioactive ion beams at Notre Dame using the TWINSOL facility, the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) facility at Michigan State University



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C Biographies of Committee Members Stuart J. Freedman, Chair, was the Luis W. Alvarez Chair of Experimental Physics at the University of California at Berkeley with a joint appointment to the Nuclear Science Division of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1972. His research experience spanned nuclear and atomic physics, neutrino physics, and small-scale experiments in particle physics, all focused on fundamental questions about the Standard Model. He co-chaired the American Physical Society (APS) physics of neutrinos study and the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Rare Isotope Science Assessment Com- mittee and served as a member of the NRC Committee on EPP2010: Elementary Particle Physics in the 21st Century. Dr. Freedman was a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Ani Aprahamian, Vice-Chair, is a professor of experimental nuclear physics in the Department of Physics at the University of Notre Dame. She received her under- graduate and Ph.D. degrees from Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts. Dr. Aprahamian’s research focuses on the study of nuclear structure effects (shapes, masses, decay lifetimes, and probabilities) and how they can influence stellar processes. This research is a part of the new Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophys- ics frontier center, established to address the fate of nuclei under extreme condi- tions such as accretion disks of binary neutron star systems or shock fronts of core collapse supernovae. The experiments are carried out by studying nuclei via radioactive ion beams at Notre Dame using the TWINSOL facility, the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) facility at Michigan State University 244

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A pp e n d i x C 245 (MSU), the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Dr. Aprahamian is co-chair of the Department of Energy (DOE) standing subcommittee on isotope production and applications of the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) and was the National Science Foundation (NSF) program director for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advance- ment of Science (AAAS) and the APS. Ricardo Alarcon is a professor of physics at Arizona State University. He did his undergraduate studies at the University of Chile and received his Ph.D. in 1985 from Ohio University. He did postdoctoral work at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign until 1989, when he joined Arizona State University as an assis- tant professor. His research covers experiments in electromagnetic nuclear physics and, more recently, in fundamental neutron science. He has held visiting professor appointments at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1995-1997 and 1999-2001 and served as project manager for the Bates Large Acceptance Spec- trometer project at MIT-Bates from 1999 to 2002. He was a member of the DOE/ NSF NSAC from 2001 to 2005. In 2003, he was elected a fellow of the APS. He was a member of the NRC Committee on Rare Isotope Science Assessment. Gordon A. Baym is a professor of physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign. He received his bachelor’s degree in physics from Cornell University and his A.M. in mathematics and Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University. Dr. Baym has made seminal contributions to many fields, including developing much of the current understanding of the nature of neutron stars, relativistic effects in nuclear physics, condensed matter physics, quantum fluids, and most recently, Bose-Einstein condensates. He has written two textbooks on quantum mechanics and quantum statistical mechanics and has made major contributions to the schol- arly study of the history of physics. Dr. Baym is a member of the NAS and the APS and was awarded the Hans A. Bethe Prize of the American Physical Society in 2002. He has participated in many activities for the NAS, NRC, and the Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA), including serving as chair of the physics section of the NAS, participating in several decadal studies, and serving on the BPA governing board. Elizabeth Beise is a professor of physics and interim associate provost for aca- demic planning and programs at the University of Maryland in College Park. Her principal research interests in experimental nuclear physics focus on the use of electromagnetic and weak probes of the internal structure of protons, neutrons, and light nuclei, and on the use of nuclear physics techniques to test fundamental symmetries. She received the Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award from the APS in 1998

