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Appendix D Biographic Sketches of Committee Members, Consultants, and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS James F. Childress, PhD (Chair), is University Professor and John Allen Hollingsworth Professor of Ethics at the University of Virginia, where he directs the Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life. At the University of Virginia, he is also Professor of Religious Studies in the College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Research in Medical Education in the School of Medicine. His research interests include theory and method in biomedical ethics and the role of biomedical ethics in public policy. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and, among other activities, he chairs the Health Sciences Policy Board and previously chaired the IOM Committee on Increasing the Rates of Organ Donation in 2005 2006 and the IOM Planning Committee for Symposium on dual l oyalties in military in 2008. Dr. Childress was the Vice Chair of the N ational Task Force on Organ Transplantation and he also served on the Board of Direc- tors of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), the UNOS Ethics Committee, the Biomedical Ethics Advisory Committee, the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee, and several Data and Safety Monitoring Boards for NIH clinical trials. In 1996, President Clinton appointed him to the Na- tional Bioethics Advisory Commission. Dr. Childress is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as of the Hastings Center, and he has been the Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. P rofessor of Christian Ethics at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown University. He received his BA from Guilford College, his BD from Yale Divinity School, and his MA and PhD from Yale University. 179

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180 FUTURE USES OF THE DOD JPC BIOREPOSITORY Alexander M. Capron, LLB, is University Professor at the University of Southern California, where he holds the Scott H. Bice Chair of Healthcare Law, Policy and Ethics in the Gould School of Law and is a Professor of Law and Medicine in the Keck School of Medicine. He serves as the Co- Director of the Pacific Center for Health Policy and Ethics, a campus-wide interdisciplinary research and education center. His areas of interest in re- search include genetic databanks and biobanks, euthanasia and end-of-life care, conflicts of interest in research and practice, and the work of national ethics commissions. Professor Capron served as the first Director of Ethics, Trade, Human Rights and Health Law at the World Health Organization and was appointed by President Clinton to the National Bioethics Advi- sory Commission. He has served as President of the American Society of Law Medicine and Ethics, as President of the International Association of Bioethics, and as Chair of the Biomedical Ethics Advisory Committee of the U.S. Congress. Professor Capron chaired the Board of Advisors of the American Board of Internal Medicine and served on the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee at the National Institutes of Health and on various panels at the Institute of Medicine. He is a Member of the Institute of Medi- cine and of the American Law Institute, Founding Fellow of the Hastings Center, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Professor Capron received a BA from Swarthmore College and an LLB from Yale University, where he was an officer of the Yale Law Journal. Carolyn C. Compton, MD, PhD, is President and CEO of Critical Path Institute. She was formerly Director of the NCI Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research. In addition to human biospecimen science, her research interests include translational studies in colon cancer, pancreatic cancer, and wound healing. Before working at NCI, Dr. Compton was the Strathcona Professor and Chair of Pathology and the Pathologist-in- Chief of McGill University Health Center. Prior to this, she had been a Professor of Pathology at the Harvard Medical School and the Massachu- setts General Hospital, where she had been the Director of Gastrointestinal Pathology for many years. Currently, she is an adjunct Professor of Pathol- ogy at the Johns Hopkins Medical School. Dr. Compton holds several na- tional and international leadership positions in professional organizations such as the College of American Pathologists, the Cancer and Leukemia Group B, the American Joint Committee on Cancer, and the American Society of Clinical Oncology. She is also a member of the editorial boards of Cancer, Biopreservation and Biobanking, and Clinical Proteomics. She received her BA in Biology at Brin Mawr College, her MD from Harvard Medical School, and PhD in Anatomy from the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. She trained in both Anatomic Pathology and Clinical Pathology at Harvard's Brigham and Women's Hospital.

