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BIOGRAPHIES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Ellen Kullman, cochair, is chair of the board and chief executive officer of E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, where she has market-driven science to drive innovation. She began her career at DuPont in 1988 as a marketing manager and went on to assume positions of increasing responsibility; in 2008 she was tapped to lead the company’s focus on growth in emerging international markets. She is a member of the US-India CEO Forum, the Business Council, the executive committee of SCI-America, the board of directors of United Technologies Corp., and the board of overseers at Tufts University School of Engineering. She is also a member of the board of Change the Equation (CTEq), a national coalition of more than 100 CEOs committed to improving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning for US pre-K–12 students. She holds a BS in mechanical engineering from Tufts University and a master’s in management from Northwestern University.

Charles M. Vest (NAE), cochair, is president of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and president emeritus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He began his career at the University of Michigan, where he taught in the areas of heat transfer, thermo-



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BIOGRAPHIES OF A COMMITTEE MEMBERS Ellen Kullman, cochair, is chair of the board and chief executive officer of E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, where she has ­ hampioned c market-driven science to drive innovation. She began her career at DuPont in 1988 as a marketing manager and went on to assume posi- tions of increasing responsibility; in 2008 she was tapped to lead the company’s focus on growth in emerging international markets. She is a member of the US-India CEO Forum, the Business Council, the executive committee of SCI-America, the board of directors of United Technologies Corp., and the board of overseers at Tufts University School of Engineering. She is also a member of the board of Change the Equation (CTEq), a national coalition of more than 100 CEOs com- mitted to improving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning for US pre-K–12 students. She holds a BS in mechani- cal engineering from Tufts University and a master’s in management from Northwestern University. Charles M. Vest (NAE), cochair, is president of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and president emeritus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He began his career at the University of M ­ ichigan, where he taught in the areas of heat transfer, thermo­ 65

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66 MESSAGING FOR ENGINEERING dynamics, and fluid mechanics and conducted research in heat transfer and engineering applications of laser optics and holography before turning his attention to academic administration. He served as associate dean and then dean of engineering and then provost and vice president for academic affairs. In 1990 he became president of MIT and served in that position until December 2004. As president of MIT, he was active in science, technology, and innovation policy; building partnerships among academia, government, and industry; and championing the importance of open, global scientific communi- cation, travel, and sharing of intellectual resources. During his tenure, MIT launched its OpenCourseWare (OCW) initiative; cofounded the Alliance for Global Sustainability; enhanced the racial, gender, and cultural diversity of its students and faculty; established major new institutes in neuroscience and genomic medicine; and redeveloped much of its campus. Vest has served on various federal committees and commissions, including the President’s Committee of Advisors on Sci- ence and Technology (PCAST) during the Clinton and Bush admin- istrations, the Secretary of Education’s Commission on the Future of Higher Education, and the Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on Transformational Diplomacy. He earned a BS in mechanical engineer- ing from West Virginia University in 1963 and MSE and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1964 and 1967, respectively.  G. Wayne Clough (NAE) is secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, leading the world’s largest museum and research complex with 19 museums, 9 research centers, the National Zoo, and research activities in more than 90 countries. Before his appointment to the Smithsonian, he was president of the Georgia Institute of Technology for 14 years. Clough has been a professor at Duke University, Stanford University, and Virginia Tech. He also served as head of the Department of Civil Engineering and dean of the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech and as provost at the University of Washington. He has received nine national awards from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), including the 2004 OPAL lifetime award for contributions to educa- tion, and has twice been awarded civil engineering’s oldest recogni-

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Appendix A 67 tion, the ­ orman Medal, in 1982 and in 1996. He received the George N ­Westinghouse Award from the American Society for Engineering Edu- cation in 1986 for outstanding teaching and research and the National Engineering Award from the American Association of Engineering Societies in 2002, and in 2008 he was recognized with the NAE Bueche Award for his efforts in public policy. He is a member of the National Science Board and served on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (2001–2008). He was cochair of the 2004 National Innovation Initiative, university vice chair of the US Council on Competitiveness, and chair of the NAE’s Engineer of 2020 project. Clough’s interests include science, technology, and higher-education policy, sustainability, international programs, museums, and history. He has published more than 130 papers and reports and six book chap- ters and has cowritten numerous committee reports. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in civil engineering from Georgia Tech in 1964 and 1965 and a doctorate in 1969 in civil engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Leslie Collins is executive director of the National Engineers Week Foundation, where she is responsible for development and steward- ship of more than 150 corporate, government, engineering society, education, and diversity partners representing more than 1.5 million engineers and engineering students. She initiated the DiscoverE K–12 volunteer program for Engineers Week 1990; National Engineers Week Future City Competition in 1993; Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day in 2001; Global Marathon For, By and About Women in Engineering in 2005; and the foundation’s Diversity Council in 2008. She began her career in public relations at the American Gas Association and went on to become public relations director for the National Society of Pro- fessional Engineers (NSPE). She is a graduate of Boston College and attended graduate school at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland. Don P. Giddens (NAE) is dean emeritus of the College of Engineer- ing at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he is a professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University. He is also Georgia Research

