Improving the Processes for Recruitment and Retention

The committee’s principal recommendation for improving recruitment and retention is that the department as a whole should prioritize the issues and demonstrate a sustained, serious focus through well-advertised and aggressive actions.

The recruiting process should be made more personal for the potential employee. He or she should have information about the assignment and the supervisory structure of the position. Someone should be assigned to shepherd the paperwork associated with the hiring process. The potential employee should receive status reports on the progress of the process.

For a high-priority set of positions and potential employees, such as cybersecurity professionals, DOD should continue to exercise the authority to temporarily employ an individual while waiting for the clearance process. This action would require the development of useful activities for this period. In addition, expanding DOD’s internship program, sponsoring summer-hire programs, and identifying talent early could allow the clearance process to begin while high-potential individuals are still completing their degrees. In either case, the department should also take aggressive action to shorten the period required for completing a clearance.

DOD should continue as well as expand broadly available scholarship programs (such as SMART) that are aimed at improving the quality of its current and potential employees and are tied to a commitment to service. We believe this action would be valued by the employee and would demonstrate the priority DOD places on the employee.

REFERENCES

Anders, G. 2008. Predictions of the past. Wall Street Journal, January 28.

Brannen, K., and Z. Fryer-Biggs. 2012. U.S. short on offensive cyber experts. Defense News, July 2.

Center for Strategic and International Studies. 2010. A Human Capital Crisis in Cybersecurity. Washington, D.C.: Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Congressional Budget Office. 2012. Comparing the Compensation of Federal and Private-Sector Employees. Washington, D.C.: Congress of the United States.

Epstein, G.L. 2011. The National Security Imperative for Global S&T Engagement. Presentation to the Committee on STEM Workforce Needs of the U.S. DOD and the U.S. Defense Industrial Base, Washington, D.C., September 19.

National Research Council. 2009. Beyond “Fortress America”: National Security Controls on Science and Technology in a Globalized World. Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. 2012. Report of a Workshop on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

Workforce Needs for the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Defense Industrial Base. Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press.

Swallow, E. 2011. Northrop Grumman Corporation. Presentation to the Workshop on STEM Workforce Needs for the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Defense Industrial Base, Rosslyn, Va., August 1.

Vest, C.M. 2011. STEM Workforce Needs for U.S. DOD and Defense Industry Base. Presentation to the Workshop on STEM Workforce Needs for the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Defense Industrial Base, Rosslyn, Va., August 1.



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