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246 Nuclear Physics and is a fellow of both the APS (2002) and the AAAS (2009). From 2004 to 2006, she was a program director for nuclear physics at the NSF. She has served on several APS Division of Nuclear Physics committees, including its Executive and Program committees, as well as the APS Council and Executive Board. She was a member of the DOE-NSF NSAC (1999-2001) and was on the writing group for the NSAC Long Range Plans for Nuclear Science in 1996, 2002, and 2007. Richard F. Casten is D. Allan Bromley Professor of Physics at Yale University. He received his Ph.D. from Yale in 1967. His field of research and expertise is nuclear structure physics and he has done both experimental and theoretical work. He brings knowledge of collective behavior and collective models in nuclei, the interacting boson approximation model, dynamical symmetries, quantum phase transitions and their critical point symmetries, the role of the proton-neutron interaction in the evolution of nuclear structure, exotic nuclei, and a large variety of experimental techniques. Dr. Casten was awarded the 2011 Tom W. Bonner Prize of the APS for his contributions to the study of regularities in nuclei and dynami- cal symmetries. He has honorary doctorates from the University of Bucharest and from Surrey University (U.K.), whose citation called him “one of the world’s most distinguished nuclear physicists.” He was the honoree at the “Mapping the Triangle” International Conference on Nuclear Structure in 2002 and is a fellow of the APS, the AAAS, and the Institute of Physics (IOP-U.K.) and an honorary fellow of the Hellenic Nuclear Physics Society. Dr. Casten was awarded the Senior (U.S.) Humboldt Prize and the 2009 Mentoring Award of the Division of Nuclear Physics (DNP) of the APS, primarily for mentoring women scientists throughout his career. He is in Who’s Who in the World and has written a textbook, Nuclear Structure from a Simple Perspective. He was director of the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale from 1995 to 2008. He was chair of NSAC in 2003, 2004, and 2005; chair of the DNP in 2008; a member of the DOE/NSF Long Range Planning Committee for Nuclear Sci- ence in 1989, 1995, 2001, and 2007; a member of the NRC Rare Isotope Sciences Assessment Committee (RISAC) in 2005 and 2006; chair of the Heavy Ion Research Center (GSI)-Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)-Nuclear Structure, Astrophysics, and Reactions (NuSTAR) Advisory Committee for the Future GSI Facility, 2004, 2005; chair, Science Advisory Committee for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 2009-2012; member the of International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) C-12 WG-9 subcommittee on international cooperation in nuclear physics, 2005-2008; cofounder and chair of the IsoSpin Laboratory Steer- ing Group and Rare Isotope Accelerator Users Group, 1989-2004; member, FRIB Users Organization Executive Committee, 2008-2010; and member, Committee on International Perceptions of U.K. Research in Physics and Astronomy, 1999, 2005. He is the associate editor of Physical Review C for experimental nuclear structure,

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A pp e n d i x C 247 an editor for journals E and L of the International Journal of Modern Physics series, and is on the editorial board of Nuclear Physics News. Jolie A. Cizewski is professor of physics in the Physics and Astronomy Depart- ment at Rutgers State University of New Jersey. She is an experimental physicist doing research in nuclear physics at the interface of nuclear structure, reactions, and astrophysics. She is also interested in the applications of nuclear physics to national nuclear security and in developing a talented and diverse workforce for national needs in nuclear science. Professor Cizewski is a fellow of the AAAS and the APS. She was also a recipient of a Sloan Foundation Fellowship and a Faculty Award for Women from the National Science Foundation. She served as the chair and member of the NRC Panel on Nuclear Data Compilations and as a member of the NRC Bits of Power Committee. She has served on NSAC, which advises DOE and the NSF, and was a member of the writing groups that developed the Long Range Plans for Nuclear Science in 2002 and 2007. She was also a coauthor of the 2004 NSAC report Education in Nuclear Science. Anna Hayes-Sterbenz has been a staff member in the theoretical division at Los Alamos National Laboratory since 1997. Prior to joining Los Alamos, she was a staff member from 1991 to 1997 in theoretical nuclear physics at the Chalk River Nuclear Labs, in Canada. She has broad theoretical expertise in nuclear physics, spanning nuclear structure, neutrino-nucleus physics, fundamental symmetries, inertial confinement fusion, nonproliferation, and national defense. She is Princi- pal Investigator (PI) and co-PI on a number of large-scale projects in both basic and applied nuclear physics and brings a perspective from the intersection of the two subfields. She is a fellow of the APS. She has served on several national com- mittees, including the APS DNP executive committee, the organizing committee for APS DNP town hall meeting on the Nuclear Science Long Range Plan, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) advisory board, the Stockpile Science Academic Alliance DOE review committee, the Oak Ridge HRIBF Applications Working Group, and several NSF and DOE review and selection committees. At Los Alamos she chairs the Nuclear, Particle, Astrophysics and Cosmology (NPAC) Laboratory Directed Research and Development committee and is a member of the NPAC advisory team, the Los Alamos distinguished postdoc selection com- mittee, and the Technical Working Group for the National Boost Initiative. She has also chaired the LANSCE User Group Executive Committee and served as the Theoretical Division nuclear weapons coordinator and the team leader for applied nuclear theory at Los Alamos. Roy J. Holt is a distinguished fellow at Argonne National Laboratory, where he serves as chief of medium-energy research in the Physics Division. He is a distinguished

