Appendix J

Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff

Charles P. O’Brien, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair), is Kenneth E. Appel professor and vice chair of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the Center for Studies of Addiction. Dr. O’Brien’s work involves the discovery of central nervous system changes involved in relapse, new medications for addiction, behavioral treatments, and instruments for measuring the severity of addictive disorders. He led the discovery of the effects of alcohol on the endogenous opioid system and developed a completely new treatment for alcoholism. Many of his discoveries are now utilized in common practice for the treatment of addictive disorders throughout the world. Dr. O’Brien was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies in 1991 and has received numerous national research awards, as well as an honorary doctorate from the University of Bordeaux in 1994. He received the Nathan B. Eddy award for research on addiction from the College on Problems of Drug Dependence in 2003, the American Psychological Association (APA) Research Award for 2000, the 2010 Gold Medal for Research from the Society on Biological Psychiatry, the 2010 Sarnat Award from the Institute of Medicine for Mental Health Research, and the 2012 Jellinek award for research on alcoholism. He has been an adviser on drug policy to local and national governments since the 1970s and has chaired or served as a member of numerous IOM committees dealing with the science and policy of abused drugs. He is currently chair of the substance use disorders committee for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). Dr. O’Brien is past president of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and the Association for Research in Nervous and Mental Disease. He earned his M.D. and Ph.D.



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Appendix J Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff Charles P. O’Brien, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair), is Kenneth E. Appel professor and vice chair of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the Center for Studies of Addiction. Dr. O’Brien’s work involves the discovery of central nervous system changes involved in relapse, new medications for addiction, behavioral treatments, and instruments for measuring the severity of addictive disorders. He led the discovery of the effects of alcohol on the endogenous opioid system and developed a completely new treat- ment for alcoholism. Many of his discoveries are now utilized in common practice for the treatment of addictive disorders throughout the world. Dr. O’Brien was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies in 1991 and has received numerous national research awards, as well as an honorary doctorate from the University of Bordeaux in 1994. He received the Nathan B. Eddy award for research on addiction from the Col- lege on Problems of Drug Dependence in 2003, the American Psychological Association (APA) Research Award for 2000, the 2010 Gold Medal for Research from the Society on Biological Psychiatry, the 2010 Sarnat Award from the Institute of Medicine for Mental Health Research, and the 2012 Jellinek award for research on alcoholism. He has been an adviser on drug policy to local and national governments since the 1970s and has chaired or served as a member of numerous IOM committees dealing with the sci- ence and policy of abused drugs. He is currently chair of the substance use disorders committee for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). Dr. O’Brien is past president of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and the Association for Research in Nervous and Mental Disease. He earned his M.D. and Ph.D. 381

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382 SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS IN THE U.S. ARMED FORCES degrees from Tulane University. He received residency training at Harvard, Tulane, the University of London, and the University of Pennsylvania in internal medicine, neurology, and psychiatry and is board certified in both neurology and psychiatry. Hortensia D. Amaro, Ph.D., is associate vice provost for community research initiatives and dean’s professor of social work and preventive medicine at the University of Southern California. For the past 10 years, she served as associate dean and distinguished professor of health sciences and of counsel- ing psychology in the Bouve College of Health Sciences, and director of the Institute on Urban Health Research at Northeastern University. Her research has focused on alcohol and drug use and addiction among adolescents and adults, the development and testing of behavioral interventions for HIV/ AIDS prevention, substance abuse and mental health treatment for Latinos and African Americans, alcohol and drug use among college populations, behavioral interventions for adherence to HIV medications, and integration of behavioral health care into the pediatric medical home. She has authored more than 135 publications on these topics. Dr. Amaro has served on the editorial boards of the American Psychologist, American Journal of Public Health, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, and other lead- ing publications. She was elected to the IOM of the National Academies in 2011 and has received numerous awards from professional, government and community organizations and honorary degrees from Simmons College and the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology. Additionally, she has served on review and advisory committees for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the Cen- ters for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Amaro founded five substance abuse treatment programs for women in Boston and served on the board of the Boston Public Health Commission for 14 years. She received her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles. Rhonda Robinson Beale, M.D., is chief medical officer for OptumHealth Behavioral Solutions, a leading provider of solutions for mental health and substance use disorders in California. Dr. Robinson Beale develops qual- ity initiatives and clinical systems for OptumHealth Behavioral Solutions. She has more than 20 years of experience in behavioral health and quality management and is an active member of the behavioral health community. Dr. Robinson Beale has been involved with the National Committee for Quality Assurance as a surveyor; a member of the Review Oversite Com- mittee, which makes accreditation decisions; and a member of advisory panels that developed the managed behavioral health care organization