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APPENDIX D 181 Kelly Edwards, PhD, is Associate Professor in the Department of B ioethics and Humanities at the University of Washington School of Medicine and Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental and Occu pational Health Sciences. She is also a core faculty for the Institute for Public Health Genetics in the School of Public Health. Dr. Edwards' research in- terests include community-based research practices, environmental justice, everyday ethics in research practice, feminist and narrative approaches to bioethics, and integrating ethics into training programs and public policy. She is the Co-Chair of the Biobank Working Group for the Clinical Trans- lational Science Awards Key Function Committee in Ethics, Director of the Community Outreach and Ethics Core for the NIEHS-funded Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, and Core Lead for the E thics of Partnership Core for the NHGRI-funded Center for G enomics and Health- care Equality. Dr. Edwards was the recipient of funding from the Greenwall Foundation Presidential Award for research resulting in the publication "Testing Justice: A Normative Framework for Genetic Research and Prac- tice" and an edited volume from Oxford University Press (2011): Achieving Justice in Genomic Translation. She received an AB in Philosophy from Occidental College, an MA in Medical Ethics, and a PhD in Philosophy of Education from the University of Washington. Bradley A. Malin, PhD, is the Director of the Health Information Privacy Laboratory (HIPLab), an Associate Professor of Biomedical Informatics, and an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Vanderbilt University. His research focuses on the development and evaluation of data privacy technologies, with an emphasis on personal biomedical information. Malin served as the Organizing Chair of the workshop on the HIPAA Privacy Rule's De-Identification Standard for the HHS Office of Civil Rights in 2010 and for the Electronic Health Information & Privacy Conference in 2009. He was also the Scientific Program Chair of the Privacy Aspects of Data Mining Workshop at the IEEE International Conference on Data Mining. He served on the committees of the ACM International Health Informatics Symposium, the ACM/IEEE Model-Based Trustworthy Health Information Systems Workshop (MOTHIS), and the IEEE Conference on Healthcare Informatics, Imaging, and Systems Biology. In 2010, Malin received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on outstanding scien- tists and engineers beginning their independent careers. Malin received his BS in Biological Sciences, his MS in Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining, MPhil in Public Policy and Management, and his PhD in Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University.

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182 FUTURE USES OF THE DOD JPC BIOREPOSITORY Guido Marcucci, MD, is Professor of Medicine, the John B. and Jane T. McCoy Chair in Cancer Research, and the Associate Director of Transla- tional Research at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, where he also works as an attending physician of the Leukemia/Lymphoma and Bone Marrow Transplant Services. He is the Director of the Compre- hensive Cancer Center Leukemia Tissue Bank and the co-director of the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Leukemia Tissue Bank. Prior to his current position, Dr. Marcucci was the Associate Professor of Medicine and Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics and Phar- maceutics, as well as an NIH T32 Fellow of the Division of Hematology- Oncology at the Comprehensive Cancer Center. His research focuses on tissue banking and development and validation of biomarkers for treatment prediction and prognostication in leukemia, including whole-genome gene and microRNA expression and epigenetic profiling. He chairs the CALGB Leukemia Correlative Science Committee and currently oversees the mo- lecular screening for FLT3 mutations that tests the eligibility of North American AML patients for CALGB 10603, a multi-institutional trial in- volving also major European academic institutions. Dr. Marcucci serves as member of the AML working group for the NCI Leukemia Steering Committee, and he is member of the ASCO Scientific Program Committee. He earned his MD degree from the Catholic University of Sacred Heart in Rome, Italy, where he graduated summa cum laude. He completed his internal medicine internship and residency at the State University of New York at Buffalo and a 2-year medical oncology fellowship at the Roswell Park Cancer Institution. Robert L. Reddick, MD, is the Chair and Frank Townsend Professor of Pathology, Past Interim Dean of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sci- ences, and Director of the Histology and Electron Microscopy Labs at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. Prior to his current position, Dr. Reddick was a Professor of Pathology and Chair of the Department of Pathology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Medical School. His current research projects include studies of mouse models of atherosclerosis and studies of the genetic basis of aging. Dr. Reddick is a member of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology and the American Society of Investigative Pathology. He is also a member of the AFIP Scientific Advisory Board and the Texas Society of Pathologists. He served in the United States Army Walter Reed Institute of Dental Research in 19661968. Dr. Reddick received his BA in chem- istry, his MS in experimental pathology, and his MD at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he proceeded to be named the first Kenneth M. Brinkhous, M.D. Distinguished Professor.