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248 Nuclear Physics experimentalist with broad expertise in low- and medium-energy nuclear physics. He brings knowledge of studies of light nuclei, the nucleon, and low-energy tests of fundamental symmetries. Dr. Holt is a fellow of the APS and of the IOP. He was the 2005 recipient of the Tom W. Bonner Prize of the APS for his experimental work in nuclear physics. He served on the NSAC subcommittee to generate the 2007 Long Range Plan in Nuclear Physics. During 1994-2000, he served as professor of physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he was also a director of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory. He has served on scientific program advisory committees for a number of accelerator facilities, including the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, MIT-Bates, the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, and the Jefferson National Laboratory (JLAB) (chair); on NSAC subcommittees; and review panels for DOE, NSF, and the Natural Sci- ences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada; and on the editorial boards of Physical Review C, Nuclear Physics A, and Journal of Physics G. Karlheinz Langanke is the director of research at the GSI Helmholtz Zentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. He also is full professor at the Technische Universität Darmstadt and a senior fellow at the Frankfurt Institute of Advanced Studies. Before taking his current positions he held a chair for theoretical physics at Aarhus University in Denmark and has been a senior research associ- ate at Caltech. His research expertise is in nuclear structure and reaction theory as well as in nuclear astrophysics. Dr. Langanke is supervisory editor for Nuclear Physics A and a member of the editorial boards of Few Body Systems and the Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables. Dr. Langanke serves on many advisory committees, including the International Science Advisory Committee of FRIB, to be constructed at the MSU site, and of the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN) in Tokyo. He has been the chairman of the Program Advisory Committee of TRIUMF (once known as the Tri-University Meson Facility) (Vancouver, Canada) and served on the program advisory committees of the Large Heavy Ion National Accelerator (GANIL) (France), the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)/Isolde (Switzerland), RIKEN (Japan), and GSI (Darmstadt). He has been a member of the board of several international science institutions, including the INT in Seattle, NORDITA in Copenhagen, Denmark, the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics in the United States, and the European Center for Theoretical Nuclear Physics in Trento, Italy. Dr. Langanke has been a co-convener of the Nuclear Phys- ics European Collaboration Committee (NuPECC) Long Range Plan in nuclear physics, written in 2003. During the last 16 months, Dr. Langanke has given lecture series on nuclear astrophysics at seven institutions and schools on four continents. Cherry A. Murray (NAS/NAE) is dean of the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and serves as chair of the NRC’s Division on Engineering and

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A pp e n d i x C 249 Physical Sciences. Her research interests are the physics of surfaces, condensed matter, and complex fluids, with an emphasis on light scattering and imaging. In addition to her research, Dr. Murray has substantial background in research man- agement, having served as deputy director for science and technology at the LLNL, after serving as senior vice president for Bell Labs Research, Lucent Technologies. Witold Nazarewicz is a professor of physics at the Department of Physics, Uni- versity of Tennessee, and distinguished R&D staff at the Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He is a distinguished theorist with broad expertise in nuclear physics, many-body problems, interdisciplinary many-body science, and computational physics. He is listed by the Institute for Scientific Information as among the most highly cited authors in physics. Dr. Nazarewicz is a fellow of AAAS, APS, and IOP. He was awarded the 2012 Tom W. Bonner Prize of the APS for his work in developing and applying nuclear density functional theory, motivating experiments and interpreting their results, and implementing a comprehensive theoretical framework for the physics of exotic nuclei. He received an honorary doctorate from the University of the West of Scotland and previously served on two NRC committees—the Committee on Nuclear Physics (1996-1999) and the Rare Isotope Science Assessment Committee (2005-2007). He is a director of the Uni- versal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF) Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program at DOE, associate editor of Reviews of Modern Physics, editor with Computer Physics Communications, member of the FRIB Science Advisory Committee, and member of the steering committees of the Japan-U.S. Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei (JUSTIPEN) and the France-U.S. Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei (FUSTIPEN). Dr. Naza- rewicz has served on numerous DOE, NSF, and DNP/APS committees, including NSAC; was a member of the nuclear physics Long-Range Planning Working Groups in 1995, 2001-2002, 2005, and 2007-2008; and has served on advisory committees of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL)/MSU, ATLAS/ ANL, the 88-in. cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), HRIBF/ORNL, Institute for Nuclear Theory/Seattle, JLAB, and TRIUMF/Canada. In 2000-2005 he was a co-chair and chair of the RIA Users Organization. Konstantinos Orginos is an assistant professor of physics at the College of Wil- liam and Mary. He is also a senior staff member of the theory center at the JLAB. He received his Ph.D. in physics from Brown University in 1998, worked as a postdoctoral associate at the University of Arizona and the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and was a research scientist at the Laboratory for Nuclear Science at MIT. He joined the faculty at the College of William and Mary in 2005. He is the recipient of a DOE Outstanding Junior Investigator award. His research focuses on lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) calculations relevant for understanding