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APPENDIX J 383 (MBHO) and disease management standards. She has also been a member of the board of directors for the IOM’s Neuroscience and Behavioral Health and Health Care Services Boards and has served on several IOM commit- tees. Dr. Robinson Beale participated on the National Quality Forum’s board of directors as co-chair for the Evidence-Based Practices to Treat Substance Use Disorders Steering Committee. Before joining OptumHealth Behavioral Solutions, she was chief medical officer for PacifiCare Behavioral Health. She also served as senior vice president and chief medical officer for CIGNA Behavioral Health, national medical director for Blue Cross Blue Shield, executive medical director of medical and care management clinical programs for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, and senior medical direc- tor for behavioral medicine for Health Alliance Plan. Dr. Robinson Beale received her medical degree from Wayne State University and her psychiat- ric training at Detroit Psychiatric Institute. She is certified in psychiatry by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. Robert M. Bray, Ph.D., a fellow of the APA, is a senior research psy- chologist and director of the Substance Abuse Epidemiology and Military Behavioral Health Program at RTI International. His research interests focus on the epidemiology of substance use and other health behaviors in military and civilian populations, with an emphasis on understanding the prevalence, causes, correlates, and consequences of these behaviors. He has directed nine comprehensive worldwide Department of Defense health behavior surveys of active duty military personnel that have furnished the most widely cited data on substance use and health behaviors in the military and is preparing a book summarizing findings from these studies. He has directed and supported other studies in the military assessing health-related behaviors among the reserve component, risk and protective factors for initiation of tobacco and alcohol use, mental fitness and resilience among Army basic trainees, and a Web-based intervention to reduce heavy alcohol use. He is currently leading the RTI component of a large multi-institutional clinical trial to optimize usual primary care for soldiers with posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. Dr. Bray is principal editor of Drug Use in Metropolitan America, which integrates findings from a large-scale study of drug use among diverse populations in the Washington, DC, metropoli- tan area. He has published and presented widely in the area of substance use– and health-related behaviors. Dr. Bray previously served on an IOM committee examining drug use in the workplace. He received his Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Illinois and his M.S. and A.B. degrees in psychology from Brigham Young University. Raul Caetano, M.D., Ph.D., is regional dean and professor of epidemiology at the Dallas Regional Campus of the University of Texas School of Public