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APPENDIX D 183 Frederick J. Schoen, MD, PhD, is Professor of Pathology and Health Sci- ences and Technology at Harvard Medical School and Director of Cardiac Pathology and Executive Vice-Chairman in the Department of Pathology at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH). As Executive Vice-Chair, he has leadership responsibility for the allocation of human tissue-based re- sources for clinical trials and translational research, especially those related to advanced molecular diagnostics. Dr. Schoen is also Co-Director of the BWH Biomedical Research Institute (BRI) Technology in Medicine Initia- tive and BWH liaison to the Center for Integration of Medicine and Inno- vative Technology (CIMIT). He is an active teacher/director of courses in pathology, cardiovascular pathology, and biomaterials, medical devices, and tissue engineering at Harvard and MIT, some of which utilize large collec- tions of archived gross pathology specimens. Dr. Schoen's research focuses on cardiovascular pathology, heart valve substitutes, biomaterials, and tissue engineering. In 2009, Dr. Schoen was appointed by M assachusetts Governor Deval Patrick to serve as a member of the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) Medico-Legal Commission, which oversees Forensic Pathology activities in the Commonwealth. He also serves or has served on many national and international academic and governmental advisory committees, grant review committees and editorial boards, and is consultant and scientific advisor to numerous medical device companies. Dr. Schoen earned his BSE in Materials and Metallurgical Engineering from the University of Michigan, his PhD in Materials Science from Cornell University, and his MD from the University of Miami School of Medicine. Michael L. Shelanski, MD, PhD, is the Delafield Professor and Chairman of the Department of Pathology and Cell Biology at Columbia University and the Director of Pathology Service at New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Center. He is also the Co-Director of the Taub Insti- tute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, the D irector of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, and the Director of the Medical Scientist Training Program at Columbia University. Dr. Shelanski was the Associate Professor of Neuropathology and Assistant Pathologist and Senior Associate at Harvard Medical School in 19741978. His areas of expertise include Cell Biology, Neurobiology of Disease, and Medical Education of physician scientists. His research focuses on the mechanism of memory disruption and synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Shelanski is on the Board of Directors of the Burke Research Institute and the Board of Directors of the N. Bud Grossman Center for Memory Research and Care. He is the President of the External Advisory Board of Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle pinire and was the Associate Editor of the Journal of Neuroscience in 19992004. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Shelanski received his MD and PhD from the University of Chicago.