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250 Nuclear Physics the structure of hadrons and the emergence of the nuclear force from QCD. He has broad experience on the use of high-performance computing for performing calculations relevant to hadronic structure and interactions relevant for establish- ing the connection between QCD and nuclear physics. Krishna Rajagopal is a professor of physics at MIT and is the associate head for education of the MIT Department of Physics. He obtained his doctorate at Princ- eton in 1993 and then spent 3 years at Harvard as a junior fellow and 1 year at Caltech before coming to MIT in 1997. Dr. Rajagopal enjoys thinking about QCD in extreme conditions because it requires linking usually disparate strands of theo- retical physics, including nuclear physics, particle physics, string theory, condensed matter physics, and astrophysics. His research interests include the properties of the cold dense quark matter that may lie at the centers of neutron stars. His work shows that this stuff is a transparent insulator, not an electric conductor as previ- ously assumed, and may in a certain sense be crystalline. Dr. Rajagopal also stud- ies the hot quark soup that filled the universe shortly after the big bang and that is created in current experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). He uses gauge/gravity duality—originally developed by string theorists trying to understand quantum gravity—to understand properties of hot quark soup. He has also analyzed the critical point in the QCD phase diagram and has proposed signatures for its experimental detection. Dr. Rajagopal serves on the RHIC Pro- gram Advisory Committee and the editorial board of Physical Review D. He is a member of the executive committee of the DNP of the APS. He served on the NSAC subcommittee on nuclear theory. He is a fellow of the APS. He was the MIT Class of 1958 assistant professor and has been a DOE Outstanding Junior Investigator and an Alfred P. Sloan research fellow. R.G. Hamish Robertson is the Boeing Distinguished Professor of Physics at the University of Washington and director of the Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics. He took his undergraduate degree at Oxford and his Ph.D. in atomic-beam and nuclear-structure physics at McMaster. Upon gradua- tion, Dr. Robertson went to Michigan State University as a postdoctoral fellow and remained on the faculty, becoming a professor of physics in 1981. In that same year, he joined Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and investigated neutrino mass via tritium beta decay and solar neutrino physics. Dr. Robertson was appointed a fellow of LANL in 1988 and initiated the laboratory’s collaboration in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. He has served as the U.S. co-spokesman for that project and was scientific director in 2003-2004. Results from this experiment have shown that neutrinos have mass and are strongly mixed in flavor, in contradiction to the Standard Model of particle physics. In 1994, Dr. Robertson took a professor- ship at the University of Washington, where he is continuing his work in neutrino