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384 SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS IN THE U.S. ARMED FORCES Health. He also is dean and professor of health care sciences and psychia- try at the School of Health Professions, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, in Dallas. His area of expertise is the epidemiology of substance use by minorities, including studies of the association between intimate partner violence and substance use. He is well published in this area and also serves on the editorial boards of many substance abuse jour- nals. Dr. Caetano also serves on the advisory boards for several substance abuse agencies in his community. Before coming to the University of Texas system in 1998, he was a senior scientist and director of the California- based Alcohol Research Group, a National Alcohol Research Center funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. He previously served on an IOM committee that examined coverage for substance abuse treatment. Dr. Caetano earned his M.D. in psychiatry from the State Uni- versity of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil. From 1973 to 1974 he was at the Lon- don School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and from 1973 to 1976 he was a research psychiatrist at the Institute of Psychiatry of the University of London in England. He also earned an M.P.H. in behavioral sciences and a Ph.D. in epidemiology, both from the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley. Mathea Falco, J.D., is president of Drug Strategies, a nonprofit research institute in Washington, DC, established in 1992, that promotes more effective approaches to the nation’s drug problems. She is a visiting scholar at the Harvard Law School Center for International Criminal Justice and was a fellow at Harvard’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, as well as associate professor of public health, Weill Medical College/Cornell University, in New York City. The author of The Making of a Drug Free America: Programs That Work (Times Books, 1994), as well as numerous articles, Ms. Falco comments frequently on drug policy in the media and in public speeches across the country. Until 1993, she was director of health policy, Department of Public Health, Cornell University Medical College, in New York City. From 1977 to 1981, Ms. Falco was assistant secretary of state for International Narcotics Matters. Earlier, she served as chief counsel and staff director for the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee’s Juvenile Delinquency Subcommittee, special assistant to the president of the Drug Abuse Council, and senior associate of the Carnegie Endowment for Inter- national Peace. Ms. Falco received her B.A. from Radcliffe College and her J.D. from Yale Law School. Joyce M. Johnson, D.O., M.A., is vice president of health sciences and chief medical officer in Battelle’s Health and Life Sciences Global Business, located in Arlington, Virginia. She joined Battelle in December 2003 upon her retirement from the U.S. Public Health Service (Rear Admiral, Upper

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APPENDIX J 385 Half). She had been assigned to the U.S. Coast Guard, Department of Homeland Security, as chief medical officer/director, health and safety, and functioned as the Coast Guard’s surgeon general. Her other government assignments included senior scientific and management positions with the Food and Drug Administration and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. She has held clinical positions at the National Institute of Mental Health and the VA. At the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, she was an Epidemiologic Intelligence Service officer and staff epidemiologist in the Center for Infectious Disease. Dr. Johnson is a physician board certified in three specialties—public health and preventive medicine, clinical pharmacology, and psychiatry. In addition to her medical degree, she earned a master’s degree in hospital and health administration and has received five honorary doctoral degrees. She is a certified addic- tion specialist and certified food service executive. Dr. Johnson earned her bachelor’s degree from Luther College, her master’s degree in hospital and health administration from the University of Iowa, and her medical degree from Michigan State University. Thomas Kosten, M.D., is the J.H. Waggoner chair and professor of psychi­ atry, pharmacology, and neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine, and former professor and chief of psychiatry at Yale University and the VA in Connecticut. He is research director of the VA National Substance Use Dis- orders Quality Enhancement Research Initiative, based in Houston, Texas. Dr. Kosten is founder of the Division of Substance Abuse at Baylor and Yale and directs their NIH Medications Development Center for substance abuse. He has been supported by a Research Scientist Award from NIH since 1987 and has served on national and international review groups for medications development in substance abuse. Dr. Kosten has been a con- gressional fellow in the House of Representatives and a visiting professor in Canada, China, Germany, Greece, and Spain. He is founding vice chair for Added Qualifications in Addiction Psychiatry of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, a distinguished fellow in the APA, a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, and past president of both the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry and the College on Problems of Drug Dependence. Dr. Kosten received his B.S. from the Rens- selaer Polytechnic Institute, his M.A. from Yale, and his M.D. from Cornell University Medical College. Mary Jo Larson, Ph.D., is senior scientist at the Institute for Behavioral Health, Schneider Institutes for Health Policy, Heller School for Social Pol- icy and Management, Brandeis University. She is a health services researcher specializing in access to and quality and cost of care delivered in mental health and substance abuse service delivery systems. She also has expertise

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386 SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS IN THE U.S. ARMED FORCES in the military health care system and the impact of the Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom conflicts on military families. With funding from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, she is conducting a study on recent combat veterans using longitudinal military health care data. Dr. Larson has conducted primary data collection studies on the out- comes of care in community-based detoxification programs and outpatient addiction programs within managed care and public systems, outcomes of integrated services for comorbid disorders for women with trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder, and other studies of service delivery systems for populations that are disenfranchised or experiencing chronic homeless- ness or incarceration. She has conducted secondary data analysis projects (Medicaid, Medicare, National Endangered Species Act Reform Coalition [NESARC]), including studies that merged large public-sector databases. Dr. Larson received her Ph.D. from The Heller School at Brandeis Uni- versity, her M.P.A. from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and her B.A. in psychology from the University of Minnesota. David C. Lewis, M.D., is professor emeritus of community health and medicine and Donald G. Millar emeritus distinguished professor of alcohol and addiction studies at Brown University. In 1982 he founded and for 18 years he directed the Brown University Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies. Dr. Lewis is a graduate of Brown University and Harvard Medical School. Trained in internal medicine, he is a fellow of the American College of Physicians. He has been a member of several boards of directors, includ- ing those of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (where he was chairman of the board), the American Society of Addiction Medicine, the Drug Policy Alliance, the Veterans Healing Initiative and the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse. He is the founder of Physician Leadership on National Drug Policy (PLNDP) and now serves on the board of directors of the new PLNDP—Physicians and Lawyers for National Drug Policy. Dr. Lewis has an international reputation for his work on substance abuse treatment, medical education, and public policy. Dennis McCarty, Ph.D., is professor in the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, ­ Oregon, and co–principal investigator for the Western States Node of the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network. Dr. McCarty collaborates with policy makers in state and federal government and with community-based programs to conduct studies that examine the organiza- tion, financing, and delivery of substance abuse treatment services. Between 1989 and 1995, Dr. McCarty served as director of the Massachusetts

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APPENDIX J 387 Bureau of Substance Abuse Services for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. He currently serves on Oregon’s Alcohol and Drug Policy Commission. Dr. McCarty served on two prior IOM committees and was a co-editor for both committee reports: Managing Managed Care: Quality Improvement in Behavioral Health Care and Bridging the Gap Between Practice and Research: Forging Partnerships with Community-Based Drug and Alcohol Treatment. He received his B.A. degree in psychology and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in social psychology from the University of Kentucky. In 2007, he was named a fellow in the APA. He is a member of the editorial boards for the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment and the Journal of Behavioral Health Services and Research. Mary Ann Pentz, Ph.D., is professor of preventive medicine and director of the Institute for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research at the University of Southern California. Her research focuses on community and policy approaches to tobacco, alcohol, and drug abuse prevention in youth. She is widely published in psychology, public health, and medical journals on the use of multicomponent approaches to community-based prevention that include mass media. The findings from her longitudinal prevention trials contributed to the formulation of a U.S. Senate bill, as well as the use of evidence-based criteria for appropriating funds for prevention under the Safe and Drug Free Schools Act, for which she provided U.S. congres- sional testimony sponsored by Senator Kennedy. Dr. Pentz has chaired the National Institute on Drug Abuse Epidemiology and Prevention study sec- tion. She has served on the evaluation advisory boards for the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention’s Community Partnership grants program and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Fighting Back Initiative; on the Office of National Drug Control Policy’s Campaign Design expert panel, tasked to design the new anti-drug abuse media campaigns; on the U.S.A. Horn General’s Methamphetamine Task Force (under Janet Reno); and as a member of the NIH Peer Review Oversight Group (under the Clinton administration). Dr. Pentz received her B.A. in psychology from Hamilton College and her Ph.D. in psychology from Syracuse University. Tracy Stecker, Ph.D., is assistant professor at the Psychiatric Research Center, Department of Community and Family Medicine, at Dartmouth Medical School and a health services researcher at the White River Junc- tion VA. Dr. Stecker is a psychologist and mental health services researcher who focuses on help-seeking behavior in individuals with mental illness. She has received funding from the National Institute of Mental Health to develop and test cognitive-behavioral interventions designed to increase mental health treatment seeking among veterans returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, with a focus on those with symptoms of PTSD

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388 SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS IN THE U.S. ARMED FORCES and suicidality. She has also received funding through the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism to assess whether these interventions increase attendance at addiction treatment among individuals with alcohol use disorders. Dr. Stecker received her Ph.D. degree from the University of North Dakota, her M.A. degree from Austin Peay State University, and her B.A. degree from Clemson University. Constance Weisner, Dr.P.H., M.S.W., is associate director for health services research at the Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Pro- gram, Northern California, and professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. She directs the Drug and Alcohol Research Team, a large program of substance use research in Kaiser Permanente. Dr. Weisner is a member of the World Health Organization’s International Expert Advisory Council on Drug Dependence and Alcohol Problems, and a former member of the National Advisory Council of the National Institute on Drug Abuse and of the National Advisory Council of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, Substance Abuse and Men- tal Health Services Administration. Her research has been funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and includes the epidemiology of alcohol and drug problems and access to, outcomes of, and cost impacts of substance use treatment. Dr. Weisner has served on sev- eral IOM committees addressing topics related to mental health and addic- tion, including the recent Committee on Improving the Quality of Health Care for Mental and Substance Use Conditions. Dr. Weisner received her doctorate in public health from the University of California, Berkeley, and her M.S.W. from the University of Minnesota. Institute of Medicine Staff Maryjo M. Oster, Ph.D., is a program officer and study director at the IOM. Prior to holding this position, she served as director of research and evaluation at the Pennsylvania Coalition to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (PCPTP), a statewide organization providing leadership on the issue of adolescent pregnancy prevention through advocacy, education, and support for community efforts. At PCPTP, she was the lead evaluator for a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–funded project to promote science- based approaches to teen pregnancy prevention in schools and community settings. Dr. Oster earned her Ph.D. in educational theory and policy from The Pennsylvania State University. Research for her doctoral dissertation investigated sex education policies across the state of Pennsylvania and examined the social, political, and economic factors that influence the design and adoption of these policies.

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APPENDIX J 389 Emily C. Morden, M.S.W., is a research associate with the Board on the Health of Select Populations at the IOM. Prior to working at IOM, she interned in the U.S. Senate, researching issues ranging from international trade relations to veteran health services. Before moving to Washington, DC, Ms. Morden resided in Oregon and worked as a medical social worker for a home hospice program. She has several years of experience working as a residential counselor in both adult and adolescent mental health treatment facilities for the largest community mental health care provider in the state of Oregon. In this role, Ms. Morden gained expertise and clinical skills in supporting clients in their recovery from mental illness. Ms. Morden holds an M.S.W. degree from Portland State University and a bachelor’s degree in sociology from the University of Oregon. Jon Q. Sanders is a veteran program associate with the Board on the Health of Select Populations at the IOM. He received his B.A. in anthropology with a minor in geosciences from Trinity University and recently completed the program management certification at George Mason University. In his 10 years with the National Academies, Mr. Sanders has worked on a variety of projects on topics ranging from childhood obesity to national security. He is coauthor of Sitting Down at the Table: Mediation and Resolution of Water Conflicts (2001). His research interests include public health, emergency management, and environmental decision making. Frederick (Rick) Erdtmann, M.D., M.P.H., is a graduate of Bucknell Uni- versity, where he received a B.S. degree in biology. He earned an M.P.H. from the University of California, Berkeley. He attended Temple Univer- sity School of Medicine in Philadelphia, where he earned his doctorate of medicine. Dr. Erdtmann is board certified in preventive medicine. He spent 30 years as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Army Medical Department with a variety of assignments, including chief of the Preventive Medicine Services at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, Frankfurt Army Medical Center in Germany, and Madigan Army Medical Center. He also served as division surgeon for the Second Infantry Division and as chief of the P ­ reventive Medicine Consultant’s Division in the surgeon general’s office. Dr. Erdtmann served as commander of Evans Army Community Hospital from 1995 to 1997. He was deputy chief of staff for clinical operations within TRICARE Region 1 prior to assuming Hospital Command at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in March 1998. He then was assigned to the Office of the Surgeon General as deputy assistant surgeon general for force development. Following military retirement in 2001, Dr. Erdt- mann joined the IOM. He currently serves as director of the Board on the Health of Select Populations (formerly the Board on Military and Veterans Health).

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