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184 FUTURE USES OF THE DOD JPC BIOREPOSITORY Robert West, MD, PhD, is Associate Professor of Pathology and Co- Director of the Immunodiagnosis Laboratory at Stanford University Medical Center. He is also a Staff Pathologist for the Palo Alto Veterans Administration. His research focuses on gene expression profiling of soft tissue tumors to examine stromal expression patterns in carcinomas, as well as RNA-seq expression studies of potential therapeutic gene targets in epithelial can- cers and soft tissue tumors. Dr. West is an Editorial Board member of the American Journal of Surgical Pathology. He is a member of United States and Canadian Association of Pathologists and the American Society for Investigative Pathology. In 1993, Dr. West was a recipient of the Research Award from the American Federation for Clinical Research and was hon- ored with the Rosenblatt Award of Pathology at Washington University in 1999. Dr. West received his BS in Biology at Brown University and his MD and PhD in immunology at Washington University. Ignacio I. Wistuba, MD, is the Jay and Lori Eisenberg Professor in the Department of Pathology with a joint appointment in the Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology (THNMO) at The Uni- versity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Wistuba is a surgical and molecular pathologist with a strong record of scientific achievements in the study of lung and gastrointestinal cancers that includes more than 200 peer-reviewed papers and several book chapters. He is the director of the Thoracic Molecular Pathology Laboratory at the MD Anderson Can- cer Center and Director of the THNMO Laboratory Research Program. Dr. Wistuba has established a tissue bank resource of lung cancer specimens with annotated clinical data. He also coordinates the distribution of speci- mens for molecular analysis to several institutional and national research projects including U.S. Department of Defense, NCI-funded studies, United Against Lung Cancer, V Foundation, and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT). Dr. Wistuba's research interests include the elu- cidation of the molecular abnormalities involved in the early pathogenesis of lung cancer, the identification of molecular markers for prognosis, the identification of new molecular targets and the validation of biomarkers for targeted-therapy, and the identification of molecular markers associated to metastasis development. A major aspect of Dr. Wistuba's efforts involves overseeing correlative laboratory biomarker studies for lung cancer preven- tion and therapy trials (MD Anderson BATTLE program) and preclinical studies of animal lung carcinogenesis. Dr. Wistuba earned his MD from the Austral University of Chile and his Pathology degree from the Catholic University of Chile. Susan M. Wolf, JD, is the McKnight Presidential Professor of Law, Medi- cine & Public Policy and the Faegre & Benson Professor of Law at the

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APPENDIX D 185 University of Minnesota, as well as Professor of Medicine. She is also a faculty member at the Center for Bioethics and the founding Chair of the University's Consortium on Law and Values in Health, Environment & the Life Sciences. Much of her research focuses on the return of incidental findings and individual research results to participants, including in large- scale research using biobanks and archives. Ms. Wolf spent several years practicing law at Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison in New York. In 1984, she became a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellow and then Associate for Law at The Hastings Center, a research in- stitute in New York specializing in biomedical ethics. She also taught law and medicine at New York University Law School for 6 years as an Adjunct Associate Professor. Ms. Wolf has been a Fellow in the Program in Ethics and the Professions at Harvard University and is currently a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). She is a member of the Institute of Medicine, past member of the American Society for Bioethics & Humanities (ASBH) Board of Directors and former Chair of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) Section on Law, Medicine and Health Care. Ms. Wolf has served on a variety of governmental and institutional panels, including the American Bar Association (ABA) Coor- dinating Group on Bioethics and the Law, American Society for Reproduc- tive Medicine (ASRM) Ethics Committee, and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Ethics Committee. She is Executive Editor of the Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology. Ms. Wolf received her AB summa cum laude from Princeton University and her JD from Yale Law School, with graduate work at Harvard University. CONSULTANTS Jeffrey T. Mason, PhD, is the Director of the Laboratory of Proteomics and Protein Science at the Washington, DC, Veterans Affairs (VA) Medi- cal C enter. Prior to taking his position at the VA, he was the Chairman of the Department of Biophysics at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP). Dr. Mason received his PhD in Physical Biochemistry from the University of Virginia in 1982 and remained at the university as a Research Assistant Professor in the Biochemistry Department before joining the AFIP in 1986. While at the AFIP, Dr. Mason also served as the Administrative Director of the AFIP Magnetic Resonance Imaging Center and Co-Director of the Brain Injury Research Center, a collaborative program between the AFIP and the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center. Dr. Mason served as the Chairman of the AFIP Research Committee and was a member of the AFIP Institutional Review Board. He was the Department of Defense rep- resentative to the National Advisory General Medical Sciences Council of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and served on the Council's work-

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186 FUTURE USES OF THE DOD JPC BIOREPOSITORY ing group for the evaluation of the Minority Opportunities in Research (MORE) programs and the Council's Scientific Workforce Development Committee. Dr. Mason has served on numerous NIH and VA Study Sections and VA Advisory Panels, and has served on the editorial boards of several scientific journals. In 2001 and 2011, Dr. Mason received the Department of the Army Commander's Award for Civilian Service and in 2010 he was elected as a Fellow of the Washington Academy of Sciences. Pilar Ossorio, JD, PhD, is Associate Professor of Law and Bioethics at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, and Program Faculty in the Graduate Program in Population Health at the UW. Prior to taking her position at UW, she was Director of the Genetics Section at the Institute for Ethics at the American Medical Association, and taught as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Chicago Law School. Dr. Ossorio received her PhD in Microbiology and Immunology in 1990 from Stanford University. She went on to complete a postdoctoral fellowship in cell biology at Yale University School of Medicine. Throughout the early 1990s Dr. Ossorio also worked as a consultant for the federal program on the Ethical, L egal, and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project, and in 1994 she took a full time position with the Department of Energy's ELSI program. In 1993 she served on the Ethics Working Group for President Clinton's Health Care Reform Task Force. Dr. Ossorio received her JD from the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law (Boalt Hall) in 1997. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sci- ence's (AAAS's), a member of the editorial board of the American Journal of Bioethics, chair of an NHGRI advisory group on ethical issues in large scale sequencing, and a member of UW's institutional review board for health sciences research. Dr. Ossorio is a past member of AAAS's Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility, a past member of the National Can- cer Policy Board (Institute of Medicine), and has been a member or chair of several working groups on genetics and ethics. STAFF David A. Butler, PhD, is Scholar and Director of the Medical Follow-Up Agency at the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He received his BS and MS in engineering from the University of Rochester and his PhD in public- policy analysis from Carnegie Mellon University. Before joining the IOM, Dr. Butler served as an analyst for the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment, was Research Associate in the Department of Environmental Health of the Harvard School of Public Health, and performed research at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. He has directed several IOM studies on environmental-health and risk-assessment topics, including ones

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APPENDIX D 187 that produced Damp Indoor Spaces and Health, Clearing the Air: Asthma and Indoor Air Exposures, Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 1998 and Update 2000, and the series Characterizing the Exposure of Veterans to Agent Orange and Other Herbicides Used in Vietnam. Dr. Butler was also a coeditor of Systems Engineering to Improve Traumatic Brain Injury Care in the Military Health System. Lauren N. Savaglio, MS, is Research Associate at the Institute of Medicine. She received her BS in political science and international relations from Arizona State University and her MS in global health from George Mason University (GMU), where her research interests included pesticide use in agriculture and the nutritional status of those infected with HIV/AIDS. She is also an Adjunct Professor in GMU's Department of Global and Com- munity Health and Department of Nutrition, where she teaches public health, nutrition, and environment courses. Before going to the IOM, she practiced as an emergency medical technician at INOVA Fair Oaks Hospital in Virginia, performed HIV/AIDS research for Whitman-Walker Health, and served in the Peace Corps in Togo, West Africa. Rachel S. Briks, BS, is Program Assistant at the Institute of Medicine Board on the Health of Select Populations. She received her BS in commu- nity health from the University of Maryland, College Park, in May 2010. Before joining the IOM, she interned at AED Center on AIDS and Com- munity Health and worked as a clerk for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics through the Student Temporary Employment Program (STEP). Latarsha Carithers, PhD, was a winter 2011 Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the National Academies. She is cur- rent Project Manager with the Office of Biorepository and Biospecimen Research at the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Carithers completed her PhD in pathobiology and molecular medicine at Columbia University in February 2011. Her doctoral work was funded by a National Research Service Award from the NIH and focused on developing mouse models of breast cancer to study the biological function of the protein encoded by the breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1). Prior to graduate school, she received her BS from Spelman College and participated in summer biomedical research programs at Morehouse School of Medicine, Stanford University, and the National Cancer Institute. As a Mirzayan Fellow, Dr. Carithers worked with the Institute of Medicine on the Board on the Health of Select Populations where she gained a broad understanding of how science and policy intersect.

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