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A pp e n d i x C 251 physics. In 2003 he was elected to fellowship in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and in 2004 to the NAS. A past member of NRC’s Board of Physics and Astronomy, he has also served on several committees, including the Nuclear Physics and Neutrino Astrophysics panels. Thomas J. Ruth is senior research scientist at TRIUMF and senior scientist at the British Columbia Cancer Research Centre. In addition he is adjunct professor of pharmaceutical sciences and medicine at the University of British Columbia, of chemistry at Simon Fraser University, and of physics at the University of Victoria. He is a leader in the production and application of radioisotopes for research in the physical and biological sciences. His efforts at establishing positron emission tomography (PET) as a quantitative tool for in vivo biochemistry have been rec- ognized by the Canadian Nuclear Medicine Society’s highest award of meritori- ous status. He has served on a multitude of committees, including the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Committee on Medical Isotopes (1995), the NRC’s Committee on the State of the Science in Nuclear Medicine, the IOM panel on the Status and Future of Nuclear Medicine (2007-2008), and the NAS panel on the Production of Medical Isotopes without HEU (2008-2009). He was a member of the NSAC Sub- committee on Isotopes (2009). In addition he serves as an expert on radioisotope production for the International Atomic Energy Agency. He has published more than 250 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters. Dr. Ruth received his Ph.D. in nuclear spectroscopy from Clark University. Hendrik Schatz is professor of physics at the Department of Physics and Astron- omy and the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. He is associate director and cofounder of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, an NSF Physics Frontiers Center. Dr. Schatz is a distinguished experi- mentalist who works at the intersection of nuclear physics and astrophysics and has also contributed to the theoretical understanding of nuclear processes in the cosmos. His particular interests are rare isotope beam experiments and the appli- cation of the results to explosive stellar processes and neutron stars. Dr. Schatz is a fellow of the APS and a member of the NSAC. He has co-chaired with Robert Janssens the town meeting “Study of Nuclei and Nuclear Astrophysics” (includ- ing co-authorship of the associated white paper) and was a member of the writ- ing committee for the NSAC 2007 Nuclear Physics Long Range Plan. He is also a member of the NRC Stars and Stellar Evolution Panel, one of the five science frontier panels of the decadal survey of astronomy and astrophysics (Astro2010). He has given an invited presentation to the NRC Rare Isotope Science Assessment Committee (RISAC) on rare isotope studies for nuclear astrophysics. Dr. Schatz is a member of the Science Advisory Committee for the FRIB and member of the

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252 Nuclear Physics program advisory committee at the ATLAS facility at Argonne National Laboratory and the GSI rare isotope facility in Germany. Robert E. Tribble is Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy and director of the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. He is an international leader in experimental nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics. His seminal contribu- tions both in instrument development and in measurement techniques have led him—and the many researchers around the world who have copied his meth- ods—to important new understanding of the fusion reactions that occur in stars and stellar explosions. In addition, he has made key contributions to the search for physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics and has also played a leading role in a large-scale experiment that studied the quark composition of the proton. He recently completed a 3-year term as chair of the NSAC. The most recent NSAC Long Range Plan for nuclear science was completed during his tenure. He has served on numerous NSF and DOE review panels and NSAC subcommittees, including the 2005 NSAC subcommittee on implementing the 2002 Long Range Plan, which he chaired. He is presently either a member or chair of four program advisory committees for facilities around the world and a member of science advi- sory committees for ANL, JLAB, the FRIB, and a new national laboratory in Korea based on the KORIA accelerator facility. Last year he was voted vice-chair of the APS Division of Nuclear Physics. William A. Zajc is a professor and chair of the Physics Department at Columbia University. His undergraduate studies were at the California Institute of Technol- ogy, and he obtained his Ph.D. in physics at the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Zajc’s research interests center on the experimental study of QCD as studied via collisions of nuclei at relativistic energies, with an emphasis on understanding the properties of matter under the extreme conditions where the quark and gluons no longer are confined to individual neutrons and protons. From 1997 to 2006 Dr. Zajc served as spokesperson for the PHENIX experiment (Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction Experiment) at BNL’s RHIC and was deeply involved in the 2005 discovery of “the perfect liquid” formed in collisions of heavy nuclei at RHIC. Among his many professional activities are participation in the 1996, 2002, and 2007 NSAC Long Range Plan writing groups and service on the NSAC (2004-2007). He has also served on the advisory committee of the Institute for Nuclear Theory, the editorial board of Annual Reviews of Nuclear and Particle Physics and the JLAB Science Council. He is currently vice-chair of the BNL Science and Technology Steering Committee. In 2010, Dr. Zajc served as chair of the APS DNP (2010-2011). Dr. Zajc is a fellow of the APS and of the AAAS.