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68 MESSAGING FOR ENGINEERING Alliance Eminent Scholar Emeritus and president of the Parabola Group, LLC, in Atlanta. He joined the Georgia Tech faculty in 1968, after 2 years in the aerospace industry. In 1992 he left his position as chair of Aerospace Engineering to serve as dean of the Whiting School of Engineering and professor of mechanical engineering at the Johns Hopkins University until 1997, when he rejoined Georgia Tech to establish the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering. He is past president and fellow of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and a fellow of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES), American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), ASME, and American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He chaired the NAE com- mittee that authored the report Changing the Conversation: Messages for Improving Public Understanding of Engineering. Giddens has served in a variety of professional activities involving engineering education and biomedical research and remains active and consults on various issues associated with engineering education, diversity in engineering, and biomedical engineering research. He received all his degrees (BAE 1963, MSAE 1965, and PhD 1966) from Georgia Tech. Robert Hoffman is president and chief creative officer of Hoffman and Partners, an advertising and marketing firm based in Boston, Massa- chusetts. His work combines business discipline with creative problem solving. After several years of domestic and international ­ arketing m efforts in the music industry, he teamed with business associate Dan Gearon to found Gearon Hoffman in 1982. The firm achieved national visibility for successful branding efforts on behalf of Rockport footwear, the New York Daily News, Prudential Retirement Services, M ­ assachusetts General Hospital, Grolsch beer, and Boston’s Museum of Science. Gearon Hoffman has also assisted a number of academic institutions, including Worcester Polytechnic Institute and Simmons College. A student of human behavior, Hoffman is sensitive to what drives consumers to act; as a writer, strategist, and creative director, he explores the emotional links that connect consumers with brands. He has a BA in English from Antioch College and pursued graduate studies in communication at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Appendix A 69 Ray O. Johnson, a global executive focused on business, innovation, and diversity, is senior vice president and chief technology officer of the Lockheed Martin Corporation, where he provides leadership in the strategic areas of technology, engineering, production operations, and program management. He also leads the corporation’s Advanced Technology Laboratory and the Center for Innovation, a world-class laboratory for collaborative experimentation and analysis that involves customers and industry partners. He has experience in strategic plan- ning, program development, program management, and venture capital funding. He is a member of the governing board of the Indo-US Science and Technology Forum and a sponsor of the DST–Lockheed Martin India Innovation Growth Program. He is also a member of the board of visitors for the A. James Clark School of Engineering and the School of Computing, Mathematics, and Natural Sciences at the University of Maryland, the Dean’s Advisory Council for the College of Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, and the board of affiliates of the Rice University Professional Science Master’s Program. Johnson also chairs the USA Science and Engineering Festival’s Advisory Board and the US Council on Competitiveness Technology Leadership and Strategy Initiative. He holds a BS in electrical engineering from Okla- homa State University and an MS and PhD in electrical engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology. Virginia (Gini) Kramer is executive creative director at the advertising and public relations firm Keiler & Company, where she oversees print and broadcast advertising, collateral, direct mail, and interactive proj- ects. She is an award-winning copywriter who has broad experience working with clients in a variety of industries: financial services, bank- ing, insurance, health care, aerospace, high technology, medical devices, pharmaceuticals, manufacturing, publishing, and the performing arts. She participated in the NAE’s 2005 preliminary focus group on public understanding of engineering messaging and served on the committee that wrote Changing the Conversation: Messages for Improving Public Understanding of Engineering. She graduated (magna cum laude) from the University of Hartford.

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70 MESSAGING FOR ENGINEERING Irving Pressley McPhail is president and chief executive officer of the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME). He joined NACME in 2007 as executive vice president and chief operating officer (COO), after having served 15 years as a college president or c ­ hancellor at the Community College of Baltimore County, St. Louis Community College at Florissant Valley, and LeMoyne-Owen College. He was also COO of the Baltimore City Public Schools. Under his leadership, the Community College of Baltimore County was named one of 12 ­Vanguard Learning Colleges in the United States and Canada in 2000 by the League for Innovation in the Community College, and in 2003 was awarded the PBS O’Banion Prize for Leading the Way to Change in Teaching and Learning. Working at the nexus of practice, policy, and research in literacy education, postsecondary student suc- cess, community college leadership, and STEM education, McPhail is the coeditor of Teaching African American Learners to Read: Perspectives and Practices (2005) and the author of more than 50 journal articles, chapters, monographs, and technical reports. He serves on the board of directors of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers Education Foundation and is a charter member of the E-Week [Engineers Week] Diversity Council. He also served as a strategy coach in the Achieving the Dream national initiative at Prairie View A&M University in Texas. He earned a bachelor’s degree in development sociology at Cornell University and a master’s in reading at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and was awarded an honorary doctor of engineering degree by the Polytechnic Institute of New York University. E. James (Jim) Prendergast is executive director and COO of IEEE, leading a staff of approximately 1,100 employees in US and over- seas locations. He was previously corporate vice president and chief technology officer for DuPont Electronic and Communication Tech- nologies, where he accelerated growth in the electronics and commu- nications high-tech markets, and before that he was vice president and director of Motorola’s Physical Sciences Research Laboratories, where he directed long-range research in future integrated systems, energy, lab-on-a-chip, and speculative “reach-out” initiatives. He received a PhD in electrical engineering from Cambridge University.

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Appendix A 71 Betty Shanahan is executive director and CEO for the Society of Women Engineers (SWE), a 24,000-member organization that estab- lishes engineering as a highly desirable career aspiration for women. She is also a champion of diversity in engineering and the engineering profession overall. Before joining SWE in 2002, she spent 24 years in development, engineering management, and marketing for the elec- tronics and software industries. She has been responsible for products and technologies in document viewing and conversion, parallel pro- cessing, signal processing, and computer-aided software engineering. Most recently she was vice president of product management and marketing for the Software Components Division of Stellent, Inc. She is president of the Council of Engineering and Scientific Society Execu- tives and in 2012 was named one of STEMConnector’s “100 Women Leaders in STEM.” She is also a certified association executive and a member of the IEEE, ASCE, and ASME. She earned a BS in electrical engineering from Michigan State University, a master’s in software engineering from the Wang Institute of Graduate Studies, and an MBA in strategic management from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

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