The balance of this report is organized as follows: Chapter 2 discusses rapidly evolving areas of science and engineering having potential for significant impact on DOD planning and operations. Chapter 3 elucidates trends in the overall STEM labor force and discusses most likely future scenarios for DOD. Chapter 4 discusses the limitations faced by DOD and the industrial base in meeting its STEM workforce needs. Chapter 5 discusses the educational institutions that feed and maintain DOD’s STEM workforce and some impediments DOD faces within this enterprise. Lastly, Chapter 6 offers a perspective on ensuring an adequate workforce capability in an uncertain